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Strengthening the
Sustainable Development Goals with
Open Access and Open Science
Challenges and Opportunities
Webinar in ...
Agenda
• Personal background and conceptual
approaches to Open Access and Open Science
• SDGs, the good and the bad
• Spec...
http://www.bioline.org.br
http://www.bioline.org.br
Centre
Could Open Access change the current
power structure of global scientific
production and dissemination?
Periphery
P...
Openness as a means to
development
What is the nature of “openness” and
its linkage to innovations for public
goods and ho...
Meanings of Openness
• Free of cost barriers
• Free of permission barriers
• Free to share and re-use
• Rights to Research...
“The right to science envisages the
scientific and technological
endeavor as a process that every
person is entitled to pa...
Open and Collaborative Science
in Development Network
Funding:
Coordination
http://www.ocsdnet.org
@ocsdnet
A proposition that open
models and peer-based
production, enabled by
pervasive network
technologies, non-market
based ince...
This call for:
• Diverse empirical research on “openness” across
disciplinary boundaries
• Development of rich conceptual ...
Open Science as Inclusive Science
• Could OCS thinking and practices lead to a
more inclusive view of knowledge production...
• The network is supporting 12 sub-projects with
researchers from 15 countries
• 3 projects from Sub-Saharan Africa, 1 fro...
Open
Science
Doing Science
Openly
& Collaboratively
Open Data
Open Access
Overarching Framework:
Governance and Sustainabi...
The Sustainable Development Goals
http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/ng-
interactive/2015/jan/19/sustainable-development-goals-changing-world-17-
Build resilient
infrastructure,
promote inclusive and
sustainable
industrialisation and
foster innovation
End poverty
in a...
Build resilient
infrastructure,
promote inclusive and
sustainable
industrialisation and
foster innovation
End poverty
in a...
The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA)
The World of Scientific Output According to Thomson’s ISI
Science Citation Index
Data from 2002
http://www.worldmapper.org...
The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA)
How much of the
research output
from Africa are
relev...
The need to build robust
and scalable Knowledge
Infrastructures to support
open research practices and
data sharing
“Knowledge infrastructures are complex
ecologies, adapting continuously to local and
global conditions and to changes in t...
National
governments must
commit to
supporting science
and development
locally
PLOS Biology | DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002204 July 23, 2015
If effective steps to secure the permanence of e-infrastruct...
Centre
What kind of Knowledge
Infrastructures do we need to
support truly universal Open
Science?
Periphery
Periphery
Glob...
Open
Science
Doing Science
Openly
& Collaboratively
Open Data
Open Access
Overarching Framework:
Governance and Sustainabi...
Thank you!
Chan@utsc.utoronto.ca
@lesliekwchan
http://www.ocsdnet.org
Challenges and opportunities of linking Open Access and Open Science with the Sustainable Development Goals
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Challenges and opportunities of linking Open Access and Open Science with the Sustainable Development Goals

The SDGs represent challenges in advancing the broad access to information agenda because of the divergent goals and proliferating targets and indicators. At the same time, the broadness of many of the goals presents opportunities for the agenda, particularly in the form of open access and open science, to embed itself at the core, thus allowing concrete actions and policies to be formulated in order to achieve tangible development outcomes. I will focus in particular on Goal 9 (“Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation”) and argue that information and knowledge are essential infrastructure needed to build local research capacity which are in turn the foundation for sustainable development. The growing understanding of the importance of sharing methods and results throughout the research life cycle further demands the need for appropriate infrastructure. Examples of such infrastructure, such as data and publication repositories, already exist at some local level, but they are often fragmented and lack adequate resources. It is therefore important for FAO/IFLA/COAR to continue to advocate for the development of knowledge infrastructure and to ensure that policies are in place to support their long term sustainability.

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Challenges and opportunities of linking Open Access and Open Science with the Sustainable Development Goals

