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Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children: Driving Change in Early Education

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Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children: Driving Change in Early Education

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Sponsored by Brookes Publishing

WATCH THE EDWEBINAR RECORDING AT OUR EDWEB COMMUNITY TODAY: http://bit.ly/EdWebTeachAll

Wouldn’t it be great if every child could participate in an early education program with evidence-based instruction, and receive appropriate levels of instructional interventions to achieve the best possible early academic and behavioral outcomes?

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS)—a framework grounded in delivering evidence-based instruction of various intensity levels—can ensure that young children learn essential early academic and behavioral skills. In this edWebinar, discover how to successfully use a data-based decision-making process to match children’s needs with universal, strategic, or intensive instruction in a tiered model. Early education experts Judith J. Carta, Ph.D., and Robin Miller Young, Ed.D., NCSP, introduce MTSS as a system-wide, prevention-oriented framework for delivering efficient services and supports that meet the needs of all young children and their families.

In this recorded session, learn to:
- Articulate the MTSS framework’s core components that help improve outcomes for children and families and contrast these components with those that typically exist in early learning settings
- State how to use a data-based decision-making process to identify children who might need more intensive educational interventions and to monitor their progress during intervention
- Describe a multi-tiered intervention model for early learning programs
- Advocate for moving to an MTSS framework to drive change in early education across multiple system levels

This recorded edWebinar is ideal for all early childhood professionals. Learn how MTSS can help all young children achieve critical early learning outcomes and get ready for success in school.

Originally broadcast: February 7, 2019

Join the Teaching All Students: Practical Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms community to network with educators, participate in online discussions, receive invitations to upcoming edWebinars, and view past edWebinars to earn CE certificates.

JOIN OUR EDWEB COMMUNITY TODAY: http://bit.ly/EdWebTeachAll

Sponsored by Brookes Publishing

WATCH THE EDWEBINAR RECORDING AT OUR EDWEB COMMUNITY TODAY: http://bit.ly/EdWebTeachAll

Wouldn’t it be great if every child could participate in an early education program with evidence-based instruction, and receive appropriate levels of instructional interventions to achieve the best possible early academic and behavioral outcomes?

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS)—a framework grounded in delivering evidence-based instruction of various intensity levels—can ensure that young children learn essential early academic and behavioral skills. In this edWebinar, discover how to successfully use a data-based decision-making process to match children’s needs with universal, strategic, or intensive instruction in a tiered model. Early education experts Judith J. Carta, Ph.D., and Robin Miller Young, Ed.D., NCSP, introduce MTSS as a system-wide, prevention-oriented framework for delivering efficient services and supports that meet the needs of all young children and their families.

In this recorded session, learn to:
- Articulate the MTSS framework’s core components that help improve outcomes for children and families and contrast these components with those that typically exist in early learning settings
- State how to use a data-based decision-making process to identify children who might need more intensive educational interventions and to monitor their progress during intervention
- Describe a multi-tiered intervention model for early learning programs
- Advocate for moving to an MTSS framework to drive change in early education across multiple system levels

This recorded edWebinar is ideal for all early childhood professionals. Learn how MTSS can help all young children achieve critical early learning outcomes and get ready for success in school.

Originally broadcast: February 7, 2019

Join the Teaching All Students: Practical Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms community to network with educators, participate in online discussions, receive invitations to upcoming edWebinars, and view past edWebinars to earn CE certificates.

