Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

El programa "Going Digital" de la OCDE

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 36 Anuncio

El programa "Going Digital" de la OCDE

Descargar para leer sin conexión

Presentación de Dirk Pilat, Director Adjunto de la Dirección de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación de la OCDE en el 31º Encuentro de de la Economía Digital y las Telecomunicaciones: La realidad digital de España, celebrado en la UIMP en septiembre de 2017

Presentación de Dirk Pilat, Director Adjunto de la Dirección de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación de la OCDE en el 31º Encuentro de de la Economía Digital y las Telecomunicaciones: La realidad digital de España, celebrado en la UIMP en septiembre de 2017

Anuncio
Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Presentaciones para usted (20)

A los espectadores también les gustó (20)

Anuncio

Similares a El programa "Going Digital" de la OCDE (20)

Más de AMETIC (20)

Anuncio

Más reciente (20)

El programa "Going Digital" de la OCDE

  1. 1. Going Digital – Making the Transformation Work for Growth and Wellbeing 31st Digital Economy and Telecommunications Summit Santander, 4 September 2017 Dirk Pilat Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation dirk.pilat@oecd.org
  2. 2. Outline 1. The Context 2. The Going Digital project 3. Understanding the Digital Transformation 4. Next Steps
  3. 3. 1. CONTEXT
  4. 4. A wide range of new digital technologies have emerged … 4 Cloud computing Blockchain Artificial intelligence 3D printing Big data Internet of Things
  5. 5. 5 …., that are affecting all parts of the economy HealthPublic Admin. Retail TransportationAgriculture Science & Education Manufacturing
  6. 6. Multi-factor productivity growth Total economy, percentage change at annual rate Note: Data for Ireland, Spain and Portugal correspond to the periods 1995-2014 and 2009-2014. Source: OECD Productivity Database, April 2017. Statlink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888933477326 The potential productivity benefits of these new technologies are urgently needed ... -1 0 1 2 3 4 ITA ESP PRT BEL DNK NZL CHE NLD CAN JPN FRA AUT AUS DEU GBR SWE USA FIN IRL KOR 1995-2015 2001-2007 2009-2015
  7. 7. … although today, many firms find it difficult to turn new technology into productivity growth The productivity gap between the globally most productive firms and other firms has widened Note: “Frontier firms” is the average labour productivity (value added per worker) of the 100 or 5% globally most productive firms in each two-digit industry. “Non-frontier firms” is the average of all firms, except the 5% globally most productive firms. Source: OECD preliminary results based on Andrews, D., C. Criscuolo and P. Gal (2016), “Mind the Gap: Productivity Divergence between the Global Frontier and Laggard Firms”, OECD Productivity Working Papers, forthcoming; Orbis database of Bureau van Dijk.
  8. 8. OECD Mobile broadband subscriptions per 100 inhabitants, by technology, December 2016 Source: OECD, Broadband Portal, www.oecd.org/sti/broadband/oecdbroadbandportal.htm Spain has made good progress on broadband access, especially mobile … 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 1.2.2. OECD Mobile broadband subscriptions per 100 inhabitants, by technology, December 2016 Data and voice subscriptions Data-only subscriptions Total (where breakdown not available)
  9. 9. Source: OECD, Broadband Portal, www.oecd.org/sti/broadband/oecdbroadbandportal.htm, July 2017 … and is among the top of the OECD on fibre connections, … 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Percentage of fibre connections in total broadband subscriptions, December 2016
  10. 10. The growth of fibre connections, December 2015- 2016 Source: OECD, Broadband Portal, www.oecd.org/sti/broadband/oecdbroadbandportal.htm, July 2017 .. and among the top in the OECD in the growth of fibre connections 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Annual Growth of fibre subscriptions among countries reporting fibre subscriptions, December 2015-2016%
  11. 11. The diffusion of selected ICT tools and activities in enterprises, 2015 Percentage of enterprises with ten or more persons employed 11Source: OECD, ICT Database; Eurostat, Information Society Statistics Database and national sources, April 2016. But the intensity of ICT use in Spanish business still lags in many areas …
