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Econsultancy State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific

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Econsultancy State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific

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Econsultancy State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific

  1. 1. Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files / Trends & Innovation State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific In association with Datalicious
  2. 2. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Econsultancy London 4th Floor, Wells Point 79 Wells Street London W1T 3QN United Kingdom Telephone: +44 207 269 1450 http://econsultancy.com help@econsultancy.com Econsultancy New York 350 7th Avenue, Suite 307 New York, NY 10001 United States Telephone: +1 212 971 0630 Econsultancy Singapore 20 Collyer Quay #23-01 Singapore 049319 Telephone: +65 6653 1911 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Published September 2015
  3. 3. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Contents 1. Executive Summary .........................................................4 1.1. Methodology................................................................................ 5 1.2. About Econsultancy .................................................................... 6 2. Foreword by Datalicious.................................................. 7 2.1. About Datalicious........................................................................ 8 3. Marketing Attribution Beyond the Last Click .................9 4. Goals and Benefits of Attribution.................................. 12 5. Types of Attribution....................................................... 15 6. Types of Technology and Vendors................................. 19 7. Actionable Attribution...................................................25 8. Multichannel Attribution...............................................29 9. Barriers to Success......................................................... 31 10. Appendix: Respondent Profiles.....................................34
  4. 4. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 4 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 1. Executive Summary This State of Marketing Attribution report, produced by Econsultancy in partnership with Datalicious, is based on a survey of more than 400 client-side and agency marketers based in the Asia Pacific region. The key findings of the report are outlined below: Lack of knowledge holds back marketers Though marketers in the APAC region recognise the opportunity behind attribution, this is not translating into action for many. Though multi-device behaviour has increased the focus on attribution in the opinion of 71% of companies, this research has found that two-thirds of company respondents (66%) do not carry out any form of marketing attribution beyond basic ‘last-click’ analysis. Lack of knowledge appears to be the biggest issue preventing both companies and the clients of agencies from implementing an attribution model but, promisingly, there does seem to be little resistance to implementing attribution modelling with only 16% of company respondents saying they were not convinced by the business case. Custom modelling is the most effective attribution model, though most are still using first and last click Attribution capabilities have significantly improved since the days of last click. As marketers try to track the entire customer journey and assess the influence of multiple devices and channels, basic attribution models have become less relevant as they fail to take into account the complexity of journeys or the amount of data available. Despite this, first touch or click remains the most commonly-used model beyond last-click, used by 47% of companies who carry out some kind of marketing attribution modelling beyond last-click. However, this research is encouraging in that custom modelling is shown to be the most popular method after first and last-click, used by 39% and 49% of companies and agency clients respectively. This form of modelling is viewed as significantly more effective than other models: 41% said it was very effective compared to 15% that said the same of first touch or click. Turning attribution insights into action is the final hurdle Though the argument for attribution is won, and the value of it recognised by marketers, this report shows that 44% of companies agree to some extent that the insights they gain from attribution are not ‘actioned’. Actioning insights is the third biggest barrier to effective attribution according to survey respondents, with other challenges relating to disparate tech/data and data complexity most likely compounding the problem. Further findings The importance of customer experience has helped the case for attribution; the research also found that over two-thirds of client-side marketers see insights into consumer and customer behaviour as a major benefit of marketing attribution. For those implementing attribution, the most likely primary impact was an increase in spend on certain digital channels, noted particularly by agencies talking about their clients. Despite positivity around the complexity of models used, the research also found that nearly half of organisations surveyed still carry out attribution manually or using spreadsheets. Just over half of companies carrying attribution do so on a multichannel basis; the offline channels most likely to be included are direct mail and printed media.
