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Presentation Skills Be As Good as Obama

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Presentation Skills Be As Good as Obama

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This presentation will provide you with knowledge, tools and techniques to help you to prepare and deliver polished powerful presentations. With this all you'll ever need to be is yourself.

This presentation will provide you with knowledge, tools and techniques to help you to prepare and deliver polished powerful presentations. With this all you'll ever need to be is yourself.

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Presentation Skills Be As Good as Obama

  1. 1. www.practicalbusinessskills.com Presentation Skills - How to be as good as Obama
  2. 2. ……Or As Good as This www.practicalbusinessskills.com …. ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country….see over https://youtu.be/PzRg--jhO8g
  3. 3. Presentation Skills – Overcoming the Fear It’s been said that the majority of people would rather die than give a presentation, this may be over stating it somewhat but it is a fact of life that giving presentations is a huge fear for most of us. This Presentation will improve your ability to deliver polished, professional and powerful presentations. The Fear of Public Speaking. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  4. 4. Presentations are usually either informational or persuasive and when looked atin the broadest terms there are four basic purposes when giving them:  To inform  To persuade  To build good will  To elicit a call to action Presentations – What They Are For www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  5. 5. Presentation Skills – Three Phases  Planning and Preparation  Structuring the Content  Delivery and Close www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  6. 6. Presentation Skills – Three Phases  Planning and Preparation  Structuring the Content and Delivery  Delivery and Close www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  7. 7. Preparation is Key Preparation is Key Abraham Lincoln stated that if he had eight hours to cut down a tree he’d spend six hours sharpening the axe www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  8. 8. Planning & Preparation  Goals and Objectives  Context of your Presentation  Audience Strategy  Creating Messages that Motivate www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  9. 9. Goals & Objectives You must have a clear understanding of why you are giving the presentation and what you want to achieve, you need to understand clearly the Outcomes you want. Prepare by documenting your Goals and Objectives beforehand, The advantages are twofold, one it will help you to plan properly and during the delivery you can refer back. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  10. 10. For example a CFO of a company may wish to give a presentation that provides confidence (goal) to the analyst community with the objectives of consolidating or improving share value and persuading personal investors and financial institutions to further invest in his company. Goals & Objectives We are doing great - profits increasing on year ! www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  11. 11. Understand the Context of the Presentation Ask yourself the following questions:  What is the broader concern underlying the need for the presentation?  What primary issues underlie the presentation?  How does your presentation relate to these issues?  What will be happening in the organization when you make your presentation? We are doing great - profits increasing on year ! www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  12. 12. When preparing the presentation try to understand the DNA of the audience.  Demographic, including age, occupation, responsibilities, personal background  Needs and Interests including their current knowledge of the subject  Attitudes regarding you, your organisation, your subject and your point of view Try to understand why they are there in the first place, are they committed and present of their own free will, sent by their employer or some other reason. Audience Strategy www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  13. 13.  Are your supporting arguments understandable to the audience  Will the content enlist the audience concurrence  Are logical connections explicit  What other arguments need to be developed  What contrary arguments do you need to neutralise  When is it important to get audience participation, reaction or buy-in Messages that Motivate – “…I have a Dream… Is the key message(s) selected actually the most critical, does it support the objectives of you’ve set www.practicalbusinessskills.com https://youtu.be/3vDWWy4CMhE
  14. 14. Messages that Motivate Ask yourself what else you can do or say that may help persuade the audience.  You need a combination of logic and emotion to convince them.  Your persuasiveness is largely down to your enthusiasm, credibility and personal belief being put across.  If you aren’t sure about the impact of a point leave it out.  You also need to keep it simple and concise. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  15. 15.  Planning and Preparation Structuring the Content  Delivery and Close Presentation Skills – Three Phases www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  16. 16. Structuring the Content  The Opening  The Body – Stated Points of View and Key Supporting Points  The Close – Creating a Powerful Conclusion  The Power of Visuals As a framework you need an opening, body and a close - beginning, middle and end………15%, 70%, 15% is a decent timeline rule of thumb. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  17. 17. The Opening You will use the opening to  Establish your own credibility,  Define the purpose of the presentation  Describe for the audience WIIFT – What is in it for them  Preview briefly the main points to be covered You need to open with a ‘hook’ to gain the audience’s interest and attention. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  18. 18. The Opening You need to open with a ‘hook’ to gain the audience’s interest and attention. Consider some of the following:  A quotation  A reference  An analogy  A statement – controversial perhaps  A relevant, maybe personal story  A question………can I ask you to consider…… call to action www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  19. 19. www.practicalbusinessskills.com The Body - Stated Points of view  Phrase the situation, problem, opportunity or call to action in relation to the audience  Help the audience visualise the situation, need, opportunity or call to action  Involve the audience in the development of a path forward  Ensure the urgency of proposals matches the needs of the situation  Remember - no more than 3 key points to underpin and support. Here you want to:
  20. 20. …. ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. After announcing that you are closing out the presentation  Relate the conclusion back to your introduction,  Restate the main points you want your audience to remember,  Repeat calls to action where required. The Close - Creating a Powerful Conclusion The closing statement is a very important part of your presentation as people are most likely to remember what they heard not only first but last. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  21. 21. Here you want to:  Reiterate the presentation’s key message(s)  Integrate opening points into closing comments  Suggest agreement  Recommend actions  Obtain commitment and buy-in  Provide Closure  Try to leave the audience with the feeling that they got what they came for. The Close - Creating a Powerful Conclusion Note: leave 10-15% of speaking time to be the conclusion of your presentation. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  22. 22. The Power of Visuals Research has shown that:-  People gain 75% of what they know visually  Words and pictures together are 6 times more effective in conveying information than words alone  Presentations using visuals can be 43% more persuasive than presentations without them “a picture is worth a thousand words “. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  23. 23. Keep visuals big, bold and brilliant. Big. The content of a visual should be large enough to be seen by the entire audience. Bold. Visual content should be prominent and clear . Brilliant. Use more than one colour per visual. Colours trigger emotions and help emphasize key points. The Power of Visuals www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  24. 24. Keep visuals big, bold and brilliant.  Maintain a consistent format, for example using same text styles instead of mix and match.  Colour. Colour attracts attention, adds vitality and increases people’s willingness to read.  Colour can make your visuals more attractive, vivid and memorable, can highlight important points and helps to organise The Power of Visuals www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  25. 25. Presentation Skills – Three Phases  Planning and Preparation  Structuring the Content and Delivery  Delivery and Close www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  26. 26. There is the presentation you prepared for, the presentation you gave, and the one you wish you gave………….” Delivery & Close www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  27. 27. The key point is to rehearse, rehearse, rehearse Always write out your full presentation to begin with and use this as the initial draft for rehearsal. On rehearsal, practicing out loud, record the spoken presentation. Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  28. 28. Gain Control of the Group In any group of people in a presenting context the group will unconsciously seek for someone to be in control. If it isn’t you it will be someone else. It is therefore essential to take control right at the beginning of your presentation. One way of doing this is to get your audience to do something you want, even something very simple - e.g. ladies and gentlemen we are going to start now, can you all please take your seat ? www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  29. 29. You can build rapport with someone by matching their ways of communicating:-  Use their jargon, their terminology  Use their same tonality, say the words the way they do  Adopt the same physiology – use the same posture and gestures Creating Rapport Building rapport - to be a great presenter you need to establish rapport. People create rapport or a bond with others by finding shared experiences…something in common www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  30. 30. Eliciting Positive States in the Audience As the presenter you want your audience to be in the ideal state for receiving and processing the information you are offering you and it is your responsibility to know how to do this.  Remember - most of what and how you are communicating is non-verbal.  If you want your audience to be motivated be motivated yourself, people will follow you.  Ask the audience to remember a time in the past when they were in the desired state e.g. excited  Ask them to imagine a time in the future when they will be in the desired state.  Tell them a story or metaphor www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  31. 31. Managing the Delivery You will achieve your best performance speaking effectively, projecting a positive image and keeping your audience engaged. most of what and how you are communicating is non-verbal. Studies have shown that in human communication only  7% of the meaning is carried in the actual words used.  38% is in the way you say the words (tonality) and  55% in the physiology – the way you posture, stand, hold our body, breath, gesture, facial expressions you have. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  32. 