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How do you handle stress?
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September2016

  1. 1. According to the Department of Labor, the average person today can expect to experience five to seven career changes in a lifetime. Common reasons cited for changing careers include: frustration and disillusionment in a job that does not allow an employee to use his/her best abilities, redundancy or business closure, working in a diminished industry, realignment of values often as a midlife re-evaluation, dislike of the current organizational culture or boss, and money. When it comes to major life events, five of the top twenty listed in the Holmes-Rahe Life Stress Inventory The Social Readjustment Scale relate directly to changes in the workplace. The more of these that occur simultaneously in your life, the higher your chances of experiencing stress and with it, health issues. The biggest predictor of how these changes might result in health issues stems from how you adapt to these changes. People who do not perceive change through a fight or flight lens experience less stress and with it fewer health issues. As educated women this comes as no surprise. But, what can you do when the change, itself, is beyond your control? First, realize that while you cannot control a situation, you have complete control over your reaction. Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, a Harvard-trained brain scientist, understands, first-hand, what it means to control her reactions. At the age of 37 she experienced a stroke when a blood vessel exploded in her brain. She watched her mind deteriorate and understood the physiology as she experienced the stroke. Her book, My Stroke of Insight, a New York Times Bestseller, describes the awakening that led her to understand how, in 90 seconds, you can redirect the Communiqué Communiqué Monthly newsletter for chapter members September 2016 amygdala – the part of your brain responsible for fight or flight – to calm down. This awareness, literally saved her life. It doesn’t get more real than that! From Dr. Bolte Taylor’s research, consider the following five BACKUP steps. 1.) B- When you experience stressful change, immediately take 90 seconds to breathe. This small act helps to dissipate the chemical reaction in your blood, taking your body off autopilot, allowing you to decide how you want to react. 2.) A- Approach the change with curiosity, not anger. What opportunities might result from the change? 3.) C- Remember anger shuts down your creativity and leaves you stranded without options. When you dissipate the anger by shutting down the response of your amygdala, your mind is free to problem solve because it is not trying to protect you. 4.) K- Keep your focus positive. Be open to possibilities in your situation. 5.) UP- Reframe your inner dialog in a positive, upbeat voice. “I wonder what this might mean in the long run?” Practice the BACKUP strategy daily so that it becomes your first response to change. For more ideas on how to embrace change, sign up for the AWC Fall Workshop: Pieces of You, Navigating Change to be held on Friday, September 23 from 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Registration ends September 18. Members receive a special registration rate of $50. Read the topics; sign up today. Bloomington-Normal ChapterBloomington-Normal Chapter It Takes 90 Seconds to Affect Change! by Jackie Langhoff
  2. 2. Friday, September 23 • 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Illinois State University Alumni Center • 1101 N.Main St.,Normal Maria HenneberryIn her opening session, It’s all about money…but has nothing to do with it, Maria Henneberry will share tips, insights and strategies to help women position themselves to welcome change. As a former Associated Press award-winning journalist and news anchor, Henneberry attributes her relationship with money to be the driving force that allows her the freedom to create the life of her dreams. She has taken her own brand of financial savvy to new heights. Henneberry was instrumental in building two digital media production companies whose client list includes national nonprofit agencies, universities and Fortune 500 companies, her work nationally and internationally distributed. Her unique brand of warmth, honesty and storytelling will inspire others to embrace change. Register at www.awcbn.org by September 18. Join us, and explore how YOU view change. Learn new strategies to make change work for YOU! Other Hands-On Sessions: • Jackie Langhoff, Myself 4 Life Coaching The Energy of Emotional Intelligence: Creating Powerful Change Makers • Becky Mentzer, private practice No Joke,Humor CanWork in theWorkplace • DanaVogelmeier, State Farm Change is Coming…how to accept and adapt with grace Pricing: $65 for the public • $50 for AWC members • $20 for students Price includes: •continental breakfast and lunch •comic relief titled, Life’s Funny That Way! by Terri Ryburn, known as Dr. T. 2