JOIN OUR EDWEB COMMUNITY TODAY: http://bit.ly/EdWebTeachAll

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Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children: Driving Change in Early Education

  1. 1. Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children: Driving Change in Early Education Presented by Judy Carta & Robin Miller Young University of Kansas & Northern Illinois University
  2. 2. • Close other applications that use bandwidth or resources on your device. • For audio issues you can switch to phone by clicking the telephone icon at the top of your screen. • Ask a question by clicking the question mark at the top of your screen. • Post in the chat to join the live discussion. • For a larger view of the slides or to hide the chat, click the full screen icon on the upper right of your screen. • If you’re on Twitter tweet using #edWebinar and #MyMsJenTakeAway Here are some edWebinar tips …
  3. 3. Get your CE Certificate for this edWebinar Your personalized CE certificate will be posted to your edWebinar transcript by the end of the next business day. Join at: www.edweb.net/ inclusiveeducation Join the community and go to the edWebinar archives for the recording, slides, chat log, and any resources after this edWebinar.
  4. 4. ✓ Invitations to upcoming webinars ✓ Webinar recordings and resources ✓ CE quizzes ✓ Online discussions www.edweb.net/inclusiveeducation You’ll receive the following benefits: Join our free community! Teaching All Students To join, go to:
  5. 5. SPECIAL OFFER • Save 20%* at brookespublishing.com with code EDWEBCM *Expires 3/31/19. Not to be combined with any other discounts or offers. Consumer orders only, please. Excludes BOL training, pre-discounted bundles, and online products such as ASQ Online and AEPSinteractive™.
  6. 6. GIVEAWAY We’re giving away three free copies of Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children! •Three attendees will be selected at random & announced after the Q&A. Stay active in the chat to increase your chances!
  7. 7. Dr. Judith Carta is a senior scientist in the Institute for Life Span Studies and Professor of Special Education at the University of Kansas. She has directed several federally funded research centers and projects focused on developing practices that teachers and parents can use to promote children’s early learning particularly in vulnerable populations. She was the co-director of the Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood. She currently co-directs the Bridging the Word Gap Research Network. She was formerly a preschool teacher of young children with special needs. She and Dr. Robin Miller Young are the co-editors of the recently released Multi-Tiered Systems of Support: Driving Change in Early Education by Paul Brookes Publishers. Dr. Robin Miller Young is an assistant professor of early childhood education at Northern Illinois University, preparing future educators to employ evidence-based practices to meet families’ and children’s needs. Prior to NIU, Dr. Young guided development of MTSS frameworks while serving on leadership teams at a blended/inclusive, award-winning preschool honored for its MTSS literacy-building and social- emotional/PBIS practices. She and Dr. Judith Carta (University of Kansas) have co-edited a book and six videos titled MTSS for Young Children: Driving Change in Early Education (October 2018); Dr. Young also authored chapters on leadership, using implementation science to move programs into MTSS frameworks, and meeting the needs of children with disabilities in an MTSS framework. She is currently examining preparation of school leaders who engage in shared-leadership strategies that move early learning programs into effective and efficient MTSS frameworks; she also provides coaching and consultative support for programs who want to move into MTSS frameworks.
  8. 8. POLL: Who’s participating today? ⊡ What is your current role?
  9. 9. POLL: What’s your past history with MTSS? ⊡ What is your current knowledge/past experience with MTSS?
  10. 10. What is MTSS? ⊡ A whole-school data-driven framework for improving learning outcomes for ALL students delivered through a continuum of evidence-based practices and systems.
  11. 11. What is MTSS? ⊡ A whole-school data-driven framework for improving learning outcomes for ALL students delivered through a continuum of evidence-based practices and systems. ⊡ Goal: to identify children who may be struggling to learn and intervene early so they can catch up to their peers.
