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Sustainable fishing

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Sustainable fishing

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This presentation introduces the concept of sustainable fishing and provides different organizations that also are being sustainably conscious about fishing. They even present how this is done in Alaska and in Hilo.

This presentation introduces the concept of sustainable fishing and provides different organizations that also are being sustainably conscious about fishing. They even present how this is done in Alaska and in Hilo.

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Sustainable fishing

  1. 1. Sustainable Fishing A lesson we can’t afford not to learn
  2. 2. What is sustainable fishing and why is it important? Sustainable fishing is the act of fishing in a way that the practices can be maintained without reducing the target species and maintaining its population and without harming the ecosystem. Sustainable fisheries target species that can reproduce quickly and sustain their own population. Studies show that if current rates of fishing continue, there will be no edible fish in the ocean in 2048. Overfishing of species can have repercussions for the food chain. It also can inflict damage on organisms such as coral.
  3. 3. Sustainability must be applied to all aspects of the ecosystem. The ocean comprises of 140 million miles and 71% of the Earth’s surface. Fish are by far the highest percentage of proteins consumed by humans. Overfishing seriously compromises the delicate balance of the ocean and creates a disastrous chain effect which threatens to weaken the entire aquatic ecosystem. Furtive efforts are underway to address overfishing through sustainable methods such as controlled fisheries and controlled commercial fishing activity. Educating the public shows them the importance in selecting seafood raised through sustainable methods. Support for these eco-friendly fisheries will encourage the spread of similar methods throughout the fishing industry.
  4. 4. Ten commandments for ecosystem- based fisheries Keep a perspective that is holistic and adaptive. Maintain an “old growth” structure in fish populations, since big, old and fat female fish have been shown to be the best spawners, but are also susceptible to overfishing. Characterize and maintain the equilibrium of fish stocks, so that management boundaries match natural boundaries in the sea. Monitor and maintain seafloor habitats to make sure fish have food and shelter. Maintain resilient ecosystems that are able to withstand occasional shocks. Identify and maintain critical food-web connections, including predators and forage species. Adapt to ecosystem changes through time, both short-term and on longer cycles of decades or centuries, including global climate change. Account for evolutionary changes caused by fishing, which tends to remove large, older fish. Include the actions of humans and their social and economic systems in all ecological equations
  5. 5. Friends of the Sea Sustainable Fishery Guidelines: There is no environmental impact where the farm is placed Must follow all waste water guidelines A very low percentage of fish escaping fishery. No genetically modified organisms, growth hormones, or antibiotics Reduction of the carbon footprint 85 percent of the world’s fisheries are fished at or beyond their maximum sustainable limit
  6. 6. GMO is when an organism’s genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Purpose? Luxury & to increase seafood consumption to meet demands of food industry. Negative effects: Release of untreated wastes & nutrients, increase risk of disease & parasite transmission from farmed to wild fish, use & release of drugs & chemicals in environment, & over-fishing of smaller fishes to feed carnivorous farmed fishes (Salmon). People aren’t the only consumers part taking in over-fishing. Species aren’t given the chance to grow because they’re being used for consumption for larger fishes in farms. Not given the chance to adulthood and to reproduce, fish species are declining.
  7. 7. Holistics as it pertains to sustainable fisheries Holistics is characterized by comprehension of the parts of something as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole. In medicine, holistic healing means to take account of someone’s whole body, such as mind and soul, verses just the disease. In sustainable fishing, we cannot only think about fishing and the fish, we must think about the whole body. If we view the ocean at a holistic medicine view, the ocean is the body and the fish is the disease. It’s the ocean we must be concerned and what can harm it. Pollution, debris, climate change, tourism and development, are all factors to causing disease to the ocean. We must care for the ocean in order to care for the fish. Nutritionists say that eating fish is a healthy protein to add to your diet. It’s also a great way to add Omega 3’s to your diet too. Within the past 50 years, technology has allowed us to enter the ocean. We are able to fish deeper and more effectively. Today we have lost 90% of large predatory fish such as sharks and cods.
  8. 8. The Marine Resilient Ecosystem Resilience is the capacity an ecosystem has to respond to a disturbance by resisting damage and recovering. The ecosystems are changing every time & vulnerable to natural & human caused stressors. Ex: Extreme weather, fishing pressure, pollution, & habitat loss. Example: In Western Australia up to 90% live corals were lost due to severe bleaching. Despite the loss, reef was able to grow back 44% within 12 years. Scientists find climate change to be the greatest stressor to coastal ecosystems.
  9. 9. Apps are starting to be developed and launched to direct consumers to sustainable fishing products. The Monterey Bay Aquarian app will even uses GPS to direct you to restaurants that serves sustainable seafood.
  10. 10. Volunteer sites Jenna and Nicole visited Hilo Fish Company located in Hilo, Hawaii on Friday November, 3 2017. Sam visited Nisqually Fishery and Salmon Hatchery located in Lacey Washington on the Nisqually Wildlife Reserve November, 15 2017
