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"Moving Students from Novice to Intermediate High"

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Dr. Doina Kovalik
Dr. Doina Kovalik
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"Moving Students from Novice to Intermediate High"

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A presentation I gave with three colleagues from Upper Arlington High School about how help students progress from novice to intermediate high language proficiency. Specific model tasks were provided for authentic, engaging speaking (interpersonal/presentational mode) and reading (interpretive mode) activities to use with students as well as how they align to the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standards. Links to technology resources to facilitate all modes of communication provided on last two slides.

A presentation I gave with three colleagues from Upper Arlington High School about how help students progress from novice to intermediate high language proficiency. Specific model tasks were provided for authentic, engaging speaking (interpersonal/presentational mode) and reading (interpretive mode) activities to use with students as well as how they align to the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standards. Links to technology resources to facilitate all modes of communication provided on last two slides.

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"Moving Students from Novice to Intermediate High"

  1. 1. Moving Students from Novice to Intermediate High OFLA 2014
  2. 2. Who is here today? Find 3 different teachers who teach 3 different languages. You may not use the following words: • language • teach/teacher • any specific language (“Spanish”, “French”, “German”, etc.) • any country name (Germany, Spain, France, China, etc.) Sit down when you are done!
  3. 3. Debrief ● How were you able to communicate with each other despite your limitations? ● How could you imagine applying this in your classroom? ○ Taboo/Circumlocution
  4. 4. Who we are Tricia Fellinger - German Teacher Richard Duarte - Spanish & French Teacher Becky Searls - Spanish Teacher Kristy Picker - Spanish Teacher
  5. 5. During this workshop we will share... ● our experiences in promoting students’ language development within a proficiency* model. ● ideas for daily learning activities that promote communication and students’ self confidence across levels. ● examples for how to scaffold learning activities in a way that helps students advance in their proficiency. Today, our examples are focused around speaking (presentational/interpersonal) and reading (interpretive).
  6. 6. During this workshop you will… ● place yourself in the role of the learner. ● reflect on and share your own best practices. ● look at what you do in your classroom through a different lens.
  7. 7. UA’s Global Language Program ● Language Sequence: Novice to Intermediate High ● Modes of communication ● Assigning of credit ● Intervention ● Assessment ● Role of grammar ● Articulation: Horizontal & Vertical
  8. 8. How to help students develop their speaking abilities. Let’s get them talking!
  9. 9. With your language partner talk about this picture, using the caption as a starting point. We will give you each one minute to talk. Familienwerte Los valores familiares Les valeurs familiales Family values
  10. 10. Able to handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. Can initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, but errors are evident. Limited vocabulary still necessitates hesitation and may bring about slightly unexpected circumlocution. There is emerging evidence of connected discourse, particularly for simple narration and/or description. The Intermediate-High speaker can generally be understood even by interlocutors not accustomed to dealing with speakers at this level, but repetition may still be required. Intermediate-High ACTFL Descriptor: Speaking
  11. 11. Task: Describe the family in the picture Support: I see … There is/are…. in the family. ________ is _______ years old. ________ lives/ is from _____________. Novice
  12. 12. Task: With a partner describe what the items are and where the items in the picture are located. Beginning Intermediate
  13. 13. Task: Making connections and assumptions I imagine that…because... I assume that…because… It looks…. Therefore, I think…. Intermediate Mid
  14. 14. Task: Take a picture of your 10 favorite or most important items outside of your home (or in your favorite room) and give a presentation. Describe the items and their location. Explain their significance. Intermediate High
  15. 15. How do we move students to this point? ● Let go of the errors ○ Too much focus on errors kills communication & motivation ● Provide students with the tools ○ Vocab, expressions, framework ● Clarify the role of memorization
  16. 16. Now it’s your turn! Partner Work: On the next slide you will see a new picture. Talk about how you would scaffold speaking activities across levels in a way that helps students develop their proficiency. Novice Beginning Intermediate Intermediate Mid Intermediate High
  17. 17. 10 min. break Any questions so far?
  18. 18. How to get students reading Interpretive mode
  19. 19. Intermediate-High ACTFL Descriptor: Reading At the Intermediate High level, readers are able to understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics to which the reader brings personal interest or knowledge. These readers are also able to understand some connected texts featuring description and narration although there will be occasional gaps in understanding due to a limited knowledge of the vocabulary, structures, and writing conventions of the language.
  20. 20. ● high interest & very visual (sources: pinterest, instagram) ● authentic yet related to in-class themes ● challenging texts + doable tasks = student confidence (scaffold/extend)
  21. 21. Intermediate Mid ● Task 1: Choral Reading: Getting familiar with the text ○ Read between the punctuation marks for fluency ○ Read for meaning ○ Dissect the text ● Task 2: Building Interest & Previewing the Story ○ Brainstorm questions with group ○ Question & answer with Lencho “Lencho is an uneducated man, however he knows how to write. The next day, after reminding himself that there is someone out there to protect him, he writes a letter and takes it to town to mail it.”
  22. 22. How do we move students to this point? Structure reading tasks in a way that: ● helps students let go of the need to understand every word ● instills the value of re-reading ● helps students make connections ● focuses on the message ○ Don’t let go of the main idea when little details begin to overwhelm
  23. 23. Reflect with a partner... ● How do you address learners’ anxiety about communicating and understanding target language? ● What are practices that you currently employ to develop abilities and self-confidence? ● What would you like to do in the future to help students develop their abilities and self-confidence?
  24. 24. Links to Recording Tools ● vocaroo - free online voice recorder ● Voice Memos - free app for iPhone (comes with phone) ● quickvoice - free voice recorder app for iPad ● Google Voice - students can call and leave a message ● Lingt Language - teacher can pose spoken questions and students can record their answers.
  25. 25. Links to Listening Resources ● UTexas: Videos by subject/level/etc. ● Utexas: Videos by subject/proficiency level ● Vialogues: Flipped Lessons using youtube videos ● Ver-Taal: Listening passages with activities to go along with them ● Dialectos: Videos by topic or linguistic feature ● Zachary Jones: Songs by topic or linguistic feature ● Bablingua: Short videos about different topics ● Notes in Spanish: Podcasts by topic or level ● Podcasts in Spanish: Podcasts by level ● Audiria: Short videos with exercises ● AudioLingua: Podcasts by topic or level
  26. 26. Danke! ¡Gracias! Merci! Becky Searls bsearls@uaschools.org Kristy Picker kpicker@uaschools.org Richard Duarte rduarte@uaschools.org Tricia Fellinger tfellinger@uaschools.org

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