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How HR Can Balance Compliance, Vision, and the Employee Experience

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How HR Can Balance Compliance, Vision, and the Employee Experience

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oin Libby Mullen from BizLibrary and Cassie Whitlock from BambooHR as they discuss how HR professionals can balance the demands of legal, leadership, and employee concerns. We’ll cover four key facets where HR’s efforts will be the key factor in producing desirable results, like increased employee engagement, higher productivity, and strong company culture. With this new mindset, HR will finally have the time, know-how, and buy-in to focus on the human side of human resources.

oin Libby Mullen from BizLibrary and Cassie Whitlock from BambooHR as they discuss how HR professionals can balance the demands of legal, leadership, and employee concerns. We’ll cover four key facets where HR’s efforts will be the key factor in producing desirable results, like increased employee engagement, higher productivity, and strong company culture. With this new mindset, HR will finally have the time, know-how, and buy-in to focus on the human side of human resources.

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How HR Can Balance Compliance, Vision, and the Employee Experience

  1. 1. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Cassie Whitlock Director of Human Resources BambooHR Libby Mullen Learning & Development Manager BizLibrary
  2. 2. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Old Thinking vs. New Thinking Three constituencies to balance: ● The Law ● The Leadership ● The Employee
  3. 3. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com
  4. 4. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com
  5. 5. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Old Thinking vs. New Thinking Three constituencies to balance: ● The Law ● The Leadership ● The Employee
  6. 6. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Finding Balance Between Three Roles 1. Compliance facilitator 2. Strategic partner 3. Employee advocate
  7. 7. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Establishing a Culture Built on Mission, Vision and Values. Mission, Vision, and Values: ● Overall guideline for an organization ● A unifying statement of beliefs and responsibilities ● Helps add a human element to the law and management side of things
  8. 8. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com
  9. 9. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com New employees who can take part in a well-structured onboarding program are 69% more likely to stay with a company for up to three years. What is HR’s role? ● To let employees know about the company’s values during onboarding ● Observe and recognize employees who are living out the true mission, vision, and values and assist the ones who are not.
  10. 10. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Four Key Facets ● Building a Modern Learning Culture ● Manager Training ● Compensation & Benefits ● Feedback & Recognition
  11. 11. 1. Building a Modern Learning Culture Growing demand for professional development opportunities “94% of employees today would stay at a company longer if it invested in their development” - LinkedIn
  12. 12. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Building a Modern Learning Culture HR’s Role: ● As an employee advocate ○ Allow employees time to learn on-the- job ● As the strategic partner ○ Align the learning and development program with key business initiatives ● As the compliance facilitator ○ Insure that the proper compliance training is done and used
  13. 13. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com 5 Steps to Creating a Modern Learning Culture 1. Make it a daily habit 2. Reinforce Learning 3. Celebrating failure 4. Measuring learning vs. training 5. Providing Modern Learning Content and Experiences that are familiar
  14. 14. 2. Management Training Key to success of a company, but often overlooked or only delivered through sessions and seminars that don’t get translated to on-the- job situations. “58% of managers said they didn’t receive any management training.” - CareerBuilder
  15. 15. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Tips for Training Managers ● Develop coaching skills ○ Coaching is building one-on-one relationships and managing a process that result in specific improved performance in targeted areas. ● Focusing on soft skills ○ 80% say soft skills are increasingly important to company success ○ 89% of bad hires typically lack soft skills ● Provide feedback regularly
  16. 16. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com HR’s Communication Palette ● Compliance issues need to be black and white
  17. 17. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com
  18. 18. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com
