What do we know
about resilience
and food
security?
Most recent
progress in
measuring and
assessing
resilience
interventio...
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
Background
- Social Protection –climate change
and disaster (DFID-Word Bank...
 several disciplines [from
psychology to engineering]
 more than 100 definitions
 “not cast in stone” – evolved over
ti...
Generalities and complications about resilience
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 19...
Resilience used as…
 a goal (what to aim at)
 an analytical tool (to understand)
 an conceptual tool (to find the
solut...
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
 Resilience is about people (individual, households, communities) and syst...
‘Operational’ definition of resilience
“capacity to handle appropriately*
shocks and stressors”
* = without LT negative im...
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
Resilience as a set of capacities
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
Beyond the direct impact of shocks…
… implications for
measuring/monitoring resilience
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
 Household characterist...
ResponseShock
Project / intervention
M&E of project input / activities / outputs
endline
- hh charac
- resil capac
- conte...
 Economic wealth is key
Financial capital (income, assets)
are important for recovery
 Social capital as a critical
elem...
Results : a brief overview…
 Economic wealth is key
 Wealth (assets) does influence the recovery
process but not the cho...
Results : a brief overview…
Measuring resilience in practice
 Social capital as a critical element of resilience
 Eviden...
Results : a brief overview…
 Perception matters
 Higher subjective resilience associated with a lower
propensity to enga...
Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
pastPsycho-social factors
aspiration, risk aversion,
self-efficacy, etc.
Su...
 Objective and subjective
 Specific, yet generic/coherent
 Emphasis on shocks and
stressors
 Resilience as a combinati...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

What do we know about resilience and food security? – Most recent progress in measuring and assessing resilience interventions

493 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Speaker: Christophe Béné, Decision and Policy Analysis research area DAPA-CIAT, (Colombia)

As resilience programming gains more and more prominence as an approach for addressing chronic vulnerability of populations exposed to recurrent shocks and stressors, empirical evidence will be needed for measuring how well households, communities, and systems manage shocks and stressors, and how interventions and programmes that are designed to strengthen these capacities perform. Despite progress on the conceptual side, academics, practitioners, and donors are still struggling with pragmatic issues - in particular, how to measure, and monitor and evaluate resilience interventions. The objective of this presentation is to review some of the progress made recently in relation to measurement and M&E of resilience using some empirical case studies.

Publicado en: Ciencias
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

What do we know about resilience and food security? – Most recent progress in measuring and assessing resilience interventions

