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Implementing Scrum with Microsoft Team Foundation Service (TFS)

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Day one Implementing Scrum with Microsoft Team Foundation Service (TFS) training covering the following topics:
TFS Overview
TFS Version Comparison and Installation
Setting Up Your Code in TFS Source Control
Setting Up Your Code in Git Source Control
Scrum Overview
Sprint 0 Activities
Sprint Planning Exercise
Summary and Wrap Up

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Implementing Scrum with Microsoft Team Foundation Service (TFS)

  1. 1. Day I Implementing Scrum with Microsoft Team Foundation Service (TFS)
  2. 2. Ben Hoelting In truth, he’s just a big kid. He loves designing systems that solve real world problems. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing something you helped develop being used by the end users. Ben is also involved in the technology community and runs the South Colorado .NET user group. He also enjoys speaking at tech groups and events around the country. Ben Hoelting @benhnet b.hoelting@aspenware.com
  3. 3. Day I Agenda • TFS Overview • TFS Version Comparison and Installation • Setting Up Your Code in TFS Source Control • Setting Up Your Code in Git Source Control • Scrum Overview • Sprint 0 Activities • Sprint Planning Exercise • Summary and Wrap Up 3Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  4. 4. TFS Overview and Initial Setup 4Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  5. 5. What is Team Foundation Service?
  6. 6. Team Foundation Service Core Capabilities
  7. 7. Agile Planning & Management 7
  8. 8. Web UI Access burndown, task tracking, team notices 8
  9. 9. Work Items 9
  10. 10. Build Management & Automation Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 10
  11. 11. Easy (no infrastructure) Supports testing (multiple frameworks) Supports 3rd party binaries (in version control or via NuGet) Software & completion restrictions Continuous deployment to Azure, automatically Using the Hosted Build Controller
  12. 12. Version Control Enterprise-class Version control Version anything, integrated check-in, annotation, distributed teams support, shared check-outs, check-in policies. Sync with Git Flexible branching & merging Path-space branching, branch visualization, merge tracking Collaborative Annotation, code reviews, inline compare/merge Focused on productivity Online/offline, bridges with other VC tools, shelving, VS suspend/resume 12
  13. 13. TFS Version Comparison & Installation 13Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  14. 14. Frank Mbanusi Frank is a United States Marine. It’s no wonder that he’s driven by mission accomplishment. He is committed to cultivating healthy and trusting relationships with our clients – It’s about people! Frank enjoys his family, friends, fitness, and music. Frank Mbanusi Strategic Account Executive f.mbanusi@aspenware.com @vMbanusi
  15. 15. Team Foundation Server Editions 15 • Team Foundation Server Express • Team Foundation Server • Team Foundation Service (tfs.visualstudio.com) Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  16. 16. Team Foundation Server Express – Pros 16 • Free • Data stays in network • Comes with version control repository • More control compared to TF Service • Process and Work Item template customization • CAL option if team grows beyond 5 users • Support for express versions of VS Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  17. 17. Team Foundation Server Express – Cons 17 • Must have own hardware or virtual machine • Not accessible from anywhere • Basic installation on one machine only – no scale • Limited Agile PM features and tools • No SharePoint or Reporting Services integration • Supports only SQL Server Express Edition • Database maintenance • Licensing for OS and CALs if required Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  18. 18. Team Foundation Server – Pros 18 • Full integration with products like SharePoint and SQL Server Reporting Services • Supports higher end versions of SQL Server for the backend, as well as Express • Supports the express versions of Visual Studio and other non- Microsoft products (CALs may be required) • CAL License is included with certain Visual Studio subscriptions (Pro, Prem, and Ult) Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  19. 19. Team Foundation Server – Cons 19 • Must have own hardware and/or virtual machines • Requires installation and configuration • Requires purchased CALs as needed • More expensive for small teams • Not accessible from anywhere (unless published externally) Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  20. 20. Team Foundation Service – Pros 20 • No installation – up and running in minutes • No hardware or software • Data stored in triplicate on three physically distinct servers • No backup management • Service accessible from anywhere around the world • Updated every 3 weeks • No licensing required when using express versions of VS or non-Microsoft platforms such as Eclipse or Xcode • Scalable Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  21. 21. Team Foundation Service – Cons 21 • Free for up to 5 users (no paid version plan yet) • No Active Directory support • Performance with file transfers depending on connection speed • Data is not inside your network • No process template or work item template customization • No SharePoint integration • No Lab environment • Limited reports – can’t deploy custom reports • Limited migration path from TFS on prem to TF Service Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  22. 22. TFS On-Premise vs. Cloud (TF Service) Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 22 Team Foundation Server Team Foundation Service