  19. 19. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Compliance Training ● Compliance should be clear-cut ● Rules are there to protect employees and organizations ● Compliance forms the base of a competent organization
  20. 20. 3. Refining Compensation and Benefits Proving your organization can deliver in the long term “77 percent of workers do not believe the rationale for denying them a raise” - PayScale
  21. 21. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Self-fulfillment Needs Psychological Needs Physical Needs Motivational Needs: challenging work, feeling of accomplishment, sense of team Empowerment Needs: top cover, trusted colleagues, ability to effect change, permissive policies Intrinsic Needs: job satisfaction, shared belief in the mission, passion for the work Physical Needs: competitive salary, access, training/knowledge Career Goals: clear path to reach one's full potential
  22. 22. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Stick to Your Comp Model ● Develop a comp model ○ Do your market research ○ Identify lead, match, and lag levels for each position ○ Matching the market rate leaves room for salary growth and incentives ● Hire with a long-term plan ○ Avoid bargaining ○ Measure performance consistently ○ Review compensation levels regularly ○ Discuss with employees on an annual or semi-annual basis
  23. 23. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com 4. Feedback and Recognition ● Employee level ● Organization level
  24. 24. Giving Responsibility to Managers Let managers handle their departments Employees benefit from 1:1’s vs. annual reviews “Having regular conversations without the formality of an annual review contributes to an atmosphere of confidence. Suddenly it’s easier for both employee and manager to discuss concerns and course correction.” - Inc.
  25. 25. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Recognition by Department ● HR’s role - to highlight the highs in an organization = total company communication ● Managers’ role - to publicly and privately recognize individual employees for their contributions ● HR, Leadership, and Manager role - promote the practice of employees recognizing each other publicly (within teams or cross- departmentally)
  26. 26. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com Macro-Level Feedback Helps Get Buy-In ● Strategy starts with the view from 10,000 feet ● Compile performance data from managers ● eNPS survey - identity the trends and outliers ● Support your case with data
  27. 27. bamboohr.com BizLibrary.com The Benefits of Finding Balance ● Key business initiatives ○ Increased employee engagement ○ Lower turnover ○ Higher productivity ○ Higher Profitability
  28. 28. Takeaways ● Compliance Facilitator: build a solid policy foundation ● Strategic Partner: establish your mission, vision and values throughout the organization ● Employee Advocate: help your employees feel their feedback is heard and considered ● Four facets of your organization that can generate higher profits and happier employees when HR finds balance between the roles. ○ Building a modern learning culture ○ Manager Training ○ Compensation & Benefits ○ Feedback & Recognition
  29. 29. ● HR needs to be able to hand over the torch, and let managers give feedback and lead their teams ● Compiling feedback at the organizational level helps HR get buy-in as a strategic partner and lets them make strategy adjustments toward these benefits: ○ Increased employee engagement ○ Lower turnover ○ Higher productivity ○ Higher Profitability Takeaways
  30. 30. QUESTIONS? BizLibrary Receive a demo of the BizLibrary Solution We’ll contact you shortly to set up the demo BambooHR Receive a free job posting on our ATS and full HRIS for one week We’ll contact you shortly to set this up
  31. 31. CREDIT SLIDE **BizLibrary will add this later
  32. 32. Join us for upcoming webinars! **BizLibrary will add this later
  33. 33. Thank you for attending! Cassie Whitlock Director of Human Resources BambooHR Libby Mullen Learning & Development Manager BizLibrary

Notas del editor

  • Katie (Biz) introduce speakers

  • CASSIE

    Today, we’re going to talk about the balancing act that HR puts on in trying to serve everyone’s needs in the organization.
    There are three consitituencies that you have to balance effectively.
    Law
    Leadership
    Employee
    In the past, HR was mainly concerned with the law.
    Personnel departments were created as a reaction to labor laws and since then, compliance has been the first and foremost issue HR faces with its limited time
    As I like to say, the fan is always on. And something is about to hit it.
    It could be a compliance issue uncovered in an audit. It could be an employee complaint or workplace injury or a #metoo moment spreading across social media.
    Whatever it is, it will hit the fan. And when it does, guess where HR is sitting?
  • CASSIE


    Yes. Right in front of the fan.
    And what does the rest of the organization see?
  • CASSIE