  12. 12. Enterprises using cloud computing services, by size, 2016 As a percentage of enterprises in each employment size class Source: OECD, ICT Database; Eurostat, Information Society Statistics Database and national sources, January 2017. … with small firms lagging, even in technologies well suited to them
  13. 13. Many jobs in Spain will be affected by the digital transformation … Jobs with high and medium potential for automation Percentage of jobs with 70 % and between 50 % et 70 % of substitutable tasks Source: Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC); Arntz et al (2016) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 SVK CZE ITA DEU AUT POL NLD ENG/NIR Average USA ESP NOR DNK CAN IRL SWE FRA JPN BEL(Fl) FIN EST KOR Significant change in tasks Automatable 13
  14. 14. 0 50.000 100.000 150.000 200.000 250.000 300.000 350.000 400.000 450.000 Typesetter and compositor jobs Graphic design jobs … but history suggests new jobs will also emerge, complementary to new technology Source: Presentation by Professor James Bessen at OECD workshop, 24 April.
  15. 15. Individuals who judge their computer skills to be sufficient if they were to apply for a new job within a year, 2013 (as a percentage of all individuals) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 % All Individuals Individuals with high formal education Individuals with no or low formal education Source: OECD Measuring the Digital Economy: A New Perspective, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888933148354. New skills will be needed, …
  16. 16. … which may not be easy for many workers Source: OECD calculations based on the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) (2012 and 2015), www.oecd.org/skills/piaac/publicdataandanalysis . The proportion of low performers in literacy and/or numeracy, workers Few high-skilled workers Many workers lacking ICT skills 16 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 % Inbothliteracyandnumeracy Inliteracyonly Innumeracyonly
  17. 17. Individuals using the Internet for sending filled forms via public authorities websites in the past 12 months, by education level, 2015 Source: OECD, ICT Database; Eurostat, Information Society Statistics Database and ITU, World Telecommunication/ICT indicators Database, July 2015; Government at a Glance (2017 forthcoming). Government itself will also need to be transformed
  18. 18. 2. THE OECD’S GOING DIGITAL PROJECT
  19. 19. Digitalisation has been on the OECD’s agenda for some time – e.g. Ministerial Conference in Cancun, June 2016 …
  20. 20. … and is now also firmly on the G20 agenda, with support from the OECD The OECD launched its Going Digital project at the joint OECD- G20 conference on Key Issues for Digital Transformation in the G20, on 12 January in Berlin. A background report was prepared by the OECD. It laid the path for the first ever G20 Digital Ministers meeting, that took place in Dusseldorf on 6-7 April.
  21. 21. But we need a more strategic and pro- active approach to digitalisation • Critical thresholds have been crossed • Shift from an economic focus to socio-economic; all sectors of the economy are affected • Huge potential • But realisation that digitally induced change will be disruptive for many workers, firms and sectors. • In many countries, a gap between Technology 4.0, and Policy 1.0
  22. 22. Background • The 2016 OECD Ministerial Council Meeting encouraged the development of a horizontal policy strategy on digitalisation. • The Going Digital project involves 14 core OECD Committees, i.e. the Digital Economy Policy Committee (lead), the Competition Committee, the Committee on Consumer Policy, the Committee on Industry, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, the Insurance and Private Pensions Committee, the Committee on Financial Markets, the Committee on Fiscal Affairs, the Committee on Scientific and Technological Policy, the Committee on Statistics and Statistics Policy, the Economic Policy Committee, the Education Policy Committee, the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee, the Public Governance Committee, and the Trade Committee. 22
  23. 23. 1. Improve our understanding of the digital transformation and its impacts on economy and society 2. Provide policymakers with the tools needed to develop a pro-active, whole-of-government policy response to help their economies prosper in an increasingly digital and data-driven world. 3. Help overcome the large gap between technology and policy development, Technology 4.0 – Policy 1.0. Objectives