  23. 23. System Requirements for TFS • Operating System Requirements • 64-bit versions of Server 2008 SP2, Server 2008 R2 SP2 and 64-bit Server 2012 • Server Core not supported • Client Operating Systems • 64-bit or 32-bit versions of Windows 7 SP1 and Windows 8 • Hardware Recommendations • Fewer than 250 users – Single Server, 1 x single core 2.13GHz, 2GB, 125GB/7.2k rpm • 250 – 500 users – Single Server, 1 x dual core 2.13GHz, 4GB, 300GB/10k rpm • 500 – 2,200 users – Dual Server, 1 x dual core Intel Xeon 2.13GHz, 4GB, 500GB/7.2k rpm – SQL: 1 x quad Intel Xeon 2.33GHz, 4GB, 500GB/7.2k rpm • SharePoint hardware recommendations • Virtualization recommendations – Microsoft support • http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/dd578592.aspx 23Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  24. 24. Active Directory Requirements • Domain or Workgroup members supported • Supported Functional Levels • Windows 2000 native mode • Windows Server 2003 mode • Windows Server 2008 mode 24Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  25. 25. SQL Server Requirements for TFS • Supported Editions • SQL Server 2008 R2 Express, Standard and Enterprise SP1 CU1 • SQL Server 2012 Express, Standard and Enterprise • Features required • Database Engine Service • Full-Text Search • Reporting features required • Reporting Services (Native for 2012) • Analysis Services • Authentication • Windows • Service account • Domain or Local built in account 25Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  26. 26. Configuration Options for TFS • Basic Configuration • Install SQL Server Express or Use an existing SQL Server instance • Standard Configuration • Domain account required for SP service account (also used as Report Reader account) • Member of Administrators security group • Best practices around service accounts (SP, SQL, TFS) - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en- us/library/vstudio/dd578625.aspx • Advanced Configuration • Multiple server configuration • No built-in accounts for service accounts • Ensure supported hardware/software • Ensure proper permissions and service accounts • Set up SQL (SSRS, SSAS), SharePoint (w/ TFS and TFS Extensions), and TFS (TFS Config Tool) • https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/307722 26Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  27. 27. Setting Up Your Code in TFS Source Control 27Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  28. 28. Branching, in revision control and software configuration management, is the duplication of an object under revision control (such as a source code file, or a directory tree) so that modifications can happen in parallel along both branches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branching_(software) Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 28
  29. 29. Forward Integration (FI) & Reverse Integration (RI) DEVELOPMENT MAIN Branch Reverse Forward Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 29
  30. 30. It’s All About the Main Branch Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 30
  31. 31. Creating Main Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 31
  32. 32. Development Branch •Changes for next version of work. Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 32
  33. 33. Adding Code Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 33
  34. 34. Setting Up Your Code using Git Source Control 34Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  35. 35. Ely Lucas e.lucas@aspenware.com || Senior Software Developer Ely is a software developer by day and ninja by night. He has over 10 years experience delivering cutting edge solutions and sneaking around unnoticed. He enjoys sharing his knowledge with others, technology, being outdoors and levitating objects with his mind. He lives in Denver with his wife, son and dog.
  36. 36. Git is an open source distributed version control system designed for speed and efficiency Git is an open source distributed version control system designed for speed and efficiency Git is an open source distributed version control system designed for speed and efficiency Git is an open source distributed version control system designed for speed and efficiency What Is Git? Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 36
  37. 37. Central Source Control Server Repo Version 3 Version 2 Version 1 Developer A Developer B File File Checkout Checkout Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 37
  38. 38. Developer A Repo Version 3 Version 2 Version 1 Developer B Repo Version 3 Version 2 Version 1 Developer C Repo Version 3 Version 2 Version 1 Server Repo Version 3 Version 2 Version 1
  39. 39. Common Git commands • Init • Add • Commit • Branch • Checkout • Merge • Push/Pull • Status • Reset Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I 39
  40. 40. Break 40Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  41. 41. Scrum Overview 41Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  42. 42. Ken Payne k.payne@aspenware.com || Delivery Director || 303.590.4390 Ken gets inspiration and energy by working alongside smart, creative people solving tough business problems and wowing clients. He believes great solutions evolve through focused collaboration and strongly supports the notion that "innovation is a team sport."