    A big cloud descending from the HR office.
    Whether or not HR is originally responsible for the issue, HR will take blame for the fallout.
    So we’ve learned to protect the fan as best we can.
    Discuss methods to protect the fan
    Before technology automated some of these transactions (like payroll and others), entire HR departments could spend all their time guarding the fan.
    But in protecting the fan, HR has gotten its traditional reputation.
    Employees fear the HR office, because they figure they’ve thrown something into the fan
    Leaders get impatient with HR because we’re telling them everything they can’t do.
  • CASSIE


    So how do you change this way of thinking?
    You need the right perspective and strategy for HR’s role.
    HR needs to find sustainable ways to guard the fan, to keep compliance going without having it suck up all their time.
    Supporting this goal is one of BambooHR’s biggest objectives, because you can’t create a great place to work if you’re spending all your time covering minutiae and reacting to emergencies.
    After handling compliance, it can get a seat at the strategic table and really work with leadership
    Understand the goals and values of the organization
    Create strategies to support the leadership’s vision
    It’s only when you’ve taken care of those two layers that you’ll have
    a) the time
    b) the buy-in and authority
    to improve the employee experience in your organization.
  • CASSIE

    We’re not saying that employees come last. Without a good employee experience, the most well-thought-out and fan-protected organization won’t achieve half of what it could.
    But in order to be an effective employee advocate, you need to do the groundwork in becoming an effective compliance facilitator and a trusted strategic partner.
    Today, we’re going to cover the ways that we can do that
    So we’re not just reacting to every employee suggestion, management idea, or fan-blown compliance issue
    Instead, we’re creating a framework and helping everyone in the organization understand and fit into it.

    BizLibrary (Libby)

    One of the best ways that an HR professional can find balance between these three roles and break down the old way of thinking is through a strong company culture.
  • BizLibrary (Libby)

    One of the best ways that an HR professional can find balance between these three roles and break down the old way of thinking is through a strong company culture.

    A strong company culture is built upon the mission, vision and values of an organization.

    The mission, vision and values serve as an overall guideline for the organization. The best employees are the ones that truly live and work the mission, vision and values of a company. The mission, vision and values also act as a unifying statement of beliefs and responsibilities. The statement is known “company wide” and illustrates what is expected of an employee of your organization. This eliminates the responsibility of HR having to constantly remind employees what is expected of them.

    (BIZLIBRARY EXAMPLES OF HOW WE LIVE OUT OUR VALUES EVERYDAY)

  • CASSIE

    BambooHR has seven values that work together to outline the type of workplace we want, both in themselves and how they interact
    Be Open - applies to transparency in compliance, clearly communicated vision, and employee interactions
    Do the right thing: Please join us in protecting this fan. Not just covering it up, but taking care of things correctly.
    And because we do the right thing, we can Assume the best: reduces lots of the friction so we can focus on the mission


    Most importantly, having a culture built upon strong mission, vision and values helps add a human element to the Legal and Management side of things.


    So, let’s look at the roles HR plays in creating an organization that is built upon a strong mission, vision and values.
  • BizLibrary (Libby)

    What is HR’s Role in building a strong mission, vision and values?

    HR’s first responsibility is to let employees know about the company’s values and what is expected of them during onboarding. Onboarding is the first impression an employee has of the company, and it makes a big impact. According to a SHRM report, new employees who can take part in a well-structured onboarding program are 69% more likely to stay with a company for up to three years.

    A strong onboarding program, is the foundation that you need to build a strong company culture throughout your organization.