  12. 12. What is MTSS? ⊡ A whole-school data-driven framework for improving learning outcomes for ALL students delivered through a continuum of evidence-based practices and systems. ⊡ Goal: to identify children who may be struggling to learn and intervene early so they can catch up to their peers. ⊡ It can be designed to identify children who are struggling in academic or behavioral areas.
  13. 13. ⊡ Just added support for academics ⊡ The responsibility of just a few specialists—general educators are key! ⊡ An excuse for delaying a special education MTSS is not…
  14. 14. How is MTSS different from typical practice in early education? ⊡ We typically don’t usually systematically address the range of individual differences in general early education settings. ⊡ We typically wait for significant delays before we provide additional support (and then it is a referral to special education).
  15. 15. How is MTSS different from typical practice in early education? ⊡ MTSS identifies who needs the additional support and provides a continuum of evidence-based practices within the general education settings. ⊡ The focus of MTSS is prevention—providing additional support as soon as it’s needed for success. ⊡ We use proven instructional strategies that can help struggling students close the performance gap with typically developing students.
  16. 16. 1. All children can learn and achieve….when they are provided with high quality supports to match their needs. 2. Instruction should focus on both academic and behavioral goals. 3. Children showing signs of delay should be identified as early as possible and should be provided with a level of instructional intensity to match their needs. Core Principles of MTSS
  17. 17. 4. Interventions to address children’s needs should be designed by collaborative teams. 5. Interventions should be informed by evidence-based practices and guided by student data. 6. Children’s responses to intervention should be continuously monitored. 7. All intervention should be based on evidence-based practices and implemented with fidelity. Core Principles of MTSS
  18. 18. Core Components of MTSS
  19. 19. Layered Continuum of Supports
  20. 20. Evidence-Based Practices ⊡ What are they and why are they the best starting point?
  21. 21. ⊡ “proven techniques” ⊡ Few practices in EC meet the strict definition of EBP but there are some ⊡ Even practices with strong evidence may not work for all children. ⊡ Practitioners can provide their own evidence through progress monitoring data: Practice-based evidence Evidence-based practices are the foundation
  22. 22. Observing Fidelity of Interventions: Why so important? ⊡ Interventions implemented with low or inconsistent fidelity are less likely to work—children won’t show change. ⊡ Without measurement of fidelity, you don’t know if the child needs a different intervention, a more intensive intervention, or the same intervention with better implementation. LESSON: Make sure an intervention is being implemented correctly before recommending changes to it.
  23. 23. Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Universal Screening Phase 1 Universal Screening Phase 2 Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Progress Monitoring Progress Monitoring
  24. 24. Data-Based Problem-Solving and Decision-Making Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi-tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 75). Baltimore, MD. Paul H. Brookes Figure 4.1. Steps of the problem-solving model.
  25. 25. What is High Quality Tier 1? ⊡ How does a program know when they have/don’t have a strong Tier 1? ⊡ Factors to consider when evaluating Tier 1: □ curriculum, instruction, and child data ⊡ What happens when Tier 1 is not strong? ⊡ Using professional development and ongoing coaching to ensure continuous quality of Tier 1 implementation.
  26. 26. ⊡ Oral language/Vocabulary ⊡ Comprehension ⊡ Phonemic Awareness ⊡ Alphabet Knowledge ⊡ World of Words (Vocabulary) (Neuman) ⊡ Dialogic Reading (Whitehurst) ⊡ Explicit Instruction (Archer) ⊡ I do, We do, You do Essential Ingredients in Tier 1 Early Literacy Focus on 4 Key Content Areas that lay the foundation for reading Evidence-Based Practices
  27. 27. Tune-up Checklist DATE GOAL COMPLETE: Reflection Questions Area of need: PA PAK V/OL COMP Reflection Questions Circle One Content of Instruction YES NO • Is there an established routine to teach the skill? YES NO • Can instruction be more concrete with physical objects? YES NO Opportunities to Learn YES NO • Does lesson plan/instruction provide many opportunities to respond? YES NO • Can the skill be emphasized during another part of the day? YES NO Source: Abbott et al., 2012
