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The Simpsons, Design, and Data Use

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Slides from an interactive workshop focused on exposing M&E practitioners to design thinking approaches to understand the needs and experiences of data users at MERL Tech 2017

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The Simpsons, Design, and Data Use

  1. 1. The Simpsons, Design, and Data UseAmanda Makulec | Excella Consulting Barb Knittel | John Snow Inc. MERLTech 2017 Featuring work funded by
  2. 2. D E S IGN THINKING
  3. 3. How can we put ourselves as designers into the data user’s shoes?
  4. 4. What are our data user’s wants, needs, and interests?
  5. 5. What are our data user’s challenges and pain points?
  6. 6. EMPATHY
  7. 7. STORIES
  8. 8. CHAR ACTERS
  9. 9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1a7tiA1Qzo
  10. 10. OUR DE S IGN JOURNEY
  11. 11. Design framework adapted from Stanford d. School From “Applying User-centered Design to Data Use Challenges:What we Learned” https://www.measureevaluation.org/resources/publications/tr-17-161
  12. 12. 18
  13. 13. 20
  14. 14. Personas help us move beyond job titles stakeholder groups organization names and focus on the human side of your audience.
  15. 15. Each persona represents a significant portion of people in the real world and enables the designer to focus on a manageable and memorable cast of characters, instead of focusing on thousands of individuals.” “A persona is depicted as a specific person but is not a real individual; rather, it is synthesized from observations of many people. From: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/08 /a-closer-look-at-personas-part-1/
  16. 16. 23
  17. 17. • LOVE data • Hard workers and proactive in work • Frustrated by environments that accept lower performers • Desire for perfection can push them to work long hours and burn out Go Getters
  18. 18. • Full of energy • Seek attention constantly • Require very hands-on supervision • Can be creative problem solvers, but requires focused workplan to stay on task Hyperactives
  19. 19. • Always “busy” but do not produce quality outputs • Always miss deadlines and targets • Flourish in an environment with no consequences • Full of excuses and avoid responsibilities Lazy Dodgers
  20. 20. design sprint
  21. 21. PE RS ONAS <CHARACTERS>
  22. 22. Identify your stakeholder group(s).
  23. 23. District Health Executive Team for example
  24. 24. Capture data on your stakeholder group.
  25. 25. Analytical ability Job function Education Programmatic knowledge Access to tools Motivations to use data Pain points Interests Where they access information Champion or opposition
  26. 26. Talking directly to members of your audience gives you the greatest insight into their wants, needs, and pain points.
  27. 27. If you’ve worked with this stakeholder group before, you can also brainstorm based on experience.
  28. 28. Identify 2-3 different “personas” within each stakeholder group.
  29. 29. District Health Executive Team The Technocrat The Politician segmented to
  30. 30. Name your personas & give them stories.
  31. 31. District Health Executive Team Rachel The Technocrat Pascal The Politician segmented to
  32. 32. Credit toThinkPlace Foundation, from the Innovations for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Initiative’s Care Community Hub
  33. 33. Identify common characteristics and differences
  34. 34. Wants stories Wants numbers Motivated by passion Motivated by money Act based on feelings Act based on data Resilient problem solver Frustrated bureaucrat Champion for your issue Oppose your issue
  35. 35. Wants stories Wants numbers Motivated by passion Motivated by money Act based on feelings Act based on data Resilient problem solver Frustrated bureaucrat Champion for your issue Oppose your issue Rachel the Technocrat Pascal the Politician
  36. 36. YOUR TURN: PERSONAS
  37. 37. Design framework adapted from Stanford d. School From “Applying User-centered Design to Data Use Challenges:What we Learned” https://www.measureevaluation.org/resources/publications/tr-17-161
  38. 38. DEFINE
  39. 39. JOURNE Y MAPS <STORIES>
  40. 40. Creating a journey map is an excellent way to systematically think about the steps or milestones of a process, and can be used in developing empathy and in communicating about your work.1 You can use the steps on the journey map to identify pain points for your data user that can be transformed into opportunities for you in sharing your data. 1 Definition from https://dschool-old.stanford.edu/groups/k12/wiki/d8073/Journey_Map.html
  41. 41. Pick a persona.
