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Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent

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Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent

  1. 1. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  2. 2. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Todd Grierson Head of Industry Insights BambooHR Jan Choi Senior Recruiter Jobvite
  3. 3. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Employees’Wandering Eye
  4. 4. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 64% ofemployeesaresatisfiedatwork (64%)—but82%ofthemareopento newjobopportunities. Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study
  5. 5. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 50% ofemployeeshadatleastoneinterview inthelastyeartoexploreoptionsorget experience—withnointentionof leavingtheircurrentjobs. Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study
  6. 6. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent The “hyper-hopper” trend: Half of the workforce is expected to change jobs at least every 5 years. Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study
  7. 7. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Hiring Great Talent
  8. 8. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent • Determine the difference between an average employee and an exemplary employee. • Identify your ”regrettable” and ”non-regrettables.” • The talent you need depends on your business needs. • Within every step of the recruiting process, make sure you’re evaluating employees against your needs assessment and company values. Defining Great Talent
  9. 9. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 59% ofjobseekersresearchcompanies’ website,socialmedia,andreviewsto gaininsightontheiremployerbrand andculture. Jobvite, 2016 Job Seeker Nation Study
  10. 10. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  11. 11. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent • Take the initiative to build a brand. Recruiters and HR can build this, not just execs, marketing, etc. • It requires a lot of active management. • Branding is everything. It’s where the advertising and showmanship hits the pavement. • Be honest. Do a gut check with your brand and what you’re telling candidates on your career site and in the interview. Branding Takeaways
  12. 12. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent ClicktoApplyRate Job Titles
  13. 13. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent ClicktoApplyRate Job Descriptions
  14. 14. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent • Only provide information that will educate applicants without overwhelming them. • Talk to your sourcers. If there’s a new job title on the rise or a variation, they’ll know it. • Be consistent. Reflect your employment brand in your descriptions and even into your follow up emails. Job Description Takeaways
  15. 15. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 47% ofjobseekerssayinterviewshavethe biggestimpactintheirimpressionofa job. Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study
  16. 16. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 53% ofcandidatessaidtheinterviewwiththe hiringmanagerhadthebiggestimpact ontheirinterviewexperience. LinkedIn, Talent Trends 2015
  17. 17. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent • Sit down with your hiring managers to set realistic hiring timelines and interview expectations. • Pre-assigned interview topics for each interviewer. • Collect hiring team feedback immediately. • Follow up with a candidate within 24 hours of the interview. • Beat the Glassdoor Reviews. Ask your candidates for feedback immediately after the interview. Interviewing Takeaways
  18. 18. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 72% ofrecruitersareinvolved inintegrating newhiresintothecompany Jobvite, 2016 Recruiter Nation Study
  19. 19. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent • 72% of recruiters are involved in integrating new hires into the company. (Jobvite, 2016 Recruiter Nation Study) • Recruiters need to sit down with HR and address the grey area where recruiting ends and HR begins. • Set up a 30, 60 and 90 day plan to get new hires up and running. • Educate and introduce them to the right points of contact. Onboarding Takeaways
  20. 20. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Retaining Great Talent
  21. 21. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Thecostofreplacinganemployee isbetween16to213%of theirannualsalary,dependingontheirspecialtyand experience. —TheSocietyforHumanResourceManagement(SHRM)Research “ ”
  22. 22. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Costs of Disengagement • Unengaged employees leaving your organization • Actively disengaged employees work against your organization • Gallup finds that disengaged employees are more likely to steal, negatively influence coworkers, miss work, and complain to customers • Gallup estimates that actively disengaged employees cost the U.S. $483 billion to $605 billion each year in lost productivity.
  23. 23. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Minimize Regrettable Turnover Only
  24. 24. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Workplace Deal Breakers Revealed
  25. 25. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  26. 26. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  27. 27. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  28. 28. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent How to Avoid These Pitfalls
  29. 29. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  30. 30. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  31. 31. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  32. 32. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Recruitingpostsandpagesareoftenaspirational—tothe extentofbeingdishonest—whichdoesyouadisservice inthe longrunbecauseyougetpeoplewhoarethendisappointed whentherealitydoesn’tmatchtheadvertisement. —JoelGrossman,COO,LocationLabs “ ”
  33. 33. Quirk: Noun (plural quirks), an idiosyncrasy; a slight glitch, mannerism;something unusual about the manner or style of something or someone Your Company Your Name 1.0 QUIRKS BLUEPRINT BLUEPRINT TO [NAME] AND [HIS/HER] QUIRKS EXAMPLE QUIRK Add a description of your quirk! 1 2 3 4 5 6 87
  34. 34. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  35. 35. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  36. 36. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  37. 37. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Group 1 1. Personal Motivation 0/12 Washed Hands
  38. 38. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Group 2 1. Personal Motivation 2. Change the Environment 0/12 Washed Hands
  39. 39. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Group 3 1. Personal Motivation 2. Change the Environment 3. Deliberate Practice 3/12 Washed Hands
  40. 40. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Group 4 1. Personal Motivation 2. Change the Environment 3. Deliberate Practice 4. Peer Pressure 11/12 Washed Hands… Why?!
  41. 41. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  42. 42. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  43. 43. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  44. 44. bamboohr.com 1-866-387-9595 Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  45. 45. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent
  46. 46. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent 5 Tips to Keep Your Best People 1. Build a strong culture 2. Get people in the right seat on the bus 3. Set clear (and not inflated) expectations 4. Influence leaders’ worldview on talent 5. Listen to your new hires
  47. 47. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent Follow BambooHR and Jobvite on social media: bamboohr.com/blog | jobvite.com Thank you!
  48. 48. bamboohr.com jobvite.com Staying Power: How to Hire and Retain Great Talent BambooHR See a live demo of Jobvite and receive a free “Eat Sleep Recruit” t-shirt! Jobvite Reach out to recruit@jobvite-inc.com for more details. Questions? Receive our full HRIS for one week. We will contact everyone within a few days to set this up.