  28. 28. Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Universal Screening Phase 1 Universal Screening Phase 2 Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Progress Monitoring Progress Monitoring
  29. 29. ⊡ PURPOSE: determines how well core curriculum is working for the majority of students ⊡ FOCUS: all students ⊡ TOOLS: very brief assessments on key elements of the curriculum; these are NOT the same as developmental screening tools ⊡ TIMEFRAME: students are usually assessed three times a year Universal Screening
  30. 30. PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: What level of support is needed across the entire classroom group?
  31. 31. Two Different Tiered Models
  32. 32. Progress Monitoring ⊡ PURPOSE: monitor students’ response to instruction in order to estimate rates of improvement, identify students who are not demonstrating adequate progress ⊡ FOCUS: students identified through screening as at risk for poor learning outcomes ⊡ TOOLS: brief assessments that are valid, reliable, and evidence based ⊡ TIMEFRAME: students are assessed at regular intervals (e.g., weekly, biweekly, or monthly
  33. 33. ⊡ Identifying % of children needing extra instructional support ⊡ Two models for providing Tier 2 support: ⊡ Problem solving approach: Individualized, team and family identify ways to meet child’s instructional needs (more explicit instruction, more opportunities) Tier 2—how to provide additional support
  34. 34. ⊡ Standard protocol: Standard evidence-based approaches that target a specific area of need for groups of students ⊡ Examples: Story Friends; Read it Again-Prek, Story Champs in Early Literacy Tier 2—how to provide additional support
  35. 35. http://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu
  36. 36. Example of Progress Monitoring before and after a Tier 2 intervention for Early Communication
  37. 37. Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Universal Screening Phase 1 Universal Screening Phase 2 Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Progress Monitoring Progress Monitoring
  38. 38. ⊡ Is for children not making adequate progress in response to Tier 2 ⊡ Is supplemental instruction that is more intensive than Tier 2 ⊡ Can be offered in different instructional domains (e.g., language/literacy, social-emotional) Tier 3
  39. 39. ⊡ Features include: □ Focus on prioritized content □ Systematic instruction with carefully designed scope and sequence □ Explicit instruction □ Increased opportunities to respond □ Individualized instruction □ More frequent progress monitoring Tier 3
  40. 40. Decisions about HOW TO IMPLEMENT TIERED APPROACH
  41. 41. MTSS relies on partnerships
  42. 42. Shared Leadership provides direction
  43. 43. A few words about special groups & MTSS ⊡ Children with disabilities □ might receive instruction at any tier in an inclusive classroom. □ Children do NOT need to go through the MTSS process order to be referred for special education.
  44. 44. A few words about special groups & MTSS ⊡ Dual language learners □ Assessments (universal screening and progress monitoring) need to conducted in home language with valid instruments □ Can be at any level of MTSS □ Strengthening Tier 1 with use of home language, language bridging techniques can help dual language learners be successful
  45. 45. Engaging Families in MTSS ⊡ As programs build MTSS programs, they need to focus on systematic planning for ways to engage families
  46. 46. Engaging Families in MTSS ⊡ Specific areas for building staff competence in family engagement include: □ Communication skills □ Understanding of family values and practices □ Focusing on cultural awareness and sensitivity □ Learning how to help the family feel welcome in the school, with the team
  47. 47. Why do MTSS? ⊡ All children get the level of instruction that meets their needs ⊡ Prevention of delays and disabilities—better than “wait to fail” ⊡ Early intervention is more effective and less costly than later remediation. ⊡ Continuous progress monitoring ensures that children don’t get “stuck” receiving ineffective instruction. ⊡ Data-based decision-making fosters team members moving in the same direction.
  48. 48. POLL ⊡ What do you think is the most important reason to do MTSS? 49
  49. 49. Data-based decision making SHIFT TO A SYSTEM APPROACH: ⊡ All system levels, school/program, classroom, and individual-child levels, will use it. ⊡ Students’ needs will have a “Just Right” match to interventions, progress will be monitored, intervention plan will be modified as necessary, to achieve success!
