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Business English for PR

  1. 1. Vocabulary and Expressions to enhance your performance Auxiliadora González 2015
  2. 2. English is definitely the universal language in business: foreign investment and entertaining and corporate events are driven by negotiations and paperwork in this language. As a Central American PR firm representing the most important companies in the region, CCK and its affiliated partners (representatives, providers, allies, etc.) are expected to conduct positive meetings and results in English.
  3. 3. • Weak vocabulary • Poor fluency • Lack of strategy • Nervousness • Cultural differences • Wrong attitude
  4. 4. Recognize a word and learn its meaning Can you explain it or translate it? Pronounce it properly Have you check it online or with a native or ESL speaker? Place the word in context so you know when you can employ it Can I use it with my friends or with my boss? Produce an example and have someone check it Can you put the word in a sentence? Repeat vocabulary until it comes automatically to your mind Will you recall it in the middle of a discussion?
  5. 5. • Advertising • Announcements • Audio Releases • Charity/Corporate social responsibility • Conferences • Coverage • Documents or Key Messages and Positioning • Email Flashes • Employee interactions on a regular basis • Events/Functions • Hosted Visits • Launch • Media conference • Newsletters • Open day • Press Appointments • Press Kits • Press Release • Press Trips • Press/Media Tours • Private Demos • Product testing • Public Forums • Sales promotions • Seminars • Speaking Engagements • Teleconferences • Walk-ins • Websites
  6. 6. 1 2 3 4 6 5 Title or headline and subtitle Lead Body (includes quotes) Boilerplate Contact information Text box 7 Letterhead (logo)
  7. 7. 1 Name plate Cover 2 Headline 3 Lead 4 Jumpline 5 Cutline or Caption 6 Photo Credit 8 By-line 9 Deck 7 Graphic (photo, image or graph)
  8. 8. Starting a Meeting • Let’s get started! • We need to discuss … • Is everyone ready? • Time to begin. Presenting Data • I’d like you to see ... • Let me show you (…). • Please observe that … • Watch this (…) • Here you have (…) Explaining Why • The reason ... • My aim is … • What I’d like (you to see) is • My objective is …
  9. 9. Providing detail • To elaborate … • Here I have further information. • Let me expand (on that). • Let me tell you a bit more. • What’s more, … Requesting Data • Could you provide (…)? • Why don’t you (…)? • Can you illustrate that? • What evidence (…)? • How will you back that up? Emphasizing on a Point • This is a key issue. • I’d like to emphasize on … • This is significant [be sure to provide a reason]. • It is vital that … • It’s imperative that …
  10. 10. Keeping a meeting on track • That’s another subject. • We can’t discuss that issue. • That’s outside the scope. • Let’s get back on track. • We’re digressing. Coming Back to a Topic • Where were we? • What were you saying? • As I was explaining, … • Return to … • This leads us back to … Postponing an Issue • Let’s leave that for later. • It’s too late to … • Shall we leave it for …? • Let’s postpone that until …
  11. 11. Moving forward or changing the topic • Shall we proceed to the next point? • Let’s move on. • By the way … • Can we move onto … ? • Now it’s time to … • There’s another issue we need to deal with. Explore Options • Let’s look at … • Why don’t we consider … ? • What about … ? • We have several choices. • We could either … or … Proposing Solutions • Maybe we should … • How about … • Why don’t you … • The best way is to … • I would … • I wouldn’t …
  12. 12. Asking for Repetition • Sorry, I didn’t catch that. • I missed that. • Pardon me? • Excuse me. What did you say? • Could you please repeat that? Checking for Agreement • Do we agree? • Do we all share? • Are you all with me? • Is there anyone who has a different opinion? • Shall we pass the motion? Agreeing • Exactly! • Correct. • I agree. • I have to agree. • That’s how I feel.
  13. 13. Disagreeing Strongly • I don’t agree. • You’re not right. • It’s not what I believe. • I don’t think so. • That’s not such a good idea. Disagreeing Less Strongly • I don’t mean to be rude, but … • I wouldn’t do that. • Correct me if I’m mistaken. • Don’t get me wrong, but … • I’m not so keen on … Disagreeing Partially • I see your point of view, but … • You might be right. However … • You have a good point, though … • You could say that but … • Up to a point I agree. Nevertheless …
  14. 14. Asking for Clarification • What do you mean (by …)? • Could you (please) clarify? • Could you (please) explain? • I didn’t understand. • I didn’t get that / I can´t grasp it • I don´t follow / I’m not following. • I’m not sure I get the idea Opening Space for questions • Would you like to ask something? • Do you have any doubt? • Is it clear? • I’m ready to answer any question. • Is there anything you’d like to (know/ask/get more information about)? Interrupting • Sorry to interrupt. • Could I make a comment? • May I come in here? • Can I add something?
  15. 15. Giving Clues When You Change a Subject • I’d like to move onto … • From now on, I’ll deal with … • May we start discussing … ? • I believe this is the right time to … • It has just crossed my mind to … • From now on I’ll talk about … • There’s something else to discuss. • To bring up another topic … • The next point today is … • Changing focus, I want to … • Before I forget … • On quite another matter, …
  16. 16. Introducing your ideas • From my point of view, … • Let me tell you that … • Apparently, … • In my opinion … • It seems that … • As a matter of fact … • In fact … • I’d like to remind you that … • It sounds as if … • According to what I know… • Essentially • At first sight, … • On the face of it … I’d like to remind you that sales are still weak. In my opinion, the division head must resign now At first sight at least, this contract is not very well written.