    HR’s second responsibility is to help recognize those employees who are living out the true mission, vision and values of the company, and those who are not. This is where the “employee advocate” role of HR comes into play. Traditionally, HR would either have to side with an employee or side with an organization on something as minimal as dress code, or something as serious as a termination, and neither side could be 100% with their opinions. Now the new mindset of HR hopes to break this role, and instead of being the one that always has to be an employee's “final destination” before they are terminated/fired, HR should be involved in other “fun events” that help build the company culture.When the rest of the company removes their “stigma” around HR’s role, the fan will begin to slow down. (BIZLIBRARY EXAMPLE - Jennifer leading the “enjoy the journey committee)


    With the mission, vision and values set, HR can start focusing on other facets to help find balance and build a strong culture in their organizations. I’ll let Cassie take it from here to talk about the four major facets where HR’s efforts will be key factors in producing desirable business results like increased employee engagement, higher productivity and a strong company culture.
  • CASSIE


    Building a modern learning culture: Libby is going to cover more of this, but the biggest difference is that this isn’t a policy of Compliance, Policy, Obedience
    At bamboo, we call it growing from good to great.
    We’re also going to cover some essential parts of this process
    Starting with manager training
    Setting up a solid foundation with compensation and benefits
    And exploring how to set up effective feedback in your organization with authentic recognition to help employee satisfaction.
    Basically, these steps are the art of adding heart to your business.
    You’re still going to take care of compliance and encourage employees to follow policies.
    But instead of demanding obedience with the threat of your employees’ basic essentials, your organization can give each employee the perspective they need.
    They don’t all need to be HR pros, but they should understand the essential reasons behind your policies.
    And as things change (as they always will) each employee needs the limits and understanding to adjust to the changes. They need to keep learning.
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    The first facet is building a learning culture within your organization. Different from a training culture, a learning culture invites all employees to learn skills that will help development them on a personal and professional level.

    The demand for professional development opportunities is growing. A study done by LinkedIn, found that 94% of employees today would stay at a company longer if it invested in their development.

    So, what can HR do to help employees receive these professional development opportunities and build a culture of learning?
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    For a company to be able to build a successful learning culture, HR must be represented in all three roles.

    HR should be the employees’ advocate, and be the dominant voice that leadership hears to allow employees time to learn on the job. Employees are already using platforms such as google and youtube to find instant answers to their on-the-job needs. Let’s create a learning culture that allows employees to find the answers they are looking for whenever and wherever they may be.

    As a strategic partner in building a learning culture, HR will need to align the learning and development program with key business initiatives like, increased employee engagement, less turnover more productivity. Bringing stats like this to the table, helps the c-suite look to HR as a partner instead of a rule enforcer.

    And finally having a learning culture, will make everyone’s least favorite activity, compliance training, more enjoyable for everyone. Instead of HR having to hound the employees to do their compliance training, the employees can be assigned the training and easily accomplish it within the learning culture they built. Also, HR has the benefit to keep track of who has completed the training and who has not.

    Building a learning culture with the support of HR allows an organization to continually increase employees’ professional development and insure that all compliance is handled and learned.

    Let’s look at the key steps needed to build a learning culture in your organization.
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    So, we know HR’s role in building a learning culture for your organization. But, HR cannot do it alone.

    There are 5 steps to creating a modern learning culture

    Make it a daily habit​
    Make it Short
    Make it accessible
    Reinforce Learning​
    The forgetting Curve
    Celebrating failure (after-action reviews)​
    Measuring learning vs. training​
    Providing Modern Learning Content and Experiences that are familiar (video/youtube-style training)
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    The second facet is management training.
    Management training is key to the success of a company, but is often overlooked or only delivered through sessions and seminars that don’t get translated to on-the-job situations

    Management training is key, but sadly most managers are not receiving proper, or any, training on how to lead their teams.

    “A recent study by CareerBuilder.com shows that a whopping 58 percent of managers said they didn’t receive any management training. Most managers in the workforce were promoted because they were good at what they did, and not necessarily good at making the people around them better. This statistic obviously unveils a harsh reality. We have a bunch of leaders who aren’t trained on how to lead.”

  • BizLibrary - Libby

    So, how can we properly train managers how to lead?