  24. 24. Three Areas of Work: 1. Development of an Integrated Policy Framework Building the Foundations for the Digital Transformation Making the Digital Transformation Work for the Economy & Society Effective Use (Firms) Policy Coherence and Strategy Development Digital Government (Governments) Trust & Acceptance (Firms, People) Labour Market Adaptation (People) Framework Conditions (including Market Openness) Accessible Digital Infrastructures and Services Innovation & Effects (Sectors) Well-being (People)
  25. 25. • Enrich understanding of the digital transformation in specific policy areas, e.g. financial markets, insurance, taxation, etc. 2: In-depth work on the digital transformation in specific areas
  26. 26. 3: Cross-cutting work on some of the big policy questions 1. Jobs & Skills: • Characterise skills needs and demands; • Assess the implication of automation for jobs and skills; • Identify and (re)think policies addressing challenges of Going Digital for jobs and skills. 2. Productivity, competition & market openness: • implications for firms, business dynamics and productivity • implications for competition, financing, market openness & taxation • role of framework policies, especially for adoption 3. Well-being: Impacts on • Material conditions, e.g. job displacement; scalable jobs; choice, consumer surplus, etc. • Quality of life: health; skills; work-life balance; social connections; environment ; civic engagement; etc. 4. Measurement: • Review current indicators and frameworks, identify gaps, explore digital sources; develop a measurement roadmap. • Scope: Data value and international flows; Skills in the digital era; Trust in online environments.
  27. 27. 3. ENHANCING OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION
  28. 28. Digitalisation also changes the functioning of the economy, challenging policy … Policy has difficulty in adjusting to a digital era, for example: • The high speed of change • The changing nature of capital • The growing mobility of value creation • The empowerment of individuals, crowds, SMEs and regions • And others ….
  29. 29. The high speed of digital transformation, … Graph showing the time it took different technologies to reacch X amount of users Challenges legacy policies and slow policy making - speed may promote policy “arbitrage“ strategies 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Smartphones Internet Mobile phone Personal computer Television Radio Telephone Electricity Source: US Census, Wall Street Journal Years until used by 25% of US population
  30. 30. … the changing nature of capital, … Intangible assets Servicificat ion Challenges policies directed at capital, e.g. tax incentives or accounting rules, trade policy (goods vs services)
  31. 31. … the growing mobility of value creation, … Challenges policies that rely on geographical location, e.g. education, corporate and labour tax, trade rules of origin
  32. 32. … or the empowerment of individuals, crowds, SMEs and regions Enables entrepreneurship and engagement with crowds, challenges policies that rely on a central point of control (e.g. media)
  33. 33. 4. CONCLUSIONS
  34. 34. • The World (and Spain) is facing a massive economic and social transformation, driven by a wide range of new technologies and business models • This offers many new opportunities for stronger productivity growth, new jobs, and new solutions to help address global and social challenges. • But these potential benefits are not automatic and will require a comprehensive and pro-active policy response; leadership and vision will be key. • There is a growing gap between technology (4.0) and policy (1.5) - policy will need to move to a digital era – better understanding the changes will help. • There is much scope for learning across countries. Key points
  35. 35. 1. Ensure the rolling out fibre networks to every citizen and firm 2. Foster the scaling of new digital business models and start-up firms; and ensure sound competition 3. Facilitate the diffusion of technology and knowledge across the economy, notably to SMEs 4. Adapt regulatory frameworks to the digital age 5. Facilitate digital trade 6. Support skills development to ensure nobody is left behind 7. Foster digital innovation by investing in the future 8. Protect privacy, security and consumers rights 9. Leverage digital technologies within government 10. Support workers displaced by the digital transformation Ten policies to benefit from the digital transformation
  36. 36. Thank you 36 Contact: dirk.pilat@oecd.org Twitter: @OECDinnovation and @PilatSTI Going Digital website: http://oe.cd/goingdigital

×