Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

Wheatley and Hervieux "Voice-Assistants, Artificial Intelligence, and the future of Information Literacy"

168 visualizaciones

Publicado el

This presentation was provided by Amanda Wheatley and Sandy Hervieux of McGill University, during the NISO Webinar "Discover and Online Search, Part Two: Personalized Content, Personal Data," which was held on June 19, 2019.

Publicado en: Educación
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Wheatley and Hervieux "Voice-Assistants, Artificial Intelligence, and the future of Information Literacy"

  1. 1. VOICE-ASSISTANTS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AND THE FUTURE OF INFORMATION LITERACY Amanda Wheatley, McGill University Sandy Hervieux, McGill University NISO Discovery and Online Search, Part Two: Personalized Content, Personal Data June 2019
  2. 2. THE RESEARCH TEAM Amanda Wheatley - Liaison Librarian for Management, Business, & Entrepreneurship Sandy Hervieux - Liaison Librarian for Political Science, Philosophy, and the School of Religious Studies
  3. 3. TODAY’S TOPICS Intro to Voice Assistants AI in Libraries The Future of Information Literacy Next Steps
  4. 4. Intro to Voice Assistants
  5. 5. HEY SIRI… WHAT IS A VOICE ASSISTANT? Voice-drivensoftware agent Recordingssentto server Commandis interpreted Computer sends answer toassistant Assistantrelaysdata, playsmedia,or completestasks
  6. 6. MAJOR PLAYERS • Apple’s Siri – 2010 • Microsoft’s Cortana - 2013 • Amazon’s Alexa - 2014 • Google (Assistant) - 2016
  7. 7. WHAT CAN THEY DO According to Hoy (2018), the combined capability of these four voice assistants includes: • Texting, phone calls, email • Basic informational queries • Sets timers, reminders, alarms, and calendar entries • Makes basic math calculations • Controls media playback from connected services (Spotify, Netflix, YouTube, etc.) • Controls Internet-of-Things enabled devices (lights, thermostats, alarms) • Tell jokes and stories
  8. 8. *RECORD SCRATCH* BASIC INFORMATIONAL QUERIES? • Each of these devices is capable of answering questions within their known- item limits. • Pushing the voice assistants to answer more complex questions could result in relevant and accurate answers. • Voice assistants can be updated independently/by third parties to enhance or grow features.
  9. 9. Statista. (2019). Total number of Amazon Alexa skills in selected countries as of January 2019. Retrieved from Statista database.
  10. 10. Statista. (2017). Ownership of smart home devices and smart speakers in the United States from 2015 to 2022 (in million households/unit in use). Retrieved from Statista database.
  11. 11. AI in Libraries
  12. 12. ENVIRONMENT SCAN - METHODOLOGY ● Evaluated the university and university library websites of 25 research-intensive institutions ● Searched for keywords: artificial intelligence, machine learning, deep learning, AI hub ● Library websites: ○ Strategic plans/mission/vision ○ Topic/research/subject guides ○ Programming ○ Partnerships ● University websites: ○ AI hubs ○ Courses ○ Major researchers
  13. 13. ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN - SAMPLE U15 ● University of Alberta ● University of British Columbia ● University of Calgary ● Dalhousie University ● Laval University ● University of Manitoba ● McGill University ● McMaster University ● University of Montreal ● University of Ottawa ● Queens University ● University of Saskatchewan ● University of Toronto ● University of Waterloo ● Western University US Top 10 – Times Higher Education ● California Institute of Technology ● Harvard University ● Johns Hopkins University ● Massachusetts Institute of Technology ● Princeton University ● Stanford University ● University of California Berkeley ● University of Chicago ● University of Pennsylvania ● Yale University
  14. 14. 100% Of university libraries do not mention artificial intelligence in their strategic plans.
  15. 15. ENVIRONMENT SCAN - RESULTS ● All universities have an AI presence (AI hubs or course offerings) ● Only 1 academic library has a subject guide on AI (Calgary) ● Few libraries offer programming and activities related to AI (3) ● 68% of universities have significant researchers in the field ● Although some libraries have digital scholarship hubs, there is no involvement with AI