    Teaching managers how to be a coach
    Coaching is a process. ​ It’s not an event. It’s not just a relationship. It’s not about friendship. It’s not about power or a hierarchy. It’s a process driven relationship with a clear objective, and that goal is to help the subject of the coaching to improved performance.
    Focus on soft skills
    Thanks to AI and computer automation, soft skills like communication, negotiation, leadership, and conflict resolution are now important now than ever before! According to LinkedIn’s 2019 Global Talent Trends, 80% of those polled say soft skills are increasingly popular to a company’s success and 89% of bad hires typically lack soft skills.
    As a manager, technical skills are not enough and that is where most training lacks. They teach the basics of the role, but to be a great manager you have to know how to coach and lead your team.
    Provide feedback regularly
    The best way to creating a coaching style and use soft skills is through feedback. Feedback can be positive or negative, but it must be frequent to have effect. In order to train managers the proper way to manage, feedback must be given often and deliberately.

    Training managers the proper way, creates a trickle down effect. When the manager is striving to do their best, the employees respect that and try to do their best.
  • CASSIE


    One essential thing to train managers on is communication
    Managers are one of the most important parts of the palette HR uses to communicate with the organization.
    I call it the palette because Every experience your employees have plays a part of the big picture.
    Employees will have more direct experiences with managers than with HR
    It’s important that they’re setting the right tone
    Tones: Directive vs Inquisitive
    Difference between negative feedback and constructive criticism (leads into color example on next slide)

    Communication Style (Warmth)
    Directive versus Inquisitive
    Balancing three voices (company, employee and law)
    Compliance, Policy, Obedience
    Engagement
    Solid hygiene foundation first. (you do care, your organization cares, fix the base then build on it to have human interactions.)

  • CASSIE



    For example, an employee could have a certain situation - let’s take manager feedback as an example.
    So here we have two employees who get the same feedback represented by these colored block: “your performance could be better.”
  • CASSIE

    But this simple message can have different meanings based on the context around them.
    If this comes in a regular one on one meeting where the manager has set a context of improvement, then the employee is more likely to see it as a positive opportunity to improve.
    But if the feedback comes in an annual review where the employee feels that their future is on the line, then they’re more likely to see it as a threat or an excuse.
    Context matters. Your employees are deciding every day whether they want to tint their life closer or further away from the shade of your organization.
    Just to be clear: this doesn’t mean I have a rule that employees wear nothing but Bamboo green.
    But you don’t want your organization to overshadow or clash with what your employees value.
  • CASSIE

    That being said, some things are black and white, very clear cut
    Whether or not everyone understands or agrees with laws, they are there for a reason
    Most of the rules are designed to protect
    Protect humans - from unfair business decisions and unsafe working conditions
    Protect employers - from deceit in the workplace, from financial and legal consequences
    Making sure that managers understand these boundaries doesn’t mean that you have to make everything black and white, perfect or pink slip.
    But if your employees are going to color in the lines, they need to know where those lines are.
    #metoo discussion? How do people get to a #metoo culture where people are surprised at the consequences of basically indecent behavior?
    One of the most important messages you can send your employees is that your organization is competent.
    Many organizations focus on employee competencies, and rightly so.
    Employer competency is the other side of that coin
    Employees want stable employment, not a printed-off sign on the door stating that the company was shut down greeting them on Monday morning.
    Compliance is the first layer of that foundation. It’s proving that you won’t be shut down by the government or by the court of public opinion.
  • CASSIE

    The next layer of that foundation is refining compensation and benefits in your organization.
    Your compensation plan sends powerful messages to your employees and gives them context about your organization’s competency and context.
    Both BizLibrary and Bamboo have worked with PayScale in the past, their specialty is market salary research. One of their recent studies found that 77% of the employees who asked for a raise and didn’t get one didn’t believe the explanation the company gave for denying the raise.
    https://www.payscale.com/data/how-to-ask-for-a-raise
    THe biggest rationale given for no raise was “lack of budget”
    It also found that these employees who asked for a raise and didn’t get one were more likely to quit
    But on the other hand, it found that 30 percent of people who didn’t ask for a raise didn’t have to: their organizations already gave them one.
    Proactively developing a plan for compensation and sticking with it throughout the employee life cycle sends a better message than reacting to raise requests as they drift toward the fan.
  • CASSIE