Notas del editor

  • Intros
  • JAN:
  • JAN:

    More than half of employees are satisfied at work (64%)—but 82% of them are open to new job opportunities. (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
    In contrast, in 2016, 74% were satisfied and 74% were open.
  • JAN:

    50% of employees had at least one interview in the last year to explore options or get experience—with no intention of leaving their current jobs. (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
    We’ve entered the age of job sampling.
  • JAN:

    The “hyper-hopper” trend—half of the workforce are expected to change jobs at least every 5 years. (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
    Welcome to the Age of the “Hyper-Hopper”
    Job hopping is accelerating, with almost half of job seekers changing jobs at least every 5 years.
    Hyper-hoppers are job seekers who change jobs every 1-3 years. This doesn’t just include millennials.


    Everything about staffing an organization with the right people comes down to developing effective relationships, with your candidates, recruiting managers, employees and more. The more you invest in these relationships, the longer you’ll employees will stay. Today, we’re going to teach you how you can counter thishyper-hopper trend with your best employees.
  • JAN:
  • JAN:

    Determine the difference between an average employee and exemplary employee
    Some cultures value long tenure, while other industries and regions see quick turnaround and value other qualities.
    Insert our example in Silicon Valley. What do we value here?
    Identify your ”regrettable” and ”non-regretables”
    Meaning which employees you can’t afford to lose
    It will help you determine which employees you’d be most sad to have leave your organization and why
    The talent you need depends on your business needs
    Within every step of the interview process, make sure you’re evaluating employees against your needs assessment and company values
  • JAN:

    59% of job seekers research companies’ website, social media, and reviews to gain insight on their employer brand and culture.   (Jobvite, 2016 Job Seeker Nation Study)

    Also note:
    25% of job seekers search Facebook (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
    23% of job seekers search LinkedIn (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
    Younger workers are more than twice as likely to research companies via Instagram (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)

    What this really means is the recruiters and HR have to step up and take control of their employer voice on social media, because job seekers are doing their research.
  • JAN:

    Link: http://www.pactiv.com/Pactiv/Search-Jobs/Our-People.htm
    In the example here, our customer, Pactiv, is so transparent that the actually interview employees and ask for their feedback working at Pactiv and being recruited by Pactiv.
  • JAN:

    Take the initiative to build a brand. Recruiters and HR can build this, not just execs, marketing, etc.
    Insert example of how Jobvite has done this.
    It requires a lot of active management.
    Branding is everything. It’s where the advertising and showmanship hits the pavement. Your brand has to be authentic to hire and retain talent.
    Be honest. Do a gut check with your brand and what you’re telling candidates on your career site and even in the interview.

