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Strategies to Deal with Collaborative Healthcare Communication

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Strategies to Deal with Collaborative Healthcare Communication

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https://www.connectedhealthpulse.com/frs/21894009/streamlining-patient-care--the-integration-of-collaborative-healthcare-software/email

Due to the impact of COVID-19, integrating telehealth software into practices and organizations has become the new normal. In turn, this has increased the effectiveness of collaborative healthcare by strengthening communication amongst healthcare workers and helping combat the woes of burnout. Communication between patients and healthcare providers has also improved, allowing patients to reach their providers easily and decreasing turnaround time.

But what happens when the doctor’s pager is constantly going off, the phones are constantly ringing, and the emails won’t stop? While collaborative healthcare has significantly improved patient care, we also see the negative effects it has on healthcare staff driven by message and alert fatigue.

After this webinar, you will walk away with insight on the following:

The discussion surrounding collaborative healthcare communication
• Better stakeholder engagement to deal with message and alert fatigue
• How to optimize unified communication and collaboration tools
• The importance of setting work-life balance expectations when implementing software

https://www.connectedhealthpulse.com/frs/21894009/streamlining-patient-care--the-integration-of-collaborative-healthcare-software/email

Due to the impact of COVID-19, integrating telehealth software into practices and organizations has become the new normal. In turn, this has increased the effectiveness of collaborative healthcare by strengthening communication amongst healthcare workers and helping combat the woes of burnout. Communication between patients and healthcare providers has also improved, allowing patients to reach their providers easily and decreasing turnaround time.

But what happens when the doctor’s pager is constantly going off, the phones are constantly ringing, and the emails won’t stop? While collaborative healthcare has significantly improved patient care, we also see the negative effects it has on healthcare staff driven by message and alert fatigue.

After this webinar, you will walk away with insight on the following:

The discussion surrounding collaborative healthcare communication
• Better stakeholder engagement to deal with message and alert fatigue
• How to optimize unified communication and collaboration tools
• The importance of setting work-life balance expectations when implementing software

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Strategies to Deal with Collaborative Healthcare Communication

  1. 1. Agenda: 1. Background and Problem Statement 2. Current State 3. Future State 4. Recommended Strategies –Non Direct Care 5. Direct Care 6. Q&A 7. Wrap up
  2. 2. September, 2013 Journal of Patient Safety, John T. James, Ph.D. IOM figure was probably underestimated: 210,000 – 440,000 deaths due to preventable medical errors May, 2016 BMJ, (Markary & Daniel) Third-leading cause of death in America, behind heart disease and cancer ….14 Years Later
  3. 3. 2016…. • The Joint Commission’s sentinel event database includes reports of inadequate hand-off communication causing adverse events, including wrong-site surgery, delay in treatment, falls, and medication errors. A study released in 2016 estimated that communication failures in U.S. hospitals and medical practices were responsible at least in part for 30 percent of all malpractice claims, resulting in 1,744 deaths and $1.7 billion in malpractice costs over five years.
  4. 4. Effective Communication • Complete: relevant information; avoid unnecessary detail • Clear: standard terminology; minimize use of acronyms • Brief: be concise • Timely: avoid delays; verify, validate, and acknowledge
  5. 5. Types of Unified Team Communication Direct care Non Direct care Both
  6. 6. What does this look like? Non Direct care Who?
  7. 7. Handoff is… • The transfer of information during transitions in care across the continuum • Includes an opportunity to ask questions, clarify, and confirm
  8. 8. Strategies: • Minimize interruptions, Right person, timing, context, actionable • Match channel to the urgency • Target recipients to minimize noise and burnout • Readback and clarification • Psychological safety-Power Distance Hierarchy • WWW • Beware of HIPAA • Use standard technology enabled tools and format- SBAR, Callout, Handoff, I PASS THE BATON etc
  9. 9. TeamSTEPPS Concepts Concept Definition Call-Out To Request or Provide Information Cross-Check Parroting Requests for Confirmation of Understanding Check-Back Closing the loop of communication. SBAR Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation Brief Short planning session prior to start Huddle Team regroup to reestablish awareness and planning Hand-Off Transfer of information during transitions CUS I’m Concerned, I’m Uncomfortable, This is a Safety Issue Two-Challenge It is your responsibility to assertively voice a concern at least two times to ensure it had been heard.
  10. 10. Review of SKILLS 100-Level Skills 200-Level Skills 300-Level Skills Request Call-Out Cross-Check Check-Back SBAR Brief Huddle Debrief Handoff Cross-Monitoring STEP Task Assistance Shared Mental Model CUS Two-Challenge Rule DESC I’M SAFE
  11. 11. SBAR • A communication technique that provides a standardized framework to communicate about a patient’s condition. (Can also be referred to as ISBAR, where I stands for introductions)
  12. 12. SBAR Example • Intro: Hi, Dr. Wilson, this is Ann. I’m calling about Baby Girl Disher. • Situation: She’s having a lot of ABD events that are now requiring stimulation. • Background: She is 29 weeks corrected and was the baby that you evaluated earlier for increased apnea and bradycardia events. • Assessment: She is still on room air but her color doesn’t look right. I think she is getting sicker. Assessment is that she may be getting sicker. • Recommendation: I recommend we do an evaluation, maybe some labs.
  13. 13. “I PASS THE BATON” Introduction: Introduce yourself and your role/job (include patient) Patient: Identifiers, age, sex, location Assessment: Present chief complaint, vital signs, symptoms, and diagnosis Situation: Current status/circumstances, including code status, level of uncertainty, recent changes, and response to treatment Safety: Critical lab values/reports, socioeconomic factors, allergies, and alerts (falls, isolation, etc.) THE Background: Comorbidities, previous episodes, current medications, and family history Actions: What actions were taken or are required? Provide brief rationale Timing: Level of urgency and explicit timing and prioritization of actions Ownership: Who is responsible (nurse/doctor/team)? Include patient/family responsibilities Next: What will happen next? Anticipated changes? What is the plan? Are there contingency plans?
  14. 14. Other Examples of Handoff Tools • ANTICipate • Administrative Data; New clinical information; Tasks to be performed; Illness severity; Contingency plans for changes • I PASS • Illness severity; Patient Summary; Action list for the new team; Situation awareness and contingency plans; Synthesis and “read back” of the information • SHARQ • Situation; History; Assessment; Recommendations/Result; Questions
  15. 15. 24 Tools & Strategies Summary TOOLS and STRATEGIES Communication • SBAR • Call-Out • Check-Back • Handoff Leading Teams • Brief • Huddle • Debrief Situation Monitoring • STEP • I’M SAFE Mutual Support • Task Assistance • Feedback • Assertive Statement • Two-Challenge Rule • CUS • DESC Script OUTCOMES ◼ Shared Mental Model ◼ Adaptability ◼ Team Orientation ◼ Mutual Trust ◼ Team Performance ◼ Patient Safety!! BARRIERS • Inconsistency in Team Membership • Lack of Time • Lack of Information Sharing • Hierarchy • Defensiveness • Conventional Thinking • Complacency • Varying Communication Styles • Conflict • Lack of Coordination and Followup With Coworkers • Distractions • Fatigue • Workload • Misinterpretation of Cues • Lack of Role Clarity
  16. 16. 8 TIPS from Joint Commission
  17. 17. 8 TIPS from Joint Commission
  18. 18. 8 TIPS from Joint Commission
  19. 19. 8 TIPS from Joint Commission
  20. 20. Q&A

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