  16. 16. OF THE 25 ACADEMIC LIBRARIES SAMPLED, ONLY 2 ARE COLLABORATING WITH AI HUBS.
  17. 17. CASE STUDY: WATERLOO Waterloo Artificial Intelligence Institute: Centre for Pattern Analysis and Machine Learning ● Not currently affiliated with any library projects, however, the projects have great potential impact on the research process ● Speech Transcription ○ 1) speech decoder engine to transcribe audio into understandable sequences ○ 2) search and semantic engine to retrieve results ● LORNET (Learning Object Repository Network) ○ Theme 4 - Knowledge Extraction and Learning Object Mining ○ “Addresses problems such as the representation and the extraction of learning object repository contents, be it phrases, semantics, graphics or metadata. It also addresses the organization and clustering techniques to extract common knowledge and classify the elements of a collection of learning objects.”
  18. 18. KEEPING UP WITH THE KARDASHIANS AI in the Library Agent technology to streamline digital searching and suggest articles “Conversational agents” or chatbots using natural language processing Digital libraries and information retrieval RFID tags in circulation AI in Higher Education Digital tutors and online immersive learning environments Programs and majors dedicated to the study across disciplines Student researchers in AI hubs
  19. 19. The Future of Information Literacy
  20. 20. INFORMATION LITERACY CONCEPTS 1. Information has value 2. Information creation as a process 3. Authority as constructed and contextual 4. Research as inquiry 5. Searching as strategic exploration 6. Scholarship as conversation ACRL Framework Information Literacy Threshold Concepts http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework
  21. 21. INFORMATION LITERACY CONCEPTS 1. Information has value 2. Information creation as a process 3. Authority as constructed and contextual 4. Research as inquiry 5. Searching as strategic exploration 6. Scholarship as conversation ACRL Framework Information Literacy Threshold Concepts http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework
  22. 22. RESEARCH AS INQUIRY Researcher Practices ● Formulate questions based on information gaps ● Determine appropriate scope ● Use various research methods ● Organization information in meaningful ways ● Deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones Researcher Dispositions ● Consider research as open-ended exploration ● Seek multiple perspectives during information gathering ● Value intellectual curiosity in developing questions ● Demonstrate intellectual humility
  23. 23. SEARCHING AS STRATEGIC EXPLORATION Researcher Practices ● Identify interested parties who might produce information ● Utilize divergent and convergent thinking ● Match information needs and search strategies ● Understand how information systems are organized ● Use different types of searching language Researcher Dispositions ● Exhibit mental flexibility and creativity ● Understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce results ● Realize that information sources vary greatly ● Seek guidance from experts (such as librarians) ● Recognize the value in browsing and other serendipitous methods
  24. 24. AI, VIRTUAL ASSISTANTS, AND THE EVOLUTION OF HABIT “Many academic skills and rules are never found in research handbooks or statements of learning goals. It is acquired knowledge, working as reflexes rather than conscious actions.” (Lorgren, 2013, p.74) “There is a slowly accumulated competence of cutting corners, skimming and skipping, knowing what emails to answer, what memos to read, judging a book by holding it in one’s hand. Although such routines may be experienced as very personal they are intensely cultural...” (Logren, 2013, p.83)
  25. 25. THE MACHINES ARE COMING FOR US ALL ArxivML ● Integrates with Amazon Alexa ● “reads the 50 most recent machine learning papers from arXiv” ● Alexa starts with the article title, followed by the abstract with an option to skip to the next item
  26. 26. IS AI PREPARED TO ALLOW RESEARCHERS TO CONTINUE THEIR INFORMATION LITERACY PROCESS?
  27. 27. IS AI CAPABLE OF BEING INFORMATION LITERATE?
  28. 28. Next Steps