    Invest in your career website and social media presence by asking yourself these questions:
    Is your career site a victim of neglect?
    Does your overall employment deliver a message, appear credible, connect on an emotional level, or motivate the prospect, and create loyalty?
    Is it mobile optimized?
  • JAN:

    Besides shortening the application form itself, pay attention to the job description and title.
    Job titles with 51 to 60 characters have more applications.
  • JAN:

    Job descriptions with 501 to 1,000 characters have more applications.
    At this length, job seekers get enough information without becoming bored.
  • JAN:

    Keep it simple. Only focus on the information that will educate candidates without overwhelming them. After all, we saw how important it is to keep in mind job description and even title length when advertising new jobs.
    Talk to your sourcers. If there’s a new job title on the rise or a variation, they’ll know it.
    Be consistent. Reflect your employment brand in your descriptions and even into your follow up emails.

    Additional talking points:
    Job descriptions are ads after all. You’re selling the job and company in less than a few paragraphs.
    Be realistic when it comes to requirements and experience. Too many can be too intimidating.
    Research job titles on LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and other job boards to make sure they’re consistent with job seekers search terms.
  • JAN:

    Interviewing candidates is just important for your hiring team as it is for the candidate.
    Most job seekers (47%) say interviews have the biggest impact in their impression of a job. (Jobvite, 2017 Job Seeker Nation Study)
  • JAN:

    53% of candidates said the interview with the hiring manager had the biggest impact on their interview experience. (LinkedIn, Talent Trends 2015)
    Given these statistics, what can you do to improve the candidates experience and hiring team experience so everyone is happy?
  • JAN:

    Pre-assigned interview topics for each interviewer, so that everyone covers a different topic and area of interest.
    Also: Do the interviewers know how to properly sell the role?
    Make realistic hiring timelines and interview expectations with your hiring managers.
    How many people have structured kick-off meetings with their HM to write down what needs and wants they have for a hire?
    Pre-assigned interview topics for each interviewer.
    Insert example (maybe an example of how we’ve been recruiting/hiring LDRs so rapidly?)
    Collect hiring team feedback immediately.
    General Rule of Thumb: Follow up with a candidate within 24 hours of the interview.
    It’s also Jobvite internal policy to follow up with candidates no later than 24 hours after the in-person or phone interview.
    Beat the Glassdoor Reviews: Ask your candidates for feedback immediately after the interview.
  • JAN:

    72% of recruiters are involved in integrating new hires into the company (Jobvite, 2016 Recruiter Nation Study
  • JAN:

    Recruiters need to sit down with HR and address the grey area where recruiting ends and HR begins.
    Where it starts for one organization might be different than yours.
    Set up a 30, 60 and 90 day plan to get new hires up and running.
    Onboarding isn’t just about the first day on the job. It’s about the weeks leading up to it, and the months after it.
    Insert an example here of the difference between a 30 day, 60 day and 90 day plan.
    Educate and introduce them to the right points of contact.
    For example, we like to set up new employees with new hire buddies. These buddies take them out to lunch, have frequent check-ins, and act as resource for all the small questions new hires might have.
  • TODD:

    Using Jan's tips, you are in a great position to be able to find the best candidates for your open jobs.

    The second half of this webinar will share the conditions that will lead to your best employees leaving. 100% of the time. Thank goodness you’re on this webinar because we will show you 5 tips to make sure that never happens at your organization and that you keep your best people. Before we share the goods, we need some context on setting the right retention objectives for your organization so we can make sure we’re heading in the right direction.

    So Where Should We Aim? What Standard Ought We Aspire to? How would you define success?
  • SHRM estimates that the cost of replacing an employee ranges from expensive to even more expensive, depending on their specialty and experience. Part of how you might define success is by saving the costs of turnover. Because what business could possibly afford to pay these costs and stay in business for any reasonable amount of time.
  • Or maybe you see an even more nefarious cost hidden. The cost of having the wrong people stay around.

