BUENAS PRÁCTICAS
EN EL DISEÑO DE CURSOS
CON MOODLE
Michelle Moore
Chief Evangelist
Traducción de Laia J. Canet
DISCLAIMER
 Las buenas prácticas están en constante evolución.
 Es importante conocer y tener en consideración a
tu audi...
NO USES más de 3 estilos de fuente por página.
MANTÉN la coherencia.
Captura de pantalla de http://coolcourses.moodle.org/course/view.php?id=43
USA los nombres de sección y las etiquetas.
NO uses la página del curso para el contenido.
USA la página de inicio del curso como
plataforma de lanzamiento.
¡Cuidado con recargar demasiado!
NO tengas miedo del espacio en blanco.
USA imágenes para mejorar tu curso.
NO fuerces al usuario a usar constantemente las
barras de desplazamiento.
NO utilices nombres de actividad demasiado
largos.
USA nombres de actividad cortos y agradables.
SIMPLIFICA la entrega.
NO hagas todo el trabajo tú sólo.
Captura de pantalla de http://coolcourses.moodle.org/course/view.php?id=4
PERMITE que tus alumnos participen y
colaboren.
¡NO te olvides de los registros!
Permite que los alumnos vean sus registros.
Course settings > Show activity reports > Yes
Utiliza las actividades completadas.
No te excedas con las actividades condicionales.
NO temas utilizar distintos recursos y actividades
Trabaja con otr@s.
¡GRACIAS!
 Michelle Moore
 Remote-Learner: http://remote-learner.net
 Email: michelle@remote-learner.net
 Twitter: @mi...
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Michelle Moore - Buenas prácticas en el diseño de cursos con Moodle

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Transparencias de la sesión realizada en la MoodleMoot Madrir 2012 por Michelle Moore sobre Buenas Prácticas en el diseño de cursos con Moodle. Presentación traducida por L.J. Canet

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  • Do maintain consistency.Consistency of font styles, content delivery, and layout.
  • Think about the overall organization of your course and use topic summaries, or titles, and labels to convey that structure to your students. If you're an elementary teacher with just a few resources, your topics might be Reading, Math, Science, and Social Studies. If you're a middle school math teacher, your topics might be labeled by week whereas a high school history teacher might organize by unit or time period.Labels within each unit help you and your students find information or activities more easily--acting as signposts or guides on the page. Labels can be used within a topic to separate sections or a unit or types of activities. In an elementary course, labels might identify the days of the week
  • Don’t use course front page to deliver your content.
  • Do use course page to launch content.
  • Don’t be afraid of white space.
  • DO get to know Creative Commons—just because you can download it from the web, doesn’t make it okay.
  • Watch those activity names.
  • Keep names short and sweet
  • Chunk your contentBe aware of navigation—how many clicks to get to something? Watch your students navigate your course.
  • Let students do the work.*Soapbox*When I develop courses, my driving thought is how I can get students to do the work. I’m probably of least value to my learners if all I am is a content delivery mechanism—information is out there and, no matter how good you are, your way is not going to work for every student. I think of my role as a filter, guide, mentor, motivator—I filter the information they find, provide feedback and support on the work they do, and encouragement and motivation as needed.It’s taken awhile for me to shift my thinking, but now, when people tell me about activities or ideas, my mind automatically goes to this space—I can hardly help it.The last thing I’ll say here is that Moodle’s ability to support this kind of instruction with its granular capabilities and permissions is really what sets it apart from other learning management systems.
  • Build the framework and let the students build the content. Students can contribute to glossaries, forums, wikis, workshops, and even build lessons and quizzes with a couple of settings changes.If you have ideas for how you'd like to use Moodle but aren't sure how to do it or don't have time, recruit a couple of students or the class as a whole to figure it out and build it for you. In my own courses, I try to post a weekly announcement with a recap of the previous week, a preview of the week to come and recognition of a student or group of students for exceptional work in the previous week. This sort of task could pretty easily be turned over to students on a rotating basis. You could also have students add entries to the course calendar; with everything from the daily assignments to student birthdays and the lunch menu, the calendar could become your student's go-to place.If you're not quite sure about having students build activities for your own class, consider teaming up with another teacher. I used to have middle school students build spelling tests for students in younger grades. Or, for primary grade classrooms, older students could create read-aloud stories either from pictures and audio created by the younger students or from text and audio available on sites like Project Gutenberg. These types of activities provide valuable resources for younger students and the older students tend to take pride in the fact that they've created something so useful for others.DO think transparentDO think authenticMoodle Tool guide can be really helpful
  • Logs tell all! With the logs, you'll know if the student logged in. You'll know if the parents used the links you suggested.
  • In your course settings, set Activity logs to Yes to allow students to see their own course logs.
  • Mix it up.
  • Mention conferences here too as a great way to collaborate. (It’s now really about who has the best network, not who has the best content.)Consider ways to leverage your efforts. It's silly for every high school biology teacher to spend time creating the same quiz about cell reproduction. Create shared categories for quiz questions that all science teachers can pull from--you don't have to love them all to reap some benefits. The more questions you have access to, the more practice questions you can provide for your students and the more chances you have to randomize your questions and reduce cheating.If you'd like to go a step further, think about having a common course shell for all teachers in your building or across the district teaching the same grade level or same subject. For example, create a course for the three first-grade teachers in your building and work together to build activities and content there. Then, each teacher can pull the activities they like into their own course for their students and tailor it as they wish.Another plug for Creative Commons--search for courses others have created and share your own--MOOCH.
  • Michelle Moore - Buenas prácticas en el diseño de cursos con Moodle