  17. 17. Finishing • I’d like to conclude by (progressive verb –ing-) … • That’s all. • We’ll have to leave it for now. • Shall we call it a day? Correcting Speakers • There’s a misunderstanding. • This isn’t what I meant. • I’m sorry about the confusion. Summarizing • To put it briefly. • In a few words. • To summarize/In summary. • It all comes down to …
  18. 18. Combining auxiliaries and adverbs will allow you to define probability and be more precise. Auxiliary Adverb Example Will Sure, definitely, certainly, doubtlessly, inevitably, absolutely She will definitely fail. No one has done that before. Should Likely, probably, seemingly He should probably make it. He trained hard enough. Can Could Possible, perhaps, possibly, feasibly, maybe. We could win if we train hard enough. I could perhaps help you on condition you say nothing to Jill. May Might Unlikely (might is less probable). They may win. Our team is in low form today. They might win. Their team isn't very good but you never know… Won’t Can’t Impossible, never He just won’t do it. She never changes her mind once she’s made a decision.
  19. 19. When explaining graphs or changes, you can use the following verbs: Situation Verbs Describing general increase Increase, improve, raise, rise, grow Describe gradual increase Accumulate, escalate, accrue, build up, develop Describe sudden increase Boost, shoot up, spring up, surge, multiply Describe general fall Fall, decline, descend, climb down, decrease, reduce Describe gradual fall Diminish, weaken, shrink, wane, slip Describe sudden fall Dive, plunge, plummet, sink, collapse, Describe fluctuation Fluctuate, be unstable, change, swing, vary Describe stability Be stable, remain unchained, keep steady, stay constant, continue
  20. 20. 1. To go hand in hand (together; along with) 2. To be in the same boat (in the same situation) 3. To multi-task (do many things at once) 4. To be between a rock and a hard place (a dilemma; two possibilities that are not good) 5. To blow away (affect intensely; overwhelm). 6. Ahead of the game (successful) 7. Game plan (the strategy of reaching an objective) 8. A long shot (something that will probably not succeed but is worth trying) 9. To burn out (to exhaust physically or mentally) 10. To miss the boat (miss an opportunity) 11. To land on your feet (to do well; to succeed) 12. To take the bull by the horns (to confront a problem head on) 52 Most Common Business Idioms from the New York Times to Make Your Business English Spectacular
  21. 21. 13. To be on the same page (have the same understanding or knowledge) 14. To see eye to eye (to be in agreement) 15. Think out of the box (to think differently from a new perspective) 16. Water under the bridge (something that has happened and can’t be changed) 17. A win-win situation (a situation in which everyone participating come out on top; everyone wins or gets what they want) 18. To take off (move ahead and do well) 19. To get in the black (become profitable) 20. To be “in the red” (having losses) 21. To kickback (rest and enjoy your time) 22. To stay on your toes (pay attention and be aware) 52 Most Common Business Idioms from the New York Times to Make Your Business English Spectacular
  22. 22. 23. To troubleshoot (solve problems) 24. To raise the bar (to raise standards or expectations) 25. To play it by ear (decide to deal with something how it happens rather than planning) 26. To punch to the gut (give it all you’ve got) 27. To hold your horses (slow down and wait or move slowly) 28. To drop the ball (fail to do your job or to do well) 29. To keep pace (continue on) 30. You can’t have your cake and eat it, too (you can’t have it both ways; you can’t have the best of both worlds) 31. To stay on top of things (learn and know what’s happening) 52 Most Common Business Idioms from the New York Times to Make Your Business English Spectacular
  23. 23. "Two wrongs don't make a right." "The pen is mightier than the sword." "When in Rome, do as the Romans." "The squeaky wheel gets the grease." "No man is an island." "Better late than never." "Birds of a feather flock together." "Keep your friends close and your enemies closer." "A picture is worth a thousand words." "There's no such thing as a free lunch." "The early bird catches the worm." "Never look a gift horse in the mouth." "God helps those who help themselves." "You can't always get what you want." "Cleanliness is next to godliness." "Actions speak louder than words." "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." "Practice makes perfect." The 50 most important English proverbs
  24. 24. "Too many cooks spoil the broth." "Easy come, easy go." "Don't bite the hand that feeds you." "All good things must come to an end." "If you can't beat them, join them." "One man's trash is another man's treasure." "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." "Necessity is the mother of invention." "A penny saved is a penny earned." "You can't judge a book by its cover." "Good things come to those who wait." "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." "Two heads are better than one." "The grass is always greener on the other side of the hill." "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link." "Honesty is the best policy." "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink." "Don't count your chickens before they hatch." The 50 most important English proverbs
  25. 25. Google Free English Lessons and choose those you like the most. Download mobile apps like Duolingo. Download song lyrics and sing them aloud. Watch series and movies in their original version (with or without subtitles. If possible, set subtitles in English.) Change your cell phone language to English. Subscribe to “word a day” services provided by most online dictionaries (Dictionary.com, Merriam- Webster, Wordreference, for example.) Check the pronunciation of new words in online dictionaries. Attend webinars and watch TED talks or YouTube videos in English. Download audiobooks in English and enjoy them during your free time (maybe while jogging). Record yourself and compare your sounds to a native speaker’s. Read online papers and listen to online broadcasting services. (BBC, CNN and The Huff Post)
  26. 26. Vocabulary and Expressions to enhance your performance Auxiliadora González 2015

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