    Saving costs related to reduced engagement from other employees. The bad apples are the employees who steal from you, who negatively influence their coworkers, who fake sick and miss work days, and who complain to your customers and drive them away. Gallup estimates that actively disengaged employees cost the U.S. $483 billion to $605 billion each year in lost productivity.
     
    So we might want to try to steer clear of setting objectives around minimizing raw turnover and just choose a different direction.
  • To properly honor the joy of having a bad apple removed from our organization, you may decide to set an objective around regrettable turnover. That is to say, the % of employees that left your organization in the last year, that were happy and productive and you wish they were still here.

    If we optimize for regrettable turnover, activities that lead the bad apples to the pasture can be viewed correctly as helpful. Obviously we never our hiring managers to make a mishire, but fixing that type of mistake is something we want your organization to do when setting objectives around retaining your employees.

    When a cultural misfit comes to their own conclusion that they would be more successful elsewhere and voluntarily leave (before we have to ask them to), we feel our managers are being especially effective at clearly articulating our values, our expectations, in a way that the employee can say that’s just not for me while maintaining respect for the organization and dignity for themselves.

    So if we want to keep only the good ones around, what areas do we need to be mindful of? What causes good employees to quit?
  • Recently, BambooHR polled more than 1,000 U.S.-based employees to ask why they left previous jobs and rate how annoying various aspects of work are on a scale from “acceptable” to “deal breaker” (1 = acceptable; 2 = somewhat acceptable; 3 = annoying, but tolerable; 4 = considerably annoying; 5 = deal breaker that would make you want to leave). The results show that among the common reasons employees decide to move on, being valued and respected and maintaining a healthy work-life balance are what matter most.

    We wanted to know what aspects of work are most likely to get on employees' nerves? More importantly, at what point does it go beyond annoying and into "deal-breaker" territory? If your gut reaction is “it's all about compensation,” but this research suggests that instinct is wrong and that employees value certain intangibles much more.

    In truth, issues related to advancement and work-life balance elicit the highest emotional response from U.S. employees.

    This survey reveals "Tiers of Tolerance" and illustrates that as long as employees’ pressing needs are met, they’re willing to deal with what they consider to be lesser annoyances.
  • The No. 1 reason respondents left their previous job is lack of opportunities for advancement (22 percent).
  • Along with the study we got an assessment of how acceptable certain workplace annoyances are.

    Your boss doesn’t trust/empower you (1 in 4).
    You are expected to work/answer emails on sick days, on vacations and/or after work hours (1 in 4).
    You don’t get along with your co-workers (1 in 6).
    Management "passes the buck" when things don’t go as planned (1 in 5).
    Work is not flexible with regard to your family responsibilities (1 in 5).
  • Not surprisingly, we saw variation in a few of the categories based on gender and age. Here are some of the key takeaways:

    “emails on sick days, on vacations and/or after works hours” is polarizing, as it is also seen as one of the most acceptable issues (14 percent of respondents marked it as “acceptable”).
    Men find it more acceptable (1 in 5 men vs. 1 in 10 women), and women see it as more of a deal breaker (1 in 3 women vs. 1 in 5 men).
    Women are more likely to consider “work is not flexible with regard to your family responsibilities” to be an employment deal breaker than men (1 in 4 women vs. 1 in 8 men).

    Complaints related to compensation are highest in the 18–29 age range and steadily decline as employees get older.

    A lack of fringe benefits progressively becomes more of a deal breaker as employees age.

    A positive social atmosphere is important – employees want to get along with their co-workers, but they aren’t looking to be best friends or hang out together on the weekends.

    While not getting along with your co-workers is one of the leading deal breakers, “Your coworkers don’t interact outside of work” is the most acceptable irritation on the list (more than half of respondents marked it as “acceptable”).

    The age range of 30-44 is disproportionately more annoyed by lack of flexibility when it comes to family responsibilities compared to any other age demographic. These people clearly crave flexibility from an employer.
    3 in 4 of those in the 30-44 age range marked “work is not flexible with regard to your family responsibilities” as “considerably annoying” or a deal breaker.