  50. 50. Data-based decision making SHIFT CULTURE: Data & EBPs ⊡ Data and evidence-based practices drive program vision; who to teach (Inclusive/Blended model). ⊡ What will be taught, what methods will be used to teach, where will teaching take place, etc., ⊡ Essential outcomes achieved by children and families.
  51. 51. Strengths-based Problem-Solving SCHOOL/PROGRAM Level: ⊡ How are all children performing in core? Compare current indicators with expected or desired goals. ⊡ Identify needed improvements. Make program changes, implement with fidelity, and monitor progress. ⊡ Compare students’ performance and growth to goals. Determine next steps.
  52. 52. Strengths-based Problem-Solving CLASSROOM Level: ⊡ Core curriculum should be meeting most students’ needs. ⊡ So, which children need supports? ⊡ Arrange small groups to provide targeted interventions (standard protocol if possible). Implement with fidelity; ⊡ monitor progress. ⊡ Compare student performance and growth to goals. Determine next steps.
  53. 53. INDIVIDUAL-CHILD Level: ⊡ Core curriculum plus strategic interventions should be meeting almost all children’s needs. ⊡ So, which children require intensive interventions that include more individually-designed supports? ⊡ Follow steps 2 and 3 on previous slide. Strengths-based Problem-Solving
  54. 54. Data-Based Problem-Solving and Decision-Making Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi-tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 75). Baltimore, MD. Paul H. Brookes Figure 4.1. Steps of the problem-solving model.
  55. 55. Problem Identification ⊡ Is there a difference between current performance and expected or desired performance? ⊡ What is the goal relative to the expected/desired performance? Decision: If there is a problem, move to Problem Analysis phase. Problem-Solving Model Steps: Continuous Improvement Process Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), (2019)
  56. 56. Problem Analysis ⊡ Why does the problem exist? ⊡ What factors could be contributing to the problem that we can address? ⊡ What resources are required to address the problem? Decision: Once the problem is understood, move to Intervention Implementation phase. Problem-Solving Model Steps: Continuous Improvement Process Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), (2019)
  57. 57. Intervention Implementation ⊡ What can be done to reduce the difference between current and expected/desired performance? ⊡ What supports are needed to ensure strong intervention implementation? Decision: Match child’s (children’s) strengths and needs to intervention, implement, and then do Plan Evaluation. Problem-Solving Model Steps: Continuous Improvement Process Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), (2019)
  58. 58. Plan Evaluation ⊡ How is/are the student(s) responding? ⊡ How is the plan working? ⊡ Has the difference between current and expected/ desired performance been reduced to satisfactory level? ⊡ What are the next steps? Decision: If the problem still exists, implement modified plan. If problem does not exist, end intervention. Problem-Solving Model Steps: Continuous Improvement Process Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), (2019)
  59. 59. Case Example of Henry
  60. 60. Universal Screening Data-Vocabulary
  61. 61. Problem Identification PI meeting: What was learned . . . □ After Core vocabulary instruction, some children were not “Proficient”. □ Teacher provided a supplemental, evidence-based, packaged, Tier 2 vocabulary intervention ; now, most students are proficient. □ Henry is one of two students will need more intensive, individually-designed vocabulary intervention (see graph on previous slide). Problem Solving Example for One Child
  62. 62. Problem Identification PI decision: Plan PA meeting w/ Henry’s parents & grandmother □ Check results of screening: overall developmental, and vision & hearing. □ Review performance on words targeted in last unit of study. □ Review knowledge of commonly known preschool words. Problem Solving Example for One Child
  63. 63. Problem Analysis PA meeting: What was learned . . . □ Henry passed hearing screening but has history of ear infections. □ He is developing well in all areas except vocabulary. □ He responded well to IDEAS strategy (Tier 2) but may need more time in the intervention.
  64. 64. Problem Analysis PA Decision: An Intervention Plan was developed: □ Provide IDEAS strategy for 5 minutes/day in one-to-one format. □ Share target words for at-home practice. □ Use pictures in storybooks to build word knowledge and usage.
  65. 65. Plan Evaluation: First Meeting Review Intervention Plan results: □ Grandmother and Henry read stories at home with target words. □ Embedding words into home routines at home is working well. □ Still receiving only 2/5 minutes of scheduled time in IDEAS strategies with paraprofessional; team needs to ensure he gets all 5 minutes. □ Communicate plan revision to parents.