  42. 42. Map out the various (ideal) steps that person takes in making a decision.
  43. 43. Pascal The Politician Community scorecard data is collected in Pascal’s district Pascal takes action with the district supply chain team to identify root causes of the issue Analysis shows 4 clinics in Pascal’s district have stockouts of condoms Pascal is unaware of the stockouts NGO meets with Pascal in his office to share the data Pascal shares the issue with the District Health Executive Team The DHE checks the logistics information system and sees the stockouts were not reported
  44. 44. I am aware… I think about my options… I decide… I seek… I receive… I share… Use a set of prompts if you’re having trouble mapping out steps
  45. 45. Identify the pain points along that journey.
  46. 46. Pascal The Politician Community scorecard data is collected in Pascal’s district Pascal takes action with the district supply chain team to identify root causes of the issue Analysis shows 4 clinics in Pascal’s district have stockouts of condoms Pascal is unaware of the stockouts NGO meets with Pascal in his office to share the data Pascal shares the issue with the District Health Executive Team The DHE checks the logistics information system and sees the stockouts were not reported Pascal has limited time and needs something short he can easily share with other DHE members The DHE may see no stockouts in their system and doubt the accuracy of the community data
  47. 47. Identify how you could address each pain point.
  48. 48. Pascal The Politician Community scorecard data is collected in Pascal’s district Pascal takes action with the district supply chain team to identify root causes of the issue Analysis shows 4 clinics in Pascal’s district have stockouts of condoms Pascal is unaware of the stockouts NGO meets with Pascal in his office to share the data Pascal shares the issue with the District Health Executive Team The DHE checks the logistics information system and sees the stockouts were not reported Pascal has limited time and needs something short he can easily share with other DHE members The DHE may see no stockouts in their system and doubt the accuracy of the community data NGO creates a one page brief summarizing the data and recs NGO adds a spot check of stock- on-hand to the scorecard process
  49. 49. Credit toThinkPlace Foundation, from the Innovations for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Initiative’s Care Community Hub
  50. 50. YOUR TURN: JOURNEY MAPS
  51. 51. IDE ATE PROTOTYPE TE S T
  52. 52. Design framework adapted from Stanford d. School From “Applying User-centered Design to Data Use Challenges:What we Learned” https://www.measureevaluation.org/resources/publications/tr-17-161
  53. 53. IDEATE
  54. 54. 70
  55. 55. 73
  56. 56. 74
  57. 57. PROTO TYPE
  58. 58. BONUS Build aTower, Build aTeam |Tom Wujec A TED Talk on teams and prototype thinking with the marshmallow challenge https://www.ted.com/talks/tom_wujec_build_a_tower
  59. 59. TEST
  60. 60. DO’S O F D E S I G N T H I N K I N G F O R D A T A U S E These are reflections from our experience applying design thinking to data use challenges. Every design process is unique.
  61. 61. Use design thinking as a facilitation tool (but not a silver bullet)
  62. 62. Include data use- adjacent participants
  63. 63. Allow enough time to see the design process through
  64. 64. Have a follow up plan (and resources)
  65. 65. DON’TS O F D E S I G N T H I N K I N G F O R D A T A U S E
  66. 66. Rush the process
  67. 67. Rely on one workshop to come to a ‘perfect’ solution.
  68. 68. Design solutions with a tiny group more people = more ideas …to a point
  69. 69. Panic if prototypes are broad when you finish a workshop.
  70. 70. Focus only on the outcome: there’s immense value in the process.
  71. 71. “I am exciting about taking [these activities] forward at a district level to try and change the way people view data, and ultimately, the way districts plan their services within the limited resources they have.” - Provincial Deputy Manager for Planning, KZN
  72. 72. Favorite Resources for Diving in on Design Thinking • Stanford d. School Bootcamp Bootleg dschool.stanford.edu/resources • IDEO Design Kit ideo.com/post/design-kit
  73. 73. Amanda Makulec DataVisualization Lead Excella Consulting amanda.makulec@excella.com @abmakulec Barb Knittel Senior RME Officer John Snow Inc. barbara_knittel@jsi.com Added acknowledgements to Michelle Li (MEASURE Evaluation) and our colleagues at Matchboxology (Cal Bruns and Jason Coetzee) for their invaluable contributions to this work.

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