    Manager-level employees accept less flexibility with regard to family responsibilities.
  • Of course there are quite a few ways that the intangibles influence an employees happiness.

    How do we address the issues before they become a deal breaker? How do we make sure our organizations don’t run into these issues and make a top performer want to quit. Put away your pocketbooks, the strategies we’ll discuss are going to focus outside the areas of comp since we saw how important the intangibles relative to compensation.
  • Your first tip is to have a strong and deliberate culture. The research is out on this. Companies with strong cultures win relative to their peers everytime.

    I wanted to showcase a few examples from BambooHR’s internal culture that help influence great work being done.

    We’ve put our values into seven phrases that guide the way Bambooligans get work done

    Be Open. It speaks to our desire to share good ideas and they can come from anywhere. If you have something to say, we expect you to speak up! It's why you're here.

    Lead from Where You Are. This one gives everyone permission to see a need and fill a need even if it doesn’t fit their job description. You don't need a fancy title to make an impact and certainly no one is holding you back from contributing more so you can feel free to lean in at any point. Permission granted! We need you to be a leader if we’re going to succeed.

    Do the Right Thing. We do the right thing because it's the right thing to do, which speaks to our integrity.

    Grow from Good to Great speaks to our innate desire to always improve. We set records monthly but that new record just becomes the next standards within a couple weeks.

    Enjoy Quality of Life. We expect employees to be as successful in their personal life as they are in their professional life. We know that when people succeed in other areas it will reflect in their work.

    Assume the Best. We know no one wakes up in the morning trying to sabotage our company. Since we are open with our team, it makes it easier for us to always assume that people are here working with us towards the same goal.

    Make it Count. Since we do enjoy quality life and since working 60 or 70 hours a week is not something that's allowed at BambooHR, we have to bring intensity to the time we are at work in order to do more in less time.

    These are our 7 core values and you better believe they are making sure we are attracting

    Someone once told me that you know you have a strong culture when you are willing to hire and fire based on it. What happens when your organization’s top sales person is off the reservation, how do you respond? Do you say she’s our top revenue earner so everyone’s going to have to tiptoe around her. Or do you say the way she gets work done is more important to us long-term than the results she achieves? If the latter and you fire that problem causer, then you have a strong culture.

    I wanted to ask the crowd. We have a talented group of HR professionals and recruiters in the audience. What values are you sharing with your candidates? Type them in the box.

    (Discuss other values that pop up)

    Your values influence how your organization acts and reacts, the success of the people you hire, and how you grow into your future. Articulating them clearly to your employees and enforcing them is foundational in keeping your best people. They have to be authentic in order to get anyone to buy into them. People can smell fake from a mile away.

    I heard about one CEO who called a company meeting to introduce the new company values. He said: “I hope you appreciate these values. It cost us $10,000 for our PR firm to come up with them.”

    Now I don’t know what was in that presentation. But the unspoken message came through loud and clear: we’re a company that values money most and other considerations only matter in how they affect the bottom line.

    And for some organizations, prioritizing a money making engine is part of their core values, and they attract employees with the same expectations. But for the employees concerned with other aspect of their job life such as career planning, well, this was a signal to jump ship leading to an annualized turnover rate just north of 40%. Ouch!

    Values matter, because they define how your employees and your organization interact with each other. You can only fake them for so long. Being honest about your organization's way of doing things is the first key to stability.

    This next stage also deals with understanding your company’s DNA and some of you may have already completed it. But if you haven’t, this is step #2 on your strategic HR roadmap.

  • Tip #2. Get people in the right seat.

    Proactively look for opportunities to align skills with organizational needs.

    We recently had a customer service rep who was excellent with people. They were smart, engaged, articulate, but one of the aspects of the customer service job is that many of them work from home. We didn’t want to lose this person, but it was clear
  • Set accurate expectations.
  • TODD:

    “Recruiting posts and pages are often aspirational — to the extent of being dishonest — which does you a disservice in the long run because you get people who are then disappointed when the reality doesn’t match the advertisement.”
    Joel Grossman, COO, Location Labs
     
    Location Labs, by the way, boasts a 95% retention rate and has never laid off an employee, even through rough spots on their journey to profitability. They attribute this success to very careful recruiting, including an About You section that directly lays out the kind of person that will succeed at Location Labs. Because they’ve laid out clear expectations, their employees have such a great experience that over 40% of their new hires coming from referrals, both from current and former employees.