  1. 1. What do we know about resilience and food security? Most recent progress in measuring and assessing resilience interventions
  2. 2. Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions Background - Social Protection –climate change and disaster (DFID-Word Bank) - Resilience Measurement Technical Working groups (WFP-FAO) - IFPRI Hunger Index - Food for Peace (USAID) - WFP (Bangladesh) - Review the current state-of-the art - Conceptual-theoretical - Measurement - Impact evaluation - Some empirical examples - Focus on Food security (at the household level) Objectives
  3. 3.  several disciplines [from psychology to engineering]  more than 100 definitions  “not cast in stone” – evolved over time [1940s – til present]  several functions of resilience Generalities and complications about resilience Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
  4. 4. Generalities and complications about resilience Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 (resilire) resilience Child resilience (psychology) Ecosystem resilience (ecology) Material resilience (engineering) Social-ecological resilience Social resilience Climate change resilience disaster risk reduction19th century Modulus of resilience RobertMallet Evolutionary path of the concept of resilience and emergence of the different schools of thoughts and their lineage Source: Béné et al 2014
  5. 5. Resilience used as…  a goal (what to aim at)  an analytical tool (to understand)  an conceptual tool (to find the solution)  a metaphor (to help break silo)  a buzz-word (to publish or to get funded?)  an indicator (of sustainability) Resilience defined as…  a clear (academic) concept (relying on theory)  a common meaning word (“ability to bear hardship”)  no definition  no use beyond the title! Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions Generalities and complications about resilience
  6. 6. Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions  Resilience is about people (individual, households, communities) and systems  Resilience is about shock and stressors  Resilience is about the way these people / systems respond to shocks and stressors ability of a system and its component parts to anticipate, absorb, accommodate, or recover from the effects of a hazardous event in a timely and efficient manner IPCC 2012 ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate to and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner UNISDR 2013 ability of countries, communities and households to manage change, by maintaining or transforming living standards in the face of shocks or stresses without compromising their long-term prospects DFID 2012 capacity that ensures adverse stressors and shocks do not have long- lasting adverse development consequences TWG FAO-WFP 2014  Resilience is about the ability of people/ systems to respond to shocks/stressors  Normative value of resilience – resilience is a ‘good’ thing
  7. 7. ‘Operational’ definition of resilience “capacity to handle appropriately* shocks and stressors” * = without LT negative implications Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions The main lessons from the last few years….  Resilience as a set of capacities  Beyond the direct impact of shocks…  Resilience as a mean (outcome) rather than an end (impact) Implications for measuring resilience
  8. 8. Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions Resilience as a set of capacities
  9. 9. Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions Beyond the direct impact of shocks…
  10. 10. … implications for measuring/monitoring resilience Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions  Household characteristics (assets, livelihood activity, access to information, age, gender, etc.  Resilience capacities at the hh and community levels (infrastructure, social capitals, external support, etc.)  Shocks/stressors and their characteristics (severity, frequency, etc.)  Households’ responses (coping strategies, adaptive strategies, transformative strategies)  Household welfare and wellbeing indicators (z-score, quality of life indicators, food security) Panel data High frequency data CHANGE Intermediate outcome Outcome Impact
  11. 11. ResponseShock Project / intervention M&E of project input / activities / outputs endline - hh charac - resil capac - contextHigh frequency panel - shock/stressor - responses - Δ in hh wellbeing The Ferrari model… Baseline - hh charac - resil capac - context Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
  12. 12.  Economic wealth is key Financial capital (income, assets) are important for recovery  Social capital as a critical element of resilience Reciprocity, collective action, etc. usually expected to strengthen resilience  Perception matters People’s decisions (e.g. type of response) depend on perception and subjective factors (e.g. self- esteem, self-confidence, etc.) Determinants of resilience capacities? Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions Empirical research (Ghana, Fiji, Sri Lanka, Vietnam) Series of working hypotheses
  13. 13. Results : a brief overview…  Economic wealth is key  Wealth (assets) does influence the recovery process but not the choice of responses 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Food Expenses Money Assest Support Collaboration Diversification Migration Exit Change Increase Percentageofhouseholds(%) Response typology (Vietnam) Bottom 40% Top 40% 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Food Expenses Money Assets Support Collaboration Diversification Migration Exit Change Increase Percentageofhouseholds(%) Response typology (Fiji) Bottom 40% Top 40% Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
  14. 14. Results : a brief overview… Measuring resilience in practice  Social capital as a critical element of resilience  Evidence about social capital is mixed / unclear  no significant correlation between social capital and resilience at the hh level  strong positive correlation between social capital indicators and resilience at the community level
  15. 15. Results : a brief overview…  Perception matters  Higher subjective resilience associated with a lower propensity to engage in coping strategies  The perception that people have of their level of control over their own life positively influences their ability to recover from shocks/stressors  higher subjective resilience also more likely to engage in adaptive/transformative strategies Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions
  16. 16. Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions pastPsycho-social factors aspiration, risk aversion, self-efficacy, etc. Subjective resilience Household and community characteristics age, education, assets, infrastructures, social capital, etc. Programme interventions livelihood diversification, climate smart agriculture etc. Resilience capacities absorptive, adaptive, transformative Effect of shocks/stressors Responses coping, adaptive, transformative Impact Change in food security, nutrition status, wellbeing current - objective/tangible component = assets, social capital, knowledge, access to infrastructure, etc. - subjective component = self- perception, risk aversion, risk perception, self-efficacy, etc. Two components of resilience
  17. 17.  Objective and subjective  Specific, yet generic/coherent  Emphasis on shocks and stressors  Resilience as a combination of capacities  Combined effects of shocks/stressors and the responses  Resilience capacity is measured at multiple levels and scales  Resilience as a means (outcome) rather than an end (impact) Series of “principles” Measuring, and M&E of Resilience interventions

×