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MOI Abhishek Parmar.pptx

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MOI Abhishek Parmar.pptx

  1. 1. Presented by: Abhishek Parmar M20201512
  2. 2.  Industry 4.0 refers to the fourth industrial revolution, although it is concerned with areas that are not usually classified as industry applications in their own right, such as smart cities.  The first industrial revolution came with the advent of mechanization, steam power and water power.  This was followed by the second industrial revolution, which revolved around mass production and assembly lines using electricity.  The third industrial revolution came with electronics, I.T. systems and automation, which led to the fourth industrial revolution that is associated with cyber physical systems.
  3. 3. Industry 4.0 Technologies 01 The internet of things (IoT) 03 Cyber-physical systems (CPS) 05 Smart factories 07 Cognitive computing 04 Smart manufacture 06 Cloud computing 08 Artificial intelligence 02 The industrial internet of things (IIoT)
  4. 4. What is Virtual Reality (VR)? The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both ‘virtual’ and ‘reality’. The definition of ‘virtual’ is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term ‘virtual reality’ basically means ‘near-reality’. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation. In technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions. V I R T U A L R E A L I T Y
  5. 5. Why have virtual reality? This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well. Architecture Sport Medicine Arts Entertainment VR
  6. 6. Features of virtual reality systems  There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.  Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the person’s head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.  A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses – in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the person’s actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.  The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience. VR
  7. 7. AUGMENTED REALITY (AR) Augmented reality is a highly visual, interactive method of presenting relevant digital information in the context of the physical environment— connecting employees and improving business outcomes. Industrial augmented reality offers a better way to create and deliver easily consumable work instructions by overlaying digital content onto real- world work environments..
  8. 8. AR addresses workforce challenges through easy capture and documentation of expert best practices and presentation of digital content in real-world context. AR provides new approaches to key business challenges Industrial organizations in a variety of verticals around the world are already realizing the value of successfully implementing enterprise AR. Enterprise AR delivers ROI in real-world applications From smartphones and tablets to RealWear and HoloLens 2 headsets, AR instructions can easily be published and viewed on a wide range of devices across the enterprise AR applications are delivered on mainstream devices Use cases of AR in Industry Better information delivery, faster knowledge transfer, modernized training methods, immediate access to remote expertise, and enhanced customer experiences. Augmented reality is reshaping how frontline employees acquire knowledge and digitally interact with their physical surroundings—resulting in faster execution, less manual processes, and better decision making.
  9. 9. Mixed Reality (MR) Mixed reality (MR) is a user environment in which physical reality and digital content are combined in a way that enables interaction with and among real-world and virtual objects. Unlike virtual reality (VR) which immerses the end user in a completely digital environment, or augmented reality (AR) which layers digital content on top of a physical environment, mixed reality blends digital and real world settings. Mixed reality is sometimes considered a type of augmented reality (AR), but its capacity for interactivity between real-world and digital elements places it further along the virtuality continuum, which has physical reality at one extreme and immersive virtual reality at the other. Mixed reality is sometimes also referred to as hybrid reality or extended reality (XR). A headset form factor follows the user's gaze and maps the user's physical surroundings and software then uses deep learning algorithms to align digital content with specific areas of the map. MR programming allows digital objects to interact with physical objects and people to interact with digital objects as if they are physical. The result is that an ordinary desktop can turn into an interactive computer touch screen or an MR-generated film character can sit on the homeowner's couch.
  10. 10. Use cases for Mixed Reality Design Designers can use MR to interact with new products before they are built. B2B communication International corporations can use MR to provide simulated face-to- face meetings with geographically dispersed product teams. Healthcare Surgeons can use MR to practice inserting an extremely small medical implant into a specific patient’s body. Supply chain management a supply chain manager can view a pallet through his smartphone's camera or smart glasses Construction supervisors can use MR to cue workers about what work needs to be completed. Manufacturing Inspectors can use MR headsets during plant tours and view real- time data for specific mechanical components.
  11. 11. Thank You

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