  3. 3. We’ve all heard the expressions… the only constant is change. Change is never easy. There is nothing wrong with change, if it is in the right direction. Change before you have to. No words can alter the fact that change is hard on individuals and teams alike. When faced with an unexpected or unwelcomed transition, it’s human nature to immediately descend into fear and doubt…and that’s why I’m personally looking forward to this year’s Fall Workshop on navigating change, both personally and professionally. As baby girl Navickas prepares to arrive in mid-October, I’ve certainly had change on my mind. My entire life will undoubtedly change on a personal level, but my fear is how this change will impact my work at Illinois State University. When change comes unexpectedly, it’s difficult to navigate that change, especially among a team in a professional environment. As leaders in the communication discipline, keep these five tips in mind for the workplace when change inevitably strikes: 1. Set the Expectation that Change is Inevitable Oftentimes when a change turns negative, it’s because of unspoken expectations. As a leader, frequently communicate your vision of the company as a dynamic and evolving organization, where progress and change are inevitable. If your co-workers hear this message when they’re first hired, and you reinforce the thought frequently through your mission and vision statements, and other company messaging, you can prevent many of your team members from settling into complacency or assuming they work for a static organization. 2. Understand the “How Will It Affect Me?” Principle Whether your change is positive, every employee will go straight to, “How will this affect me?” Accept the fact that any time there’s a major development at work – positive or not – there will be a natural dip in productivity as individuals and teams react and adapt to a new paradigm, environment, organizational structure or leadership team. Your first message should not be, “Here’s what’s happening, and here’s what you should think about it.” This approach will only create additional resistance. Instead, look at the change through the eyes of each department or person, and give them time to work through their own individual reactions. 3. Never Package a Negative Change as a Positive One If you’re making an announcement, and you know your employees will view it negatively, the worst thing you can do is try to convince them that it’s actually a great thing for them. They will be able to see right through it, and they will view you as insincere and condescending. Just state the facts – including whatever relevant circumstances (not excuses) may have led to this point – sincerely acknowledge that it’s not ideal, and be available to answer questions. 4. Embrace the Change Cycle When it comes to change management, there’s no one-size-fits- all solution, and there’s no predictable timeline for when everyone will be enthusiastically on board. Each person will proceed at his or her own pace through “the change cycle,” which starts with feelings of loss, then doubt, then discomfort, followed by discovery, understanding, and finally integration. After you announce a change, expect for some to move through the cycle in a few hours and others to take a month. Rely on what you know about each individual member of your team, and after a while, reach out personally to those who seem to be stuck in doubt or discomfort. Allow them to voice their concerns, ask their questions, or even make their accusations. Seek first to understand, then to be understood as you try to help them make forward progress through the change cycle. 5. Watch Out for the Underminers Your chances of getting 100% of your employees completely on board with big changes can be slim. Once you’ve made the announcement, give people ample time to work through their reactions, and offer personal assistance to the stragglers, if you’re still noticing hotbeds of resistance or negativity, then it’s time for a different kind of conversation. As a leader, your best approach is to create a culture that embraces change. Respect everyone’s right to have their own reactions, communicate the news with authenticity and empathy, and give everyone time to work through the change cycle at an individual pace. Remember, the Fall Workshop will take place on Friday, September 23rd at the Alumni Center. On behalf of the board of the Association for Women in Communications, we hope to see your registration soon at www.awcbn.org! Adapted from Eric Morgan’s “5 Tips for Effectively Managing Change” A Note from the President: Julie Navickas chapter president Communiqué Communiqué Bloomington-Normal ChapterBloomington-Normal Chapter September 2016 3 The Only Constant is Change…Leveraging your Team Effectively