  5. 5. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 5 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 1.1. Methodology This is Econsultancy’s first State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific report, carried out in association with Datalicious. There were over 400 respondents to our research request, which took the form of an online survey during May and June 2015. Respondents included both client-side professionals (including marketers and ecommerce professionals) and supply-side respondents (including agencies and consultants). Information about the survey, including the link, was emailed to Econsultancy’s and Datalicious’ respective user bases and promoted on Twitter and other social channels. The incentive for taking part was access to a complimentary copy of this report just before its publication on the Econsultancy website. The findings are shown for client-side (i.e. ‘company respondents’) and supply-side (or ‘agency respondents’) separately. For a more detailed profiling of respondents, see Section 10. If you have any questions about the research, please email Econsultancy’s Research Director, Linus Gregoriadis (Linus@econsultancy.com). Figure 1: Which of the following most accurately describes your job role? Respondents: 422
  6. 6. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 1.2. About Econsultancy Econsultancy’s mission is to help its customers achieve excellence in digital business, marketing and ecommerce through research, training and events. Founded in 1999, Econsultancy has offices in New York, London and Singapore. Econsultancy is used by over 600,000 professionals every month. Subscribers get access to research, market data, best practice guides, case studies and elearning – all focused on helping individuals and enterprises get better at digital. The subscription is supported by digital transformation services including digital capability programmes, training courses, skills assessments and audits. We train and develop thousands of professionals each year as well as running events and networking that bring the Econsultancy community together around the world. Subscribe to Econsultancy today to accelerate your journey to digital excellence. Call us to find out more: New York: +1 212 971 0630 London: +44 207 269 1450 Singapore: +65 6653 1911
  7. 7. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 2. Foreword by Datalicious Most marketers recognise the benefits of doing media attribution beyond the last-click, right? Surprisingly, no, or at least, they do but are incapable of action. That’s one of the key insights to come from this report, which finds that over 60% of marketers in APAC do not carry out any form of attribution, despite a clear majority recognising its importance. While it’s promising to see that the growth in cross-device, cross-channel campaigns has increased an awareness for media attribution, it would seem there’s still some way to go in filling knowledge gaps around the subject. The benefits of media attribution are clear: it allows marketers to optimise media channel mix, justify media spend and end media wastage. Wastage in media spend has a multiplying effect on marketing performance—not only is it a measurement of inefficiency but also a grave representation of missed opportunities. And that’s not just reflecting on missed impression opportunities, but extends to conversion optimisation. Without a true understanding of media performance across channels, it is impossible to allocate media spend to better performing channels. This report also shows that custom media attribution is the most effective attribution model, especially when compared to first or last click attribution. If you’re still using first or last click models then your marketing team really needs to take a good look at the reasons why. And finally, there’s still a high amount of marketers that aren’t actioning insights, and there are plenty of practical reasons why this may be—it requires creative and media agency cooperation which can’t always be guaranteed and it usually requires buy-in from the entire CMO department. It’s not an easy process to navigate but as a general industry comment, we are seeing more awareness among media agencies of the value of actioning attribution insights, so the future looks very promising. From the team at Datalicious, we hope that the information in this report gives you greater insights into how marketers across APAC are responding to challenges of multichannel and cross- device campaign optimisation and how you can apply these learnings to your own media attribution journey. Special thanks must go to Linus Gregoriadis and his team of analysts at Econsultancy for putting this significant research together. Christian Bartens CEO & Founder Datalicious
  8. 8. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 8 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 2.1. About Datalicious Founded in 2007, Datalicious is a global full-service media attribution and marketing analytics provider. Since its beginnings as an Australian analytics consultancy, Datalicious has expanded internationally through its growing product development and consulting services divisions. The Datalicious OptimaHub is an innovative media attribution platform that uses the latest technologies to track consumer purchase paths across channels and devices for maximum accuracy, whilst providing enterprise grade flexibility and customisation. Datalicious’ professional services are included in all OptimaHub attribution packages to ensure clients are adequately supported at each stage of their project and to help maximise the value they get from their technology investment. Datalicious technology drives the attribution capabilities for some of APAC’s largest and most innovative brands so please contact us for a selection of case studies on how other market leaders are using media attribution to supercharge their marketing efforts. For more information visit www.datalicious.com or email: sydney@datalicious.com melbourne@datalicious.com auckland@datalicious.com singapore@datalicious.com mumbai@datalicious.com manila@datalicious.com Datalicious is part of the Veda Group.