    1. 1. BUENAS PRÁCTICAS EN EL DISEÑO DE CURSOS CON MOODLE Michelle Moore Chief Evangelist Traducción de Laia J. Canet
    2. 2. DISCLAIMER  Las buenas prácticas están en constante evolución.  Es importante conocer y tener en consideración a tu audiencia.  Haz lo que puedas.
    3. 3. NO USES más de 3 estilos de fuente por página.
    4. 4. MANTÉN la coherencia. Captura de pantalla de http://coolcourses.moodle.org/course/view.php?id=43
    5. 5. USA los nombres de sección y las etiquetas.
    6. 6. NO uses la página del curso para el contenido.
    7. 7. USA la página de inicio del curso como plataforma de lanzamiento.
    8. 8. ¡Cuidado con recargar demasiado!
    9. 9. NO tengas miedo del espacio en blanco.
    10. 10. USA imágenes para mejorar tu curso.
    11. 11. NO fuerces al usuario a usar constantemente las barras de desplazamiento.
    12. 12. NO utilices nombres de actividad demasiado largos.
    13. 13. USA nombres de actividad cortos y agradables.
    14. 14. SIMPLIFICA la entrega.
    15. 15. NO hagas todo el trabajo tú sólo. Captura de pantalla de http://coolcourses.moodle.org/course/view.php?id=4
    16. 16. PERMITE que tus alumnos participen y colaboren.
    17. 17. ¡NO te olvides de los registros!
    18. 18. Permite que los alumnos vean sus registros. Course settings > Show activity reports > Yes
    19. 19. Utiliza las actividades completadas.
    20. 20. No te excedas con las actividades condicionales.
    21. 21. NO temas utilizar distintos recursos y actividades
    22. 22. Trabaja con otr@s.
    23. 23. ¡GRACIAS!  Michelle Moore  Remote-Learner: http://remote-learner.net  Email: michelle@remote-learner.net  Twitter: @michelledmoore  Presentations: http://slideshare.net/michelledmoore  Laia J. Canet  CV&A Consulting: http://www.cvaconsulting.com  Email: lcanet@cvaconsulting.com  Twitter: @laiajoana  Presentations: http://slideshare.net/laiajoana

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