    That sounds like a pretty great story. But not all retention is created equal. If you wanted to join the company with the highest retention rate, then you’re looking at Eastman Kodak. More than half their employees have been there for more than 20 years! But this statistic is likely due to their bankruptcy and subsequent restructuring a few years back where they laid off 27,000 employees, leaving a core crew of veterans as a majority of their workforce.

  • We stumble our way towards discovering what our bosses value through trial and error which can be slow and painful. How inefficient!
     
    Typically it takes months and years sometimes to learn all of our bosses quirks. What they like, what annoys them and ( most importantly ) how they uniquely define a rockstar top performer.
     
    We all have our quirks. I know I do.

    One of my quirks – I want people to tell me when I say something stupid. Man, I say stuff I don’t mean all the time. It comes off coarser,


    Be real. If you’re worried about losing the hire if you tell the truth, consider the reality of what will happen if you embellish. I’m not saying to not sell the benefits. Do!
  • Tip #4 Influence Your Leaders Beneath the Surface Worldview on Talent

    I love the visual of this glacier because it shows that what we can see above the surface is an extension of a much larger glacier underneath.

    How we behave reflects below the surface assumptions. Whenever we’ve seen a toxic people leader, we know that there is some faulty worldview buried.

    Our worldview lays the foundation for forming conclusions, and over time, our repeated conclusions shape our beliefs. And it’s around this level that we start to become conscious of what we’re thinking, and where we decide how to act.

    Years ago, I worked with a senior executive that wouldn’t pay people market rate. When it came time for performance or even market adjustments to compensation, this fella wouldn’t budge. We couldn’t understand it.

    Worldview: Every employee is replaceable. Had to be shown over years of a time.

    Behavior is really just the tip of the iceberg, so dig deeper. After you pinpoint the challenge

      
     
    Our worldview lays the foundation for forming conclusions, and over time, our repeated conclusions shape our beliefs. And it’s around this level that we start to become conscious of what we’re thinking, and where we decide how to act.
  • VitalSmarts set out to find what does it take to get people to change? Not easy stuff. But behavior. Especially when it’s hard.
    For example more than 100,000 people die from hospital acquired infections. People get sick at the hospital! The biggest antidote is simply handwashing. Getting people to wash their hands would save lives every year. So they set out on an experiment to find out what it would take to get one of the hardest group’s of people to wash their hands their hands - kids.
    Then someone brought in a delicious distraction - a bunch of cupcakes and said that when they’re done with the puzzle they could eat the cupcakes.
  • So what would it take to get the kids to wash their hands? Before eating the dang cupcakes.
  • Sniffles
  • Simple behavior that saves lives, entirely turned around by 4 sources of influence. I want to illustrate these same concepts with another example even closer to home.
  • This might look like spaghetti but hang tight before you begin to feel hungry.

    Imagine it's your job to eradicate the world's largest parasite. This was Donald Hopkins’s job as Vice President of Health Programs at the Carter Center. The guinea worm is a 3 foot long worms that people get by ingesting microscopic forms of the worms in open sources of contaminated water. A year later the worms about the width of a spaghetti strand will dig their way out of the body at the nearest point, often times eating through important tissue, organs, and definitely skin along the way. This process might kill you. The Genuea worm has the ability to debilitate 20-60% of a village for months and was absolutely devastating.

    Now, let's use the six sources to analyze how we can help villagers follow those 3 rules:

    1-PERSONAL MOTIVATION
    when the worm is exiting a person's body, the pain can be terrible. The only way to receive relief is to soak your painful sores in water....which is exactly what people are taught not to do (stay away from the water!). "If you don't deal with personal motivation, your influence plan will fail". 

    2- PERSONAL ABILITY
    You can't just motivate people to avoid the worm, you have to effectively teach them ways to avoid catching the virus at all costs. "They need training to enhance their personal ability". 