  9. 9. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 3. Marketing Attribution Beyond the Last Click As the number of consumer touchpoints and digital screens have proliferated, it has become more difficult for marketers to ascertain at what point consumers are influenced to purchase. Marketing attribution used to be a simpler affair, with many pointing to the last click as the point at which interest turned into a buying decision. With mobile devices giving customers multiple screens to buy, share or consume on, that point has become less clear. It’s no longer about identifying the last click, but about tracking, as accurately as possible, an entire customer journey to discover what channels are actually having a direct impact on the purchase decision. With this data to hand, attribution becomes much more than just the last click, marketers can apportion credit to individual touchpoints and optimise accordingly, which in turn can lead to more efficient allocation of budgets and significant improvements in the customer journey. Econsultancy defines marketing attribution as “the practice of allocating value to the different touchpoints / channels that have influenced a sale or another desired outcome.” In this survey, respondents were asked to discount the use of default last click attribution models whereby 100% credit is given to the touchpoint or channel giving the last click before conversion. Insightful attribution can lead to tangible improvements, as investment in poorly performing channels can be reduced and better performing channels can be optimised. Despite the opportunity around attribution, many marketers in the Asia Pacific region are still missing out. Figure 2 illustrates that two-thirds (66%) of company respondents do not carry out attribution modelling, but over half (56%) are ‘thinking about it’. Figure 2: Do you or your clients carry out any type of media attribution modelling to measure the effectiveness of your/their marketing? Company respondents: 185 Agency respondents: 188
  10. 10. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 10 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 For those planning to carry out attribution modelling, some of the latest marketing trends might have contributed to their decision to invest in this area. Although there’s still some debate around what ‘big data’ actually entails or refers to, this term can be used to describe the vast amount of data generated by customer actions. With such a large volume of information to sift through and understand, it is wise for marketers to invest in processes that ensure the data becomes insightful; marketing attribution is one such process. Figure 3 shows that for nearly three in five (58%) organisations, the rise of big data has ‘increased focus on attribution’. Agencies are 33% more likely to point to big data as driving their clients’ interest in this area, with over three-quarters (77%) of respondents saying that’s the case. Figure 3: ‘The rise of big data has increased focus on attribution’ Company respondents: 45 Agency respondents: 56 As noted before, the number of screens a customer moves between has also increased the need for attribution. Figure 4 on the next page shows a broad agreement between company and agency respondents, with 71% and 84% respectively agreeing that ‘multi-device behaviour has increased focus on attribution’. As seen in Figure 5, also overleaf, the issues which restrict marketers’ ability to carry out attribution or implement it properly are mainly around a lack of knowledge, lack of time and technology limitations. Lack of knowledge was identified as the primary concern by both company and agency respondents. On a positive note, there does seem to be little resistance to implementing attribution modelling, with only 16% of company respondents saying they were not convinced about the business case, and 15% citing internal politics. This suggests that there is plenty of appetite for implementing attribution but more work needs to be done to equip teams with the skills necessary to make the most of the tools available.
  11. 11. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Figure 4: ‘Multi-device behaviour has increased focus on attribution’ Company respondents: 45 Agency respondents: 56 Figure 5: What are the reasons you or your clients don’t carry out marketing attribution or have delayed its implementation? Company respondents: 122 Agency respondents: 112
  12. 12. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 12 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 4. Goals and Benefits of Attribution Company and agency respondents point to similar goals for marketing attribution, with slight differences between the two groups, as seen in the charts below. Over two-thirds of responding organisations cite optimising media mix (70%) and building understanding of customer journey / sales cycle (67%) as high-priority goals. This is a positive sign that marketers understand the opportunity afforded by attribution to provide a better customer experience. It is also encouraging to see that marketers aim to do more than just justify their digital spend; they’re using marketing attribution to optimise the media mix and improve performance. Company respondents Figure 6: What are your main goals for marketing attribution? Respondents: 53
  13. 13. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Agency respondents Figure 7: What are your clients’ main goals for marketing attribution? Respondents: 69 Figure 8 shows that the perceived benefits of marketing attribution match up with marketers’ goals. Nearly four in five (79%) organisations cite budget allocation as a primary benefit, closely followed by a better understanding of the interaction between channels. It’s worth noting that over two-thirds (71%) of company respondents cite insights into consumer and customer behaviour as a benefit of marketing attribution, demonstrating that marketers are increasingly aware of how critical customer experience is. It is also encouraging to see that marketers are seeking to have a better understanding of how digital and physical interactions complement each other and fit into attribution models. Figure 9 shows that just over half (52%) of company respondents agree that ‘the ROI from attribution investment is clear’. While a large proportion claim to effectively measure the impact of attribution, this does leave 48% of respondents either in disagreement or having no opinion on the statement – this is a particularly important issue for attribution vendors to overcome and demonstrate the efficacy of attribution modelling.