  4. 4. I think most of us dread the idea of keeping our resumes up to date. It’s about as much fun as cleaning out a sock drawer. For anyone who has become a seasoned professional, you might struggle with format, length and how much is too much information. Welcome the introduction of the visual resume. Others refer to it as an infographic-style resume. I recently discovered one option that is easier than most because it converts your LinkedIn profile into something more visual and easy to digest. Visualize Me It’s a new resume tool called Vizualize.me. Vizualize.me Founder Eugene Woo told an IT publication recently, “The average resume is now over two pages long with more than 1,000 words. Who wants to deal with that?” My recruiter friend Patty Martin agrees. I sent her my Vizualize.me resume, and she said she would much rather look at this than a traditional resume. “I only have a couple of seconds to scan a resume, so a visual makes it so much easier,” she said. I don’t love that there isn’t much flexibility with templates. For example, I would like to de-emphasize my education and take off the years (It ages me). But, it doesn’t give you that option. The good news is this is a free service and it’s in the beta stage so I’m sure changes are on the way. More Help Online Here is a link to another article about Visualize.me and other options for presenting a more visual, professional version of your work history and experiences that make you attractive to a potential employer. I’ve tried to do an infographic resume using a general, infographic site such as Canva.com, and it wasn’t as easy. If you can get past her hipster style, I really like this video tutorial of how to do a visual resume using the platform Piktochart. A Google search will help you come up with others. Some people don’t like the idea of putting their photo on their resume. You don’t have to that with one of these visual resume templates but honestly it seems the trend is toward hiring managers wanting to feel a connection and well-taken photo can help you be more relatable. Most templates I found do give you the option of leaving off a photo. However, keep in mind, LinkedIn experts say your profile is 14 times more likely to be viewed if it has a photo. I feel your pain because I hate photos of myself. Just get the best version of you and consider using it. You might be worried because some companies are looking for younger employees. It is a concern I’ve grappled with, but I came to the conclusion that I would never want to work for an employer with an ageist culture? Good luck if you decide to give this a try. I did and managed to get sucked in to trying different options. I found it was slightly more fun than cleaning out my sock drawer. Presenting Your Professional Image Visually by Colleen Reynolds Communiqué Communiqué Bloomington-Normal ChapterBloomington-Normal Chapter September 2016 4 Send announcements about local events, promotions, career changes, birth announcements, milestones, awards and other celebrations to Angie Coughlin no later than October 1st to be included in the October Communiqué.
  5. 5. The AWC Fall Membership campaign is underway. Now is the time to invite your friends, co-workers and colleagues to join our group. From September 17 through December 1, the $50 application fee is waived for new applicatants. Membership Benefits Include: CONNECT: Build connections in your community and across the nation. • Join a diverse network of vibrant communicators by making valuable connections through involvement in national activities, committees and taskforces throughout the year. • Build your professional network with AWC members through friendships, mentors and referrals • Connect with members across the nation through the online AWC National Directory. • Rely on AWC connections for the support you need in all your lifelong endeavors. ENGAGE: Commit to engage in activities that benefit you and other members. • Attend AWC National Events for networking opportunities and interaction with national-level speakers. • Nominate your peers for recognition as outstanding communicators for chapter and national awards, the AWC Headliner Award, the Rising Star Award and more. • Participate in learning opportunities through webinars, conference events, Twitter Chat and local educational activities. ADVANCE: Prepare your career for the next opportunity. • Access career opportunities across the nation through the online AWC Job Board. • Promote your creativity and expertise by entering the prestigious Clarion Awards. • Gain insights on emerging issues through chapter and national communications. • Enjoy special rates and mentoring while obtaining your Certified Communications Professional (CCP) through AWC’s affiliation with the AWC Matrix Foundation. LEADERSHIP: Develop and implement leadership skills to benefit all of AWC. • Volunteer