  43. 43. Scrum is Value Driven 43 Constraints Variable Plan Driven Value Driven Features Cost Schedule FeaturesCost Schedule Traditional Scrum Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  44. 44. Scrum is Iterative 44 Sprint Planning Sprint Review Scrum Update the Task Code Check-in Product Vision Product Backlog Sprint Backlog 2 – 4 weeks 24 hours Sprint Retrospective Test Potentially Shippable* Product Backlog Grooming “Scrum 0” Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  45. 45. Scrum is Iterative and Incremental 45 Drawings by Jeff Patton Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  46. 46. Scrum Teams are Cross-Functional 46 The Scrum team is self-organizing and cross-functional with all the skills necessary to create a product increment Product OwnerScrum MasterDevelopment Team Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  47. 47. Scrum is simple… 47 …to understand, difficult to do well Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  48. 48. Estimating Precision 48 Accuracy Understanding Themes or Epics (T-shirt sizes) User Stories (Story points) Tasks (Hours) Future SprintRelease / Product “There's no sense in being precise when you don't even know what you're talking about.” – John von Neumann Priority Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  49. 49. Sprint 0 Activities 49Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  50. 50. Sally Tait s.tait@aspenware.com || Senior Consultant || 303.798.5458 Sally is a problem solver and information collector. From optimizing the way her kitchen is organized to modeling complex business processes, she is compelled to design systems that simplify getting things done.
  51. 51. Sprint 0: Definition 51 Sprint 0: Discovery Sprint 1,2,3: Development Sprint 4: Release • Meet with key stakeholders to build the product backlog. • Set up Development and QA environments. • Set up the baseline architecture, continuous integration architecture and framework for nightly deployments • Set up project infrastructure and conventions, schedule project activity and track and report progress. 1 week 12 weeks 1 week • Perform sprint planning • Complete work item tasks • Run daily standups, schedule project activity, and track and report progress. • Perform unit and integration testing. • Auto deploy nightly • QA test daily • Perform end of Sprint demo • Perform sprint retrospective • Provide technical and user support for release • Run daily standups, schedule project activity, and track and report progress Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  52. 52. Sprint 0: Project and Team Definition • Project Templates • Agile • Scrum • CMMI (traditional waterfall) • Teams and Areas • Flexible categorization of the work • Teams are used to segment groups of people • Areas can be used to segment the work 52Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  53. 53. Sprint 0: Set Up Iterations (Sprints) • Sprints or Iterations • Timeboxes of work from the backlog • Each should each have same duration • Look at velocity to determine scope of each sprint • Releases • Each sprint will produce “shippable” code. • Several sprints may be completed before an actual release. 53Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  54. 54. Demo: Projects, Teams, Areas and Iterations 54Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  55. 55. Sprint 0: Define the Backlog • Product Backlog • Contains requirements, ideas, wish list, enhancements, bugs, etc. • Anyone can add to the product backlog. • Only the Product Owner can prioritize the product backlog. • TFS has security settings and alerts to manage this if desired. 55Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  56. 56. Sprint 0: Define the Backlog • Work Item Types in TFS • Product Backlog Item (PBI) – Requirement or Desired Feature • Task - Thing to do related to PBI • Bug - Defect or issue found in the application • Impediment - something that is causing a delay • Test Case - List of steps a tester should take to validate a PBI 56Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  57. 57. Sprint 0: Define the Backlog • User Story Format • Backlog items should be expressed in business terms. • Most common format is user story: As a [role], I want to [do something], so that I can [achieve a desired result] 57Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  58. 58. Demo Adding PBIs 58Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  59. 59. Sprint 0: Size and Prioritize • Sizing the Product Backlog Items • Sizing is a team effort. • Rather than ask "how long will it take," you ask, "how big is it?“ • Common to use the Fibonacci sequence. • 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144... • Simplified variation: 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 20, 40 (no higher) • Backlog prioritization • Only the Product Owner may prioritize the backlog. • Simple list order, rather than 1, 2, 3 categories. 59Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  60. 60. Demo Sizing and Prioritization 60Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  61. 61. Break 61Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  62. 62. Sprint Planning 62Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  63. 63. Plan the Sprint • If not already determined, determine the duration and number of sprints • Establish the sprint goal • Add PBIs to the sprint from the prioritized backlog • Set team capacity • Add tasks and task estimates to PBIs • Resolve over-allocations • Commit!* 63Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  64. 64. Sprint Planning Demo 64Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  65. 65. Wrap up • What we talked about • TFS Overview • TFS Version Comparison and Installation • Setting Up Your Code in TFS Source Control • Setting Up Your Code in Git Source Control • Scrum Overview • Sprint 0 Activities • Sprint Planning Exercise • Review items in the Parking Lot • Visit http://www.aspenware.com/blog for the slides and any additional resources • B.Hoelting@Aspenware.com 65Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I
  66. 66. End of Day I 66Aspenware: Scrum with TFS – Day I

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