  14. 14. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 14 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Figure 8: What do you/your clients regard as the benefits of marketing attribution? Company respondents: 175 Agency respondents: 177 Company respondents Figure 9: ‘The ROI from attribution investment is clear’ Respondents: 44
  15. 15. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 15 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 5. Types of Attribution As the diversity of channels, devices and touchpoints has increased over the last few years, the challenge of attribution has become more complex. Along with this diversity has come the era of big data, allowing a level of customer journey analytics not previously seen. The application of big data into attribution models has developed the range of methods used by companies. Despite this, Figure 10 shows that first touch or click, which many would class as a basic form of attribution, remains the most commonly-used model beyond last-click according to both companies and agency respondents (47% and 50% respectively). Encouragingly, second to this is custom modelling, used by 39% of companies, and a higher 49% of agency clients. Custom attribution modelling uses one or more standard models as the starting point, and then layers in other factors unique to a business to produce a custom model. Though complex to set up and monitor, the method produces the most relevant model for every business, ultimately increasing accuracy. The 26% higher use of custom modelling by the clients of agencies indicates the expertise of the latter when it comes to attribution technologies and methodologies. Concerns are regularly expressed about media agencies owning attribution, in that there is a danger of them ‘marking their own homework’. However, agencies certainly have the experience and internal skills to make the most of their clients’ big data, using more complex models than perhaps companies are able to in-house. Even allocation (linear) attribution, where each touchpoint along a journey to purchase is given equal value, is the least-commonly used method, with just over a fifth (21%) of companies selecting it. Figure 10: Beyond last click, what methods do you/your clients use for marketing attribution? Company respondents: 54 Agency respondents: 68 Note: This question was conditional on carrying out media attribution modelling beyond the last click.
  16. 16. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 16 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 The increased accuracy of custom modelling is reflected in Figure 11, which clearly shows the augmented effectiveness of the method, with 41% of companies rating their custom attribution model as ‘very effective’, and a further 41% rating it as ‘somewhat effective’. In comparison, even allocation (linear) was rated as ‘very effective’ by none of those surveyed, and as ‘somewhat ineffective’ by more than a quarter (27%). Agencies rate even allocation as slightly more effective than the client-side, with 71% rating the method as ‘somewhat’ or ‘very’ effective. However, custom modelling is again viewed as the most effective method, with almost half (49%) of agencies saying their clients rate it as ‘very effective’. Company respondents Figure 11: How would you rate the effectiveness of your attribution method? Respondents: 26 Survey respondents were asked in an open question if any attribution type or approach has proved particularly effective, producing a mix of opinions (box overleaf). Some are sticking with simple, click-based approaches, either because they are just starting out using attribution models, or because they don’t have the internal resources to progress to a more complex model. Others were evidently further ahead with their attribution modelling, using custom modelling to optimise marketing budgets across both publishers and channels.