  29. 29. PHASE 1: THE ENVIRONMENT SCAN PHASE 2: LIBRARIAN PERCEPTIONS PHASE 3: DEVICE TESTING 1 PHASE 4: STUDENT PERCEPTIONS PHASE 5: DEVICE TESTING 2 PHASE 6: AI EXPERIENCE
  30. 30. PHASE 2: LIBRARIAN PERCEPTIONS ● RESEARCH ETHICS BOARD APPROVAL (PENDING) ● DISTRIBUTION OF THE SURVEY ○ US and Canada ○ All types of libraries ● COMPILATION OF THE RESULTS ● PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS AT A CONFERENCE ● PUBLICATION OF THE RESULTS IN AN INFORMATION SCIENCES JOURNAL
  31. 31. PHASE 3: DEVICE TESTING 1 ● SELECTION OF REFERENCE QUESTIONS ● CALIBRATING DEVICES ○ Apple’s Siri ○ Google Home ● EVALUATION MATRIX BASED ON RELEVANCE, ACCURACY, AUTHORITY ● POSTER PRESENTATION AT ALA ANNUAL ● PUBLICATION OF THE RESULTS IN AN INFORMATION SCIENCES JOURNAL
  32. 32. CONCLUDING THOUGHTS • More libraries and librarians need to be aware of the impact of artificial intelligence and begin planning for this next wave of technology. • Conversations about how AI and voice assistants will alter our understanding of information literacy should be taking place now. • New standards that integrate data/digital literacy with information literacy will be crucial in creating a co-existent future.
  33. 33. REFERENCES Allison, D. (2012). Chatbots in the library: is it time? Library Hi Tech, 30(1), 95–107. https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831211213238 Cao, G., Liang, M., & Li, X. (2018). How to make the library smart? The conceptualization of the smart library. Electronic Library, 36(5), 811–825. https://doi.org/10.1108/EL-11-2017-0248 CFLA-FCAB. (2018). CFLA-FCAB national forum paper: Artificial intelligence and intellectual freedom, key policy concerns for Canadian libraries. Retrieved from http://cfla-fcab.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/CFLA-FCAB-2018-National-Forum-Paper-final.pdf Frederick, D. E. (2019). Information seeking in the age of the data deluge. Library Hi Tech News; Bradford, 36(2), 6–10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/LHTN-10-2018-0065 Tay, A. (2017). How libraries might change when AI, Machine learning, open data, block chain & other technologies are the norm. Musings about librarianship. Retrieved April 16, 2019, from http://musingsaboutlibrarianship.blogspot.com/2017/04/how-libraries-might-change-when-ai.html Hoy, M. B. (2018). Alexa, Siri, Cortana, and More: An Introduction to Voice Assistants. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 37(1), 81–88. https://doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2018.1404391 Jacknis, N. (2017, June 21). The AI-Enhanced Library. Retrieved April 16, 2019, from Norman Jacknis website: https://medium.com/@NormanJacknis/the-ai-enhanced-library-a34d96fffdfe Khalifa, A. B. (2017, January 18). arxivML: An Alexa skill to read latest machine learning papers from arXiv. Retrieved April 16, 2019, from Medium website: https://medium.com/@aminert/arxivml-an-alexa-skill-to-read-latest-machine-learning-papers-from-arxiv-5da0562c7b79#.9umudto83
  34. 34. REFERENCES library-policy. (n.d.-b). The Robots are Coming? Libraries and Artificial Intelligence « Library Policy and Advocacy Blog. Retrieved April 16, 2019, from http://blogs.ifla.org/lpa/2018/07/24/the-robots-are-coming-libraries-and-artificial-intelligence/ Löfgren, O. (2014). Routinising research: academic skills in analogue and digital worlds. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 17(1), 73–86. https://doi.org/10.1080/13645579.2014.854022 Plosker, G. (2018). Artificial Intelligence Tools for Information Discovery. Online Searcher, 42(3), 31–35. Statista. (2017). Ownership of smart home devices and smart speakers in the United States from 2015 to 2022 (in million households/unit in use). Retrieved from Statista database. Statista. (2019). Total number of Amazon Alexa skills in selected countries as of January 2019. Retrieved from Statista database. Coleman, C.N. (2017, November). Artificial intelligence and the library of the future, revisited. Retrieved April 16, 2019, from Stanford Libraries website: http://library.stanford.edu/blogs/digital-library-blog/2017/11/artificial-intelligence-and-library-future-revisited
  35. 35. THANK YOU! AMANDA.WHEATLEY@MCGILL.CA SANDY.HERVIEUX@MCGILL.CA

×