  1. 1. Strengthening the Sustainable Development Goals with Open Access and Open Science Challenges and Opportunities Webinar in conjunction with the e-forum on "Sustainable Development Goals: The Impact of Access to Information on our Societies". Sept. 15, 2015 Leslie Chan University of Toronto Scarborough
  2. 2. Agenda • Personal background and conceptual approaches to Open Access and Open Science • SDGs, the good and the bad • Specific links between the SDGs and Open Science and Open Access • Policy considerations
  3. 3. http://www.bioline.org.br
  4. 4. http://www.bioline.org.br
  5. 5. Centre Could Open Access change the current power structure of global scientific production and dissemination? Periphery Periphery open access creates the potential for new spaces for collaboration and co-creation of knowledge
  6. 6. Openness as a means to development What is the nature of “openness” and its linkage to innovations for public goods and how can this understanding help formulate and support enabling policies?
  7. 7. Meanings of Openness • Free of cost barriers • Free of permission barriers • Free to share and re-use • Rights to Research, meaning the rights to participate in knowledge production and meaning making • Inclusive Participation (beyond expertise) • Equitable Collaboration • Promote Cognitive justice
  8. 8. “The right to science envisages the scientific and technological endeavor as a process that every person is entitled to participate in— a collective and collaborative process that can help to unite a frequently fragmented world.” Lea Shaver, The Right to Science and Culture. 2010 WISC. L. REV. 121 (2010)
  9. 9. Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network Funding: Coordination http://www.ocsdnet.org @ocsdnet
  10. 10. A proposition that open models and peer-based production, enabled by pervasive network technologies, non-market based incentive structures and alternative licensing regimes, could result in greater participation, access and collaboration across different social and economic sectors.
  11. 11. This call for: • Diverse empirical research on “openness” across disciplinary boundaries • Development of rich conceptual frameworks that acknowledge the diversity of knowledge production, forms of representations, and legitimation • Understanding principles of technical and social interoperability and the supporting institutional structures • Rethinking on funding support and incentive structures • Policy Alignment between funders and development organizations
  12. 12. Open Science as Inclusive Science • Could OCS thinking and practices lead to a more inclusive view of knowledge production and legitimation? • What kind of tools, standards, infrastructure, institutions and policies would need to be created or adapted to enable OCS and equal participation of researchers from marginalized regions?
  13. 13. • The network is supporting 12 sub-projects with researchers from 15 countries • 3 projects from Sub-Saharan Africa, 1 from the Middle East, 1 from the Caribbean, 4 from Latin America, and 3 from South, East and Central Asia • Diverse topics: citizen science, open hardware, open data, IP policy, climate change, food security, public health, indigenous knowledge, sociology of science…
  14. 14. Open Science Doing Science Openly & Collaboratively Open Data Open Access Overarching Framework: Governance and Sustainability ? Practice Principles Policy Knowledge as a Public Good Knowing Differently Inclusion Innovation Funding Infrastructure Intellectual Property Incentive Rights to Research for Social Justice
  15. 15. The Sustainable Development Goals
  16. 16. http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/ng- interactive/2015/jan/19/sustainable-development-goals-changing-world-17-
  17. 17. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation End poverty in all its forms everywhere Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  18. 18. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation End poverty in all its forms everywhere Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels Knowledge Infrastructure Knowledge Poverty Cognitive Justice and Rights to Research
  19. 19. The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA)
  20. 20. The World of Scientific Output According to Thomson’s ISI Science Citation Index Data from 2002 http://www.worldmapper.org/display.php?selected=205
  21. 21. The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA) How much of the research output from Africa are relevant to the problems faced by Africans?
  22. 22. The need to build robust and scalable Knowledge Infrastructures to support open research practices and data sharing
  23. 23. “Knowledge infrastructures are complex ecologies, adapting continuously to local and global conditions and to changes in technology, policy, and stakeholders” Borgman, C. L., Darch, P. T., Sands, A. E., Pasquetto, I. V., Golshan, M. S., Wallis, J. C., & Traweek, S. (2015). Knowledge infrastructures in science: data, diversity, and digital libraries. International Journal on Digital Libraries, 16(3-4), 207–227. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00799-015-0157-z
  24. 24. National governments must commit to supporting science and development locally
  25. 25. PLOS Biology | DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002204 July 23, 2015 If effective steps to secure the permanence of e-infrastructures are not taken soon, we will risk having biological data, which are currently organized and made available globally, once again inaccessible. In the case of Brazil, speciesLink is in immediate peril of disappearing. Brazil is one of the most diverse countries in the planet [18], holding ~19% of all existing plant species [19]; thus, speciesLink is not only of interest to Brazilian people and government anymore but has acquired importance in the global scenario as well. Not only will the hundreds of thousands of users of this system miss this crucial research and policy infrastructure, but the social scientific network linked to the e-infrastructure may lose strength.
  26. 26. Centre What kind of Knowledge Infrastructures do we need to support truly universal Open Science? Periphery Periphery Global Knowledge Commons Walled Garden
  27. 27. Open Science Doing Science Openly & Collaboratively Open Data Open Access Overarching Framework: Governance and Sustainability ? Practice Principles Policy Knowledge as a Public Good Knowing Differently Inclusion Innovation Funding Infrastructure Intellectual Property Incentive Rights to Research for Social Justice
  28. 28. Thank you! Chan@utsc.utoronto.ca @lesliekwchan http://www.ocsdnet.org

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