  17. 17. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 17 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Agency respondents Figure 12: How would your clients rate the effectiveness of their attribution methods? Respondents: 35 Is there any type of attribution or approach that has proved to be particularly effective? “Ultimately there is little data to support the benefit of one model over any other...” “At the moment everything is based on clicks and online only. We need better insights of impressions, offline and cross-channel conversion metrics.” “Using media mix modelling to set budgets, then optimising within digital channels rather than trying to de-dupe across channels. This makes for a simpler view of each channel that is more actionable. Display learnings can be used to allocate budget across publishers. Digital channel learnings can be used to allocate budget across channels. But the budget itself is set by whole-of-marketing, top-down attribution.” “Custom weightings dependent on the channel.” “For clients, the very simple approach (‘don’t try to bite off too much’) to attribution is the most effective at the moment.” “Focusing on personal contact rather than points-based systems limited to website touchpoints.” “First interaction approach is taken for platforms like Facebook, where the Indian consumers are not comfortable enough to buy, but to be made aware of the brand message.” “We have a bespoke algorithmic approach that has been proven to deliver better results.” Survey respondents
  18. 18. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 18 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 The complexity of attribution modelling is reflected in Figure 13, which shows that 64% of respondents agree that a perfect attribution model is impossible to achieve. The attribution trends briefing based on this year’s Digital Cream event1 discussed the reputation that attribution has gained as being ‘divorced from reality’, stating: “Sometimes there is scepticism about the amount of arbitrary rules in place, which means that errors can be introduced into the modelling. It’s often seen as just one version of the truth within companies; the definitive view of the world. However, it’s a mistake for companies to try to build the perfect model as ‘perfect is the enemy of good’.” The vast majority of experts believe that attribution is not a perfect science and it can’t solve every question a marketer has about their campaign mix. However, they do help marketers to evaluate the influence of different channels on each other, and the comparative impact of each on conversion rates. Company respondents Figure 13: ‘A perfect attribution model is impossible’ Respondents: 46 1 https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-attribution-trends-briefing-digital-cream-london-2015/
  19. 19. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 19 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 6. Types of Technology and Vendors Although attribution modelling often tops marketers’ wishlists and many vendors have added sophisticated functionality to their technology platforms, nearly half (48%) of organisations surveyed still carry out attribution manually or using spreadsheets. Further analysis revealed that larger organisations (earning more than $50 million each year) are significantly more likely to carry out marketing attribution using vendor or custom-built technology compared to their smaller counterparts (75% versus 25% in the case of custom-built technology). Unsurprisingly, agency respondents are more than twice as likely to report that their clients use a media agency for their marketing attribution programmes. Figure 14: How do you or your clients carry out marketing attribution? Company respondents: 54 Agency respondents: 64 In terms of types of technology, Figure 15 shows there’s an even split between those who use ad serving technology to carry out marketing attribution and those who enlist the services of an agency or consultancy. Less than a fifth (17%) use a pureplay attribution company. Figure 16 shows the types of technology that the clients of agencies typically use. As agencies have multiple clients, they could select multiple answers. Supply-side respondents also report that ad serving technology is the most popular route among their clients, with nearly two-thirds saying that’s the case. Nearly three in five (56%) point to paid search technology, whereas none of the companies surveyed indicated they use this technology to carry out marketing attribution.
  20. 20. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 20 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Company respondents Figure 15: What type of technology vendor do you use to carry out attribution? Respondents: 18 Agency respondents Figure 16: What type of technology vendor do your clients typically use to carry out attribution? Respondents: 25 Note: Respondents could select multiple options.
  21. 21. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 21 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 As seen in the chart below, organisations use a variety of vendors for marketing attribution. This not only shows that the market is still highly fragmented, but is also probably a reflection of market maturity. Google and Adobe command a sizeable portion of the market, with around half (50% and 44% respectively) of responding organisations saying they use them. Datalicious (31%) takes the third spot, while all other named platforms command much lower shares of the market. Table 1 and Table 2 on the next page shows this information cross-tabulated against the methods used attribution, for both client-side and agency respondents. Figure 17: Which vendor or vendors do you or your clients use for attribution? Company respondents: 16 Agency respondents: 25 Note: ClearSaleing is now known as eBay Enterprise Attribution.
  22. 22. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 22 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Table 1: Which vendor(s) do you use for attribution? (cross-tabulated by method of attribution) Adobe ClearSaleing Datalicious Ensighten Google IBM Kenshoo Marin Software Qubit VisualIQ Other First touch 36% 0% 14% 7% 36% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 7% Even allocation (linear) 20% 0% 10% 0% 40% 0% 10% 10% 0% 0% 10% Position-based / ‘Time decay’ 17% 0% 0% 0% 50% 0% 0% 17% 0% 0% 16% Custom modelling 17% 17% 25% 0% 25% 0% 0% 8% 0% 0% 8% View-through 31% 0% 8% 0% 31% 0% 0% 8% 0% 0% 22% Table 2: Which vendor(s) do your clients typically use for attribution? (cross-tabulated by method of attribution) Adobe ClearSaleing Datalicious Ensighten Google IBM Kenshoo Marin Software Qubit VisualIQ Other First touch 28% 0% 3% 6% 25% 6% 9% 3% 0% 3% 17% Even allocation (linear) 24% 0% 3% 7% 24% 0% 10% 7% 3% 3% 19% Position-based / ‘Time decay’ 24% 0% 4% 8% 24% 4% 12% 8% 4% 0% 12% Custom modelling 25% 0% 4% 4% 13% 0% 8% 8% 4% 4% 30% View-through 24% 0% 5% 10% 19% 5% 10% 5% 0% 5% 17% Note: ClearSaleing is now known as eBay Enterprise Attribution.