  66. 66. Universal Screening Data-Vocabulary One Classroom
  67. 67. Plan Evaluation: Second Time Review Intervention Plan impact: □ Parents and grandparent say home language use is much improved. □ Staff reports Henry uses many new words across classroom routines. □ Henry now scoring in Proficient Range on the Universal Screener □ Conference arranged with Henry’s kindergarten teacher; progress will be monitored.
  68. 68. JC: Check for any questions from the “Chat Room” that have been typed while Robin was presenting. . .
  69. 69. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on service delivery SYSTEM: ⊡ Purpose: Internal parts are organized and arranged to interact so young children achieve early learning outcomes.
  70. 70. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on service delivery SYSTEM: ⊡ Purpose: Internal parts are organized and arranged to interact so young children achieve early learning outcomes. ⊡ Infrastructure (Components): Who will be served, what will they learn, what teaching methods will be used, where will teaching occur, etc.
  71. 71. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on service delivery SYSTEM: ⊡ Purpose: Internal parts are organized and arranged to interact so young children achieve early learning outcomes. ⊡ Infrastructure (Components): Who will be served, what will they learn, what teaching methods will be used, where will teaching occur, etc. ⊡ Processes (Procedures): How a supportive culture will be created, how teams will be created, how decisions will be made, how rules will be made and laws followed.
  72. 72. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on PROGRAMS and SCHOOLS: ⊡ Rationale: Services are delivered to programs and schools, and outcomes are measured at this level, so this is where we focus change.
  73. 73. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on PROGRAMS and SCHOOLS: ⊡ Rationale: Services are delivered to programs and schools, and outcomes are measured at this level, so this is where we focus change. ⊡ Leaders: Held accountable for results, have legitimate authority to make changes, must shift culture, and support staff through change process
  74. 74. Leadership: Shifting into an MTSS Framework Focus on PROGRAMS and SCHOOLS: ⊡ Rationale: Services are delivered to programs and schools, and outcomes are measured at this level, so this is where we focus change. ⊡ Leaders: Held accountable for results, have legitimate authority to make changes, must shift culture, and support staff through change process ⊡ Resource: Leader’s Role in MTSS
  75. 75. Vision: What kind of organization do we want to be? Resource: Example vision, mission, core values, guiding practices and standard operating procedures.
  76. 76. Exploring: Is MTSS the right initiative for your program or school? Exploration Stage: ⊡ Tasks: Assess needs, examine intervention components, consider implementation drivers, and assess “goodness-of-fit” of proposed new practice. ⊡ Resource: Appendix 3B: Multi-tiered Systems of Support in Early Childhood: Stage of Implementation Analysis.
  77. 77. Show MTSS for Young Children Video #1: Consensus-Building (available on the Brookes Publishing website. Start at 4:53–ending)
  78. 78. Instructional Leadership Team
  79. 79. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) ⊡ Roles and Responsibilities ⊡ Norms for Interaction/ ⊡ Collective Commitments ⊡ Goals Aligned with Vision and Mission ⊡ Clear Purpose ⊡ Decision Making-Process ⊡ Processes for Accomplishing Purpose Resource: MTSS Annotated Resource List
  80. 80. Organizational Culture: Trustworthy “It is a greater compliment to be trusted than to be loved.” --George MacDonald
  81. 81. Initial High Quality Training and On-going Practice-Based Coaching are Essential
  82. 82. Our Vision for MTSS in Early Education Wouldn’t it be great if. . . ⊡ Every child could participate in an early education program with evidence-based instruction, ⊡ and receive appropriate levels of instructional interventions ⊡ to achieve the best possible early academic and behavioral outcomes?