    It comes back down to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    The needs at the base fade into the background of employee’s minds when they’re met.
    An earlier Payscale study found that most people think they’re underpaid
    Those paid above market: 35% think they’re underpaid
    Those paid at market: 64% think they’re underpaid
    When the physical needs aren’t met, they take precedence, and again, the lack is HR’s fault as the face of the organization.
    That’s the reason you have to plan out compensation carefully: if you’re promising that your organization cares for its employees and you
    hire too many or
    stretch the budget to get a “top candidate”
    Then you run the risk of getting into a scenario where an employee can’t get their basic compensation/benefits needs from your organization.
    At this point you can’t be the employee’s advocate without a tradeoff in resources somewhere else in your organization.
    And the employee either leaves voluntarily for something better
    Or faces a layoff scenario, undermining the message of a caring culture for the other employees.
  • CASSIE

    If your organization doesn’t have a universal comp plan, then it’s worth discussing
    Do your market research
    Identify lead, match, and lag levels for each position
    Matching the market rate leaves room for salary growth and incentives
    Hire with a long-term plan
    Avoid bargaining
    Measure performance consistently
    Review compensation levels regularly
    Discuss with employees on an annual or semi-annual basis
  • CASSIE

    By now you may see a pattern: every element we’ve discussed so far has involved HR working with their organization to identify a strategy in advance and make a proactive plan that works best for both the needs of the organization and the needs of the employees.
    But the best plans have one thing in common: they can evolve when it’s clearly necessary.
    So the fourth facet of a successful transition to modern HR is Feedback and Recognition, both on the micro and macro level.
    Optimizing feedback at both levels is the key to getting buy-in from employees and buy in from your leadership
    Everyone should feel that their suggestions have been heard and considered
    This doesn’t mean that you have to implement every suggestion right away.
    You shouldn’t do this alone, you need to include your management team….
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    Sometimes, it is best when HR steps away from providing feedback and reviews. A perfect example of this is the benefits an employee can receive from having 1:1 with their managers instead of having an annual review.

    Inc. has a great quote of the benefits of more frequent communication created by 1:1’s.

    "Having regular conversations without the formality of an annual review contributes to an atmosphere of confidence. Suddenly it's easier for both employee and manager to discuss concerns and do course correction." - Inc.


    As managers take on the responsibility of providing direct feedback to their departments, the HR professional keeps the overall morale high.




  • BizLibrary - Libby

    Recognition is something that everyone likes to receive, but what is HR’s true role in giving recognition?

    We broke down recognition by departments:

    HR’s role is to highlight the highs in an organization, give total company communication.

    And then let the Managers’ role to be publicly and privately recognize individual employees for their contributions

    Finally, HR, Leadership, and Manager role will be to promote the practice of employees recognizing each other publicly (within teams or cross-departmentally)
  • CASSIE

    HR is great at facilitating manager to help with employees.
    But there’s one spot where HR is in a unique position: it can see and interact with each team in the organization
    I call this the view from 10,000 feet
    Compiling performance feedback from managers
    eNPS data - get the unvarnished truth straight from the employees
    Identify the trends and outliers
    This data supports your position when making your case to leadership
  • BizLibrary - Libby

    The benefits of balancing the three roles of HR, employee advocate, strategic partner and compliance facilitator within the four facets of building a learning culture, manager training, compensation and benefits and feedback and recognition will not only help HR be more successful in their role, but will increase key business initiatives like employee engagement, retention, productivity and profitability by creating a strong company culture.

    Cassie will finish up with some key takeaways.
  • CASSIE
  • CASSIE
  • Katie (Biz)
  • Katie (Biz)
  • Katie (Biz)
  • Katie (Biz) So we want to give a big thank you to Libby and Cassie for presenting with us today and thanks everyone for attending! Have a great day!​

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