32. Using Your Voice  Keep the tone of your voice natural and conversational  Speak loudly enough for everyone to hear  Use a microphone if needed  Be expressive, do not speak in a monotone. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  33. 33. Using Your Voice  Raise and lower your voice to make a point  Enunciate and pronounce words clearly  Breathe avoiding ums, ers and aahs  Do not talk from script (ok to check notes)  Make presentation conversational www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  34. 34. Project a Positive Image  Project confidence through your dress and presence  Make sure your facial expressions convey interest in your audience  Make and maintain eye contact with audience members  Gesture in a natural way  Dovetail outcomes to their outcomes www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  35. 35. Keep the Audience Engaged  Change what you are doing or how you are speaking……a pause or vocal tone  Ask questions (being you’ll prepared with the answer)  Ask for a show of hands  Provide analogies and vivid examples  Introduce personal stories www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  36. 36. Keep the Audience Engaged  Employ compelling statistics, expert testimony  Use visuals to good effect  Use movement when you want control  Watch audience for Non Verbal Communication about responses www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  37. 37. Duration  Make the presentation as long as it needs to be to convey your key message clearly and completely  Make it only long enough to be clear and complete within the allocated time  It is better to make fewer points and make them well  If you do not have enough time to make a point clear or acceptable to your audience save it for another day www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  38. 38. Duration  Ending early is better than not completing the talk or having to rush through at the end  Plan and prioritise beforehand on what to delete if your time is cut short  Ensure time at the end for questions as a matter of courtesy.  Allow 75% of your allocated time to the presentation, this provides some inherent slack www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  39. 39. Times It is worth giving consideration to the timing of the presentation. Certain days of the week and selected times of day are better than others for to allow your participants to be present, on time and ready to engage productively.  It is usually prudent to avoid late afternoons before an upcoming holiday or week- end.  The same goes for an early morning meeting first thing on the return back.  Give due consideration also to the preparation time you need prior to the presentation. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  40. 40. Location & Venue Venue rooms and their furnishings will contribute significantly to an effective presentation. When facilities are right they go unnoticed. When they are inadequate or too elaborate they can detract from a meeting. On-site presentations are usually convenient and low cost, however this can sometimes mean being convenient for interruptions as people are easily accessible or can ‘disappear’ Be willing to look elsewhere as is necessary. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  41. 41. Location & Venue The need for people to be physically comfortable should not be overlooked and heating, lighting and ventilation should be adequate for the size of the group and activities planned. Information presentations should have participants facing the front of the room and be sure to complete an equipment checklist prior to the presentation to ensure all of the electronic equipment in particular is working. www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  42. 42. Presentation Checklist - Do’s Do’s  Do prepare properly  Do understand the purpose of your presentation and the outcomes you want  Do understand the Context of the presentation  Do understand your Audience as much as possible – their DNA  Do understand the importance of the Opening and grabbing the audience’s attention  Do understand the importance of creating a Powerful Conclusion (Close)  Do tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them and tell them what you told them  Do Select Messages that Motivate  Do Review your Key Messages of support www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  43. 43. Presentation Checklist - Do’s Do’s  Do understand the type of Arguments you might face  Do understand the importance of strong visuals - people gain 75% of what they know visually  Do keep visuals simple and concise  Do keep visuals big, bold, brilliant and colourful  Do Rehearse, Rehearse and Rehearse  Do Be Yourself  Do build Rapport with the audience  Do gain control of your audience or group  Do use your Voice to its best advantage www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  44. 44. Don’ts List Presentation Checklist - Dont’s  Don’t let fear overcome you – rehearse, rehearse, rehearse  Don’t forget to let the audience know who you are  Don’t let detail and complexity get in the way of the message  Don’t talk from a script  Don’t um and aaah  Don’t be one-toned, one paced vocally  Don’t hide behind the lectern  Don’t present too long  Don’t forget to BE YOURSELF ! www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  45. 45. Being yourself Being you is all you will ever need. It is ok to be yourself, the more of you that is available to the audience the more You will be able to connect, bond and feel more comfortable with you. Conclusion & Final Thought Good Luck ! www.practicalbusinessskills.com
  46. 46. About the Author Introduction Hi, I’m Billy Hughes MSc MCIPS. I’ve been operating in the global business world for over twenty-five years, fifteen of those in senior Purchasing and Procurement Management positions in both the Public and Private sectors, and a further ten in leadership roles in Sales & Marketing working with and for a number of world class companies. www.practicalbusinessskills.com

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