  83. 83. References • Hojnoski, R.L., & Polignano, J.C. (2019). Figure 4.1 Steps of the problem-solving model. Source: Batsche, G. et al., 2005. Cited in J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi-tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 75). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. • McElhattan, T., Carta, J. & Young, R. M. (2015). Annotated resources: MTSS/RTI in early childhood. Retried from http://www.crtiec.dept.ku.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/MTSS-Annotated-Resource-List-10-20-15.pdf • Shields, L. (2011). The leader’s role: RTI in early childhood settings [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.crtiec.dept.ku.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/MTSS_RtI-in-EC-Leadership-Consensus-PD-Blog- Entries-9-21-17.pdf. • Young, R.M (2019). Figure 2.3 Example of early childhood program/school Instructional Leadership Team membership. J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi-tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 27-28). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. • Young, R.M (2019). Figure 2.4 Example vision, mission, core values, guiding practices, and standard operating procedures. J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi-tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 29). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. • Young, R.M. (2019). Table 2.1 Example Professional Communities (PLCs) collaborative teams’ Smart goal end-of- year reflections. J.J. Carta & R.M. Young (Eds.), Multi tiered systems of support for young children: Driving change in early education (p. 29). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  84. 84. Measures and Interventions Cited • CIRCLE Progress Monitoring: https://cliengage.org/public/training/support/how-to-guides/circle-progress- monitoring-user-guide/. • Developing Talkers: https://developingtalkers.org/. • Dialogic Reading—Reading Rockets: http://www.readingrockets.org/article/dialogic-reading-effective-way-read- aloud-young-children. • Explicit Instruction—Archer & Hughes: https://explicitinstruction.org/. • myIGDIs-- https://www.myigdis.com/. • Path to Literacy: https://products.brookespublishing.com/PAth-to-Literacy-P965.aspx. • Pyramid Model—National Center for Pyramid Model Innovation: http://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu/. • Read It Again Pre-K: https://earlychildhood.ehe.osu.edu/research/practice/read-it-again-prek/ • Story Champs: https://www.languagedynamicsgroup.com/products/story-champs/. • Story Friends: https://brookespublishing.com/product/story-friends/. • World of Words: http://www.nyuwow.org/
  85. 85. Acknowledgements We would like to thank: ⊡ the Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) at Prairie Children Preschool (PCP) of the Indian Prairie School District (IPSD) 204 (Aurora, IL) who graciously participated in the videotaping and the administration and staff of IPSD who supported this effort. ⊡ The Infinitec and Center for Professional Studies, Towson University, who assisted with the technical aspects of the videotape post-production process. ⊡ Colleagues from the Center for Response to Intervention who spearheaded the development of measures and intervention that have laid the groundwork for MTSS in early education. ⊡ Funding from the National Center for Special Education Research that provided funding for research on Response to Intervention in Early Childhood.
  86. 86. GIVEAWAY We’re giving away three free copies of Multi-Tiered Systems of Support for Young Children! •Three attendees will be selected at random & announced after the Q&A. Stay active in the chat to increase your chances!
  87. 87. Q&A Session Save 20% at brookespublishing.com* Use code: EDWEBCM Expires 3/31/19 Questions? brookeswebmeeting@brookespublishing.com *Not to be combined with any other discounts or offers. Consumer orders only, please. Excludes BOL training, pre-discounted bundles, and online products such as ASQ Online and AEPSinteractive™.
  88. 88. Thank you to our presenters! Learn more about Brookes Publishing at www.brookespublishing.com Give us your feedback on this edWebinar! Click on this link in the chat: tinyurl.com/edWebinarEval Judith Carta, Ph.D. University of Kansas Email: carta@ku.edu Robin Miller Young, Ed.D., NCSP Northern Illinois University Email: robinmilleryoung@gmail.com
  89. 89. Get your CE Certificate for this edWebinar Your personalized CE certificate will be posted to your edWebinar transcript by the end of the next business day. Join at: www.edweb.net/ inclusiveeducation Join the community and go to the edWebinar archives for the recording, slides, chat log, and any resources after this edWebinar.
  90. 90. ✓ Invitations to upcoming webinars ✓ Webinar recordings and resources ✓ CE quizzes ✓ Online discussions www.edweb.net/inclusiveeducation You’ll receive the following benefits: Join our free community! Teaching All Students To join, go to:

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