  11. 11. The Nisqually Tribe has existed for over 10,000 years on over 2 million acres along the Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest. Much like Hawaiians, the tribe’s main sustenance was fishing and like Hawaiians that resource has steadily become depleted due to overfishing and land seizing. Concerted efforts have established a sustainable fish hatchery with the intent to regain control of the declining salmon population and reinvigorate the resource that is such a part of the Nisqually culture.
  12. 12. Yil-me-hu, Nisqually word that means “the salmon dance, on its first arrival A hundred years ago Puget Sound was a major wild salmon highway, with five different species returning to the 14 rivers that run into the Sound Now after a century of overfishing and dams the chinook in the river or now virtually extinct requiring the Nisqually’s to develop a sustainable fishery
  13. 13. Nisqually sustainable hatchery is located in the Puget Sound estuary, second largest in the united States In the restoration, urban rain gardens filter runoff and augment river flow, new logjams deepen and cool its waters, and farms returned to marshland provide new places for young salmon to shelter and grow.
  14. 14. Nisqually Glacier provides water for the Nisqually river Now after a century of overfishing and dams the chinook in the river or now virtually extinct requiring the Nisqually tribe to develop a sustainable fishery
  15. 15. Larry Hicks, Nisqually computer tech and fishery volunteer explains the process to me of the fishery. First step is isolating the chinook female and baby population in order to preserve lineage. The fish are then wrangled into a holding pen, further sorted, then released into the hatcheries estuary for safe development.
  16. 16. We just viewed The Nisqually Fishery and Hatchery which represents the production side of the sustainable fishing industry Now, we will take a look at The Hilo Fish Company which represents the processing and distribution of the end product.
  17. 17. HILO FISH COMPANY, INC. is a leading importer and processor of fresh and frozen seafood in the United States. Through global sourcing from over 20 coastal regions,our operations support the seafood needs of a wide range of clientele that includes restaurants, regional grocery chains, the national broadline food distributors and other various sized businesses involved with food. Hilo Fish Company is headquartered in Hilo, Hawaii. We maintain satellite sales offices in Los Angeles, California and Perth Amboy, New Jersey. In April of 2006, the Company opened a regional procurement office in Manila, Philippines to handle all purchases in Asia.
  18. 18. Hilo Fish Company Mission Statement Our mission is to consistently provide the best quality products and services to our customers while operating our business with: •Pride and Humility •Quality and Integrity •Excellence and Innovation •Trust and Honesty •Care and Unity Hilo Fish Company, Inc. is engaged in worldwide distribution, processing, harvesting and marketing of assorted fresh and frozen seafood products. We possess an in-depth knowledge of the major fisheries targeting tuna and other highly migratory species. We source from over 20 different coastal regions
  19. 19. Charles Umamoto was able to give us a brief tour of Hilo Fish Company, which are one of the many sales offices across the country. Their success is accomplished by work closely with all business partners in order to provide technical training in seafood harvesting, handling, and processing procedures.
  20. 20. We asked Charles how his company regulates and verifies sustainability? Answer: It’s about traceability. Getting accurate information and traceability on where and how the snapper and grouper fish are coming here. These fish need to come from a reliable origin and from sources that aren’t abusing the ocean. This storage room needs to be below 40 degrees.
  21. 21. Hilo Fish Company has entered the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) and together they are working on a project called Fishery Improvement Project (FIP). This project is to help protect and sustain the grouper and snapper fishes. Picture: A worker at Hilo Fish is weighing and packing cut fish to deliver.
  22. 22. Here is a quick video. It was so cold, I don’t know how the workers can handle it. Please double click
  23. 23. The amount of fish that Hilo Fish Company sees a day varies. It depends on the season and if they fish are biting. They only catch fish that is appropriate size and if the fish are healthy.
  24. 24. Hawaiians caught three times more fish than current sustainable thresholds yet were able to maintain the fish population for over 400 years. Native Hawaiians caught 50% more fish as compared to modern fleets of today From 1400 to 1800, Hawaiians caught 15 metric tons of fish per square kilometer of reef annually which is 5 times the amount of modern island nations. Hawaiians used sustainable techniques back then that are currently being implemented today: Temporary or permanent bans Catch limits Restriction on species and fishing techniques Big difference is consequences of violating policies were more severe and included up to death. Hawaiians and Fishing Sustainability
  25. 25. What we can do to help If the fish are too small, release it. If the fish is unfamiliar, release it. We can educate the keiki on how important it is to not overfish. Take a break from eating seafood.
  26. 26. Work Cited Hilborn R (2008) "Knowledge on how to achieve sustainable fisheries" Pages 45–56 , Fisheries for Global Welfare and Environment, 5th World Fisheries Congress 2008. Grafton, RQ; Hilborn, R; (2008). "Positioning fisheries in a changing world" (PDF). Marine Policy (United Kingdom). 32: 630–634. doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2007.11.003. Charles, A. T. (2008). Sustainable fishery systems. John Wiley & Sons. https://smartbeing.wordpress.com/2010/01/18/why-sustainable-fishing-is-important/ Company, I. H. (n.d.). Hilo Fish Company, Inc. Retrieved October 22, 2017, from http://www.hilofish.com Fisheries, N. (n.d.). Ecosystems. Retrieved December 01, 2017, from https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/topic/ecosystems GE Fish & the Environment. (n.d.). Retrieved December 01, 2017, from https://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/309/ge-fish/ge-fish-and-the-environment ‘. https://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/23/ancient-hawaiians-caught-more-by-fishing-less/

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