  23. 23. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 23 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 More often than not, siloed organisational structures and impermeable data walls don’t really support the kind of flexibility that is required to make the most of optimisation efforts in general, and attribution in particular. Flexibility is a key ingredient when it comes to undertaking a successful marketing attribution programme, not only in terms of organisational structures and degree of collaboration between teams, but also in terms how models are applied and customised. Encouragingly, nearly two in five (58%) marketers describe their attribution systems as ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ flexible, while only 12% describe themselves as ‘not flexible at all’ (Figure 18). This means that a large proportion are half-way there. However, as we’ll see in Section 9, disparate technology platforms still represent a deterrent in 41% of companies surveyed. There’s no doubt that when it comes to marketing attribution, flexibility and effectiveness are intertwined. Adopting a nimble approach means being able to action the insights uncovered by the attribution programme and make adjustments on a regular basis, which in turn leads to small successes. However, only half of those surveyed indicate that their technology ‘facilitates effective attribution models’ (Figure 19). Figure 18: Typically, how flexible are your/your clients’ attribution systems? Company respondents: 50 Agency respondents: 62
  24. 24. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 24 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Company respondents Figure 19: ‘Our marketing technology facilitates effective attribution models’ Respondents: 45
  25. 25. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 25 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 7. Actionable Attribution Numerous Econsultancy roundtables held around the world on this topic have found that delegates are generally in agreement about why they want to develop an attribution model: to justify investment, measure the impact of channels and optimise these channels accordingly. This optimisation, based on the insights gained from attribution modelling, is a stumbling block for some marketers. Figure 20 shows that 44% of companies agree to some extent that the insights they gain from attribution are not actioned. A recent Datalicious whitepaper2 found that ‘actioning’ multi-touch attribution insights improves overall return on advertising spend. The research stated: “While it is impossible to say exactly how much the study participants will be able to increase their performance by actioning the insights gained from this exercise, it is certain that the impact will be significant.” Respondents were asked if they had actioned any insights as a result of marketing attribution, and many of the answers focused on aiding the identification of value in specific channels and how channels interact with each other. Optimisation of budgets was mentioned numerous times as a significant change, particularly decreasing spend on ineffective channels. The latter is encouraging, indicating increased levels of trust in attribution modelling. Previous Econsultancy research has revealed anecdotal evidence of unwillingness among some marketing departments to embrace attribution, due to the risk of it reducing the budgets of certain channels. This fact can make it difficult to get buy-in from all parties, and without full support, insights can be hard to action. Company respondents Figure 20: ‘We don’t action the insights we get from attribution’ Respondents: 44 2 http://www.datalicious.com/media-attribution-optimising-digital-marketing-spend-in-financial- services/
  26. 26. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 26 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 What is the most significant change you’ve made as a result of marketing attribution? “Identifying ineffective spends. But still searching for effective spends.” “Being smarter about marketing spend.” “Optimising digital media mix.” “Decreased spend on certain channels. Dropped ATL media spends.” “The media agency who implemented the system will argue that media spend has been adjusted based on the marketing attribution results. However, the result is display is our most successful channel so we should put more budget into display. Coincidentally, advertising agencies make more money out of us if we put more money into display.” “Our clients are able to spend on channels that are most effective and approach differently to channels that are not as effective.” “Better visibility into the value of display and paid social advertising.” “Changing definition of leads generation due to user behaviour tracking.” “Determining a fairer and more accurate picture of channel effectiveness and value within the media mix.” “Gaining a much better insight into how channels work in synergy – moving clients away from being reliant on one or two channels only.” “Inputs: simply moving away from rule-based attribution to algorithmic / bespoke attribution. Outcomes: driving better conversion volume and efficiency.” “Reducing their wastage on digital channels that mostly don’t work and focus on channels that do work.” “Better optimisation of the digital budgets, leading to more investment as better ROI is achieved.” Survey respondents Figure 21 shows the impact of attribution on spending on digital marketing channels, revealing that the most likely impact is an increase on some, but not all, digital marketing channels. More than a tenth of companies said they had increased spending across all digital channels, however, only 3% of agencies agreed. Tellingly, almost a third of companies (30%) said that attribution had resulted in no change in digital marketing spending, compared to 15% of agencies who said the same about their clients. This is most likely an indication of the challenges that companies can face when actioning attribution insights internally, leading to a lack of change. In contrast, agencies can bring expert advice and clearer direction when it comes to altering budgets, with companies potentially more likely to make changes at the recommendation of, and with the support of their agency, compared to companies going it alone.