    3- SOCIAL MOTIVATION
    Teaching the locals to eliminate the disease is difficult because villagers don't trust outsiders. If the advice is to mean something, it needs to come from one of them. 

    4- SOCIAL ABILITY
    The phrase "it takes a village" applies here. Villagers have to work together as a team to remove the disease. If someone is infected, others will need to step in and help them filter their water. 

    5- STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION
    Most of the villagers work in the fields near the water source to feed their families. Even when they have the virus, many will continue working in and around the water source, in order to provide for their families. "If you don't deal with the incentive problem, victims will be compelled to serve their families at the expense of the village"

    6- STRUCTURAL ABILITY
    Villagers don't have all of the tools & resources they need to filter the water or care for wounds in a way that keeps them far away from the water source. It's also far too easy for anyone to walk up and place their sore directly into the water source...so structural changes must be made. 
  • The only weapon Dr. Hopkins has in the battle against The Guinea worm is his ability to influence others to change how they behave. No vaccine, no treatment, you're not going to be able to get these people to change their behavior.


    It only takes 3 behaviors for the worm to essentially be eradicated:
    1- filter their water
    2- Infected individuals must not make contact with the public water supply until the infection has run its course
    3- if a neighbor is not filtering water or becomes infected, the villagers must confront him/her

    Now, let's use the six sources to analyze how Dr. Hopkins could help villagers follow those 3 rules:
  • 1-PERSONAL MOTIVATION
    when the worm is exiting a person's body, the pain can be terrible. The only way to receive relief is to soak your painful sores in water....which is exactly what people are taught not to do (stay away from the water!). "If you don't deal with personal motivation, your influence plan will fail". 

    2- PERSONAL ABILITY
    You can't just motivate people to avoid the worm, you have to effectively teach them ways to avoid catching the virus at all costs. "They need training to enhance their personal ability". 

    3- SOCIAL MOTIVATION
    Teaching the locals to eliminate the disease is difficult because villagers don't trust outsiders. If the advice is to mean something, it needs to come from one of them. 

    4- SOCIAL ABILITY
    The phrase "it takes a village" applies here. Villagers have to work together as a team to remove the disease. If someone is infected, others will need to step in and help them filter their water. 

    5- STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION
    Most of the villagers work in the fields near the water source to feed their families. Even when they have the virus, many will continue working in and around the water source, in order to provide for their families. "If you don't deal with the incentive problem, victims will be compelled to serve their families at the expense of the village"

    6- STRUCTURAL ABILITY
    Villagers don't have all of the tools & resources they need to filter the water or care for wounds in a way that keeps them far away from the water source. It's also far too easy for anyone to walk up and place their sore directly into the water source...so structural changes must be made. 


    Results - 3.5 mn infected in 1986. 3 recorded cases in the first quarter of this year
  • So no matter how big the gap, our ability to effect behavior change is a factor of the degree to which we leverage the 6 sources of influence.

    4 or more sources of influence, ideally all 6.
  • Tip #5 Beware of the Orange Extension Cord

    One of my favorite stories teaches us to listen to new hires, who have something valuable only they can offer your organization.

    A friend of mine tells a story of his first day on the job at a new company. As he approached the receptionist’s desk, he saw a bright orange extension cord running from behind the desk and extending down the hall. When he asked about it, she responded: “What extension cord?” He pointed it out, and she shrugged. ”Oh, that’s always been there.”
     
    After his successful interview, my friend brought it up with the CEO and they asked the same question: “Extension cord?” So he walked over and pointed it out, they explained that one of their coworkers had overloaded her circuit with a mini fridge a few months ago, so she ran the extension cord down the hallway and plugged it in behind the receptionist’s desk.
     
    During his first couple of days at the company, my friend thought “we should really fix that extension cord” every time he walked by. It was ugly, and it was affecting visitors’ perception of the company. But by the time six weeks had gone by, he was caught up in meeting his sales goals, and he too had stopped seeing the cord. It had become a part of his regular working life.
     
    As you review your company culture, it’s important to look for your orange extension cords, the factors of working at your organization that you’ve forgotten about but that really stand out to your new hires. While an orange extension cord might not be a deal breaker for most people, leaving the real deal breakers out for people to see can undo the work you put into recruiting.

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