to serve in a leadership capacity to set the direction for your community. • Actively participate in local and national AWC activities. • Sponsor local student chapters at area colleges and universities. • Become a mentor to new communicators. • Serve on a national committee to share your knowledge and skills. • Join the national board to advance the mission of AWC. Enjoy professional discounts. • Members receive discounts on all AWC events and products, including webinars, conference activities and Clarion entries. • Members receive discounts on all AWC Job Board products & services. • Members receive discounts on LegalShield’s legal services and Penny Wise office products. Support AWC from the comfort of your own home. • Purchases made through AWC’s Amazon affiliate link benefit the organization. Founded in 1909, AWC is a professional organization that champions the advancement of women across all communications disciplines by recognizing excellence, promoting leadership, and positioning its members at the forefront of the evolving communications era. Membership Has Its Privileges by Kari McMullen Communiqué Communiqué Bloomington-Normal ChapterBloomington-Normal Chapter September 2016 5 • Sarah Schlagetter, ISU Welcome New Members • Chapter President Julie Navickas was honored as a recipient of the Pantagraph & Chamber of Commerce’s 20 Under 40 award. • Heather Wagner is a proud parent of baby girl – Addison May, born July 15! • Judith Valente is the winner of a Women in Communications Broadcast Award in the TV category for a segment she reported on PBS-TV's "Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly" program about St. Benedict's Preparatory School in Newark, NJ. St. Benedict's is run by a group of Benedictine monks who stress monastic principles of community, hospitality, listening, humility and simplicity within their school as well as academic achievement. St. Benedict's educates boys in Newark's inner city who otherwise might be at risk of joining gangs or the drug culture. Subsequent to Judith's segment appearing on PBS, St. Benedict's was the subject of a profile on "60 Minutes" on CBS-TV. Judith also led a retreat at the Sophia Retreat Center in Atchison, KS Sept 23-24 on "The Art of Pausing: Reclaiming a Sense of Balance in Our Lives." Congratulations Save the Date The AWC Crystal Awards will be Thurs., Feb. 23, 2017 at the Double Tree Hotel & Conference Center. Registration and additional information to come!
  6. 6. Formembershipinformation,visitwww.awcbn.org, contactKariMcMullenatawcbn.org@gmail.com, orphone(815)662-5AWC. September 17-December 1, 2016! 6
  7. 7. Fall is in the air, and we are excited that school has finally started. We are especially looking forward to all of the events taking place around campus. Festival ISU is one of our favorite ways to encourage new members to come to our first meeting. We will be handing out flyers and fill a signup sheet alongside all of the other registered student organizations on campus. Our first new member meeting was scheduled for Tuesday, September 6th, at 6:30 p.m. We visited a few popular Communication classrooms to announce our new member meeting and invited students to attend. During this meeting, we announced the opportunity to run for our committee positions and encouraged new applicants. Later our executive board will read over applications and make decisions on our committee members collectively. The positions that are open include: Vice President, Professional Development Chair, Social Chair, Social Media Chair, and Membership/Recruitment Chair. Moving forward, more committee positions may open up under these chair positions to encourage more students to have a role in AWC. Enthusiastically we heard that our returning members enjoyed the panel that took place last year with women from the professional chapter. Since that program was popular, we plan to coordinate a similar meeting on Tuesday, September 20th. Please mark your calendars, and plan to participate! Your experience and knowledge is invaluable to us as students. As we look forward, the student chapter awaits a year filled with learning and networking opportunities for our members to build on for the future. Student Chapter Update: Communiqué Communiqué Bloomington-Normal ChapterBloomington-Normal Chapter September 2016 7 • Chapter President Julie Navickas, Illinois State University • President-Elect Kara Pool Snyder, Illinois State University • Past President Jackie Langhoff, Myself 4 Life Coaching • Vice President of Membership Kari McMullen, State Farm • Vice President of Communications Kris Harding, Illinois State University • Vice President of Finance Helen Dobbyn Reedy, Illinois Farm Bureau • Vice President of Programming, Freedom of Information/Progress of Women Chair Sarah Julian, Country Financial • Historian/Secretary Rachel Kobus, Illinois State University • Community Involvement