  27. 27. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 27 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Figure 21: What has been the primary impact of attribution on your / your clients’ spending? Company respondents: 47 Agency respondents: 59 Of those who have made budget increases as a result of their attribution model, 64% have made this increase in display advertising and 55% in paid search (Figure 22). There is a large disparity between the response of companies and agencies when it comes to paid search; 38% of agencies said their clients have increased paid search budgets. Another area where there is a larger discrepancy in response is video, where a much larger proportion of agency respondents (29%) said their clients have increased their budgets than companies themselves indicate (14%). We also included a survey question about which channels had seen a subsequent reduction in budget, but the sample size was unfortunately too small to include the chart.
  28. 28. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 28 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Figure 22: Which digital channels have seen an increase in budget as a result of attribution? Company respondents: 34 Agency respondents: 22
  29. 29. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 29 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 8. Multichannel Attribution Figure 23 below shows which digital channels companies in the Asia Pacific region are using as part of their marketing attribution. From the client-side perspective, in descending order, display advertising (76%), email (74%), SEO (70%) and paid search (69%) are the four channels most likely to be included in attribution modelling. Organic social media marketing (57%) and social media advertising (57%) are also factored in by more than half of responding companies. Figure 23: What digital channels are included as part of your or your clients’ marketing attribution? Company respondents: 54 Agency respondents: 64 It is a cause for concern if marketers are only including a limited number of channels in their attribution modelling, because it is important to get as complete a picture as possible. Recognising that offline touchpoints also need to be included to give a truly holistic perspective of how credit should be apportioned, marketers are increasingly asking questions about the contribution made by more traditional advertising channels such as print advertising, TV and direct mail. More than half of marketers (55%) say they are carrying out multichannel attribution, while 70% of supply-side respondents say their clients are doing this (Figure 24). Looking at the specific offline channels being included within attribution models (Figure 25), no single channel is being incorporated by more than half of companies doing multichannel attribution. Direct mail (41%), printed media (35%) and point of sale (33%) are the offline touchpoints most commonly being factored in. The problems around multiple data sources and technology platforms are discussed in the next section, and it is clear that these issues are exacerbated when digital and non-digital touchpoints are involved.
  30. 30. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 30 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Figure 24: Do you or your clients carry out any type of multichannel attribution (i.e. joining up online and offline)? Company respondents: 51 Agency respondents: 64 Figure 25: Which offline touchpoints are included in your / your clients’ attribution models? Company respondents: 51 Agency respondents: 61
  31. 31. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 31 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 9. Barriers to Success Along with opportunities, marketers are faced with a raft of challenges when trying to implement effective marketing attribution programmes. As seen in the chart below, the five main barriers are around technology, data and skills. Figure 26: What are the greatest barriers to using attribution more effectively? Company respondents: 49 Agency respondents: 63 Companies considering implementation or striving to accelerate the process of adoption should consider how well they perform in each of these areas and what they can do to address related challenges: Technology – While having the right technology in place is rarely the sole success factor, it certainly is an important contributor. Some organisations can deploy third-party technology quite swiftly, but many grapple with internal integration issues and how well existing platforms communicate with each other. Time and time again in digital marketing, disparate technology platforms feature among the most commonly cited issues and attribution is no exception, with 41% of companies surveyed mentioning it. Data – There’s no denying that marketers are often overwhelmed by the volume of customer data and the survey results reiterated this, with nearly two in five (37%) client-side respondents pointing to complexity of data as having a detrimental effect on the success of their attribution programmes. Somewhat ironically, this is why good attribution models are so
  32. 32. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 32 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 important, as they provide marketers with the confidence to delve into this complex data landscape and generate insights that can be acted upon. Perhaps more worryingly, 37% indicate that auctioning the insights they get is an impediment. These are the marketers who, aided by marketing attribution, have managed to sift through the data and find meaningful information to make decisions and prioritise improvement initiatives. However, turning these insights into action has proven to be a bottleneck. This is often either because they don’t have the necessary processes and technologies in place to act on their attribution results or because there’s a lack of communication between those who uncover the insights and those who have the power (or willingness in many cases) to act upon them. Skills – As we’ve hinted above, technology alone can’t solve the attribution conundrum. Organisations need to invest in increasing their internal capabilities around analysis and optimisation, two activities which typically fall under the remit of analysts. Although we’ve witnessed an increasing supply of skilled people recently, over a quarter of client-side respondents say that a lack of analysts prevents them from using attribution more effectively. Defining the online customer journey is another are which requires a fair amount of attention and due diligence. The aim of such an initiative is not to isolate events or steps that customers take towards a purchase, but to be able to set goals for attribution that accurately reflect this journey. Studies have shown that no single channel, be it online or offline, carries the load, so focusing on one portion of the customer journey is not only counter-productive, but can backfire at some point. Admittedly, defining the customer journey is no easy task and is often held back by channel politics, which are among the most difficult to trace underlying issues. This particularly becomes a problem when some teams over-emphasise the role the channel they oversee plays in the overall marketing mix. This might lead to undercutting the value and impact of other channels. Please elaborate on the problems you or your clients have experienced with marketing attribution. “Getting it set up... how to define who gets what part or what achieved success.” “Lack of visibility on what drives the algorithm. Lack of publicly available information about the attribution model.” “The model lags, so doesn’t reflect current performance. The model doesn’t align to last-click attribution, so weekly/monthly digital reporting doesn’t align to the larger model.” “We are tied to a tech code base that is in almost permanent lockdown and a CMS that is clunky, inflexible and painful to work with.” “Lack of talent. Additionally, partners such as Facebook do not pass back device ID data or impression-level data, making view-through conversion analysis very difficult.” “Collating data in time for it to be actionable. Spend data is disparate, and a manual process. Publisher data doesn’t necessarily align with the strategies that we allocate budget to, and classification is manual.” “Interpreting the data into actionable insights. Not sure as to how to properly roll out a strategy of how to deploy attribution findings into operation.” “It is difficult to prove that an increase in performance was due to moving toward a more bespoke methodology. We’re looking at ways of doing this via test and control at a market level, but it’s difficult to eliminate ‘noise’.” Survey respondents
  33. 33. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 33 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Please elaborate on the problems you or your clients have experienced with marketing attribution. (cont.) “Our clients don’t trust the data.” “Understanding multiple touchpoint attribution.” “Each platform we use has its own reports and dashboards which make it hard to compare and join everything into one big picture. Google Analytics is using last-touch as a default. Now many clients don’t know how to use even a simple Google Analytics dashboard so it’s hard to explain and drive them towards multichannel attribution without going into technical details.” “We suspect these are the same problems as most companies have relative to tech: customer journeys spanning multiple platforms, quality of data and resources to carry out the analysis.” “It is an extremely limited way to run your business and only accounts for a small part of qualifying hot prospects – very overrated.” Survey respondents Receiving impartial advice and support from third parties and ensuring that the insights are not biased in any way is another key requirement when undergoing a marketing attribution programme. Yet, as the chart below shows, only half of companies surveyed claim they are confident that their agency is impartial when carrying out marketing attribution on their behalf. Additionally, as seen in Figure 26, 12% say they don’t trust the data. Company respondents Figure 27: How confident are you that your agency is impartial when carrying out marketing attribution? Respondents: 10
  34. 34. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 34 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 10. Appendix: Respondent Profiles Figure 28: In which country or region are you based? Respondents: 422 Figure 29: Which best describes your job role? Company respondents: 196 Agency respondents: 210
  35. 35. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 35 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Company respondents Figure 30: In which business sector is your organisation? Respondents: 196 Figure 31: Are you/your clients more focused on B2B or B2C marketing? Company respondents: 196 Agency respondents: 209
  36. 36. State of Marketing Attribution in Asia Pacific in association with Datalicious Page 36 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2015 Agency respondents Figure 32: Which type of company do you work for? Respondents: 210 Figure 33: What is your annual company revenue? Company respondents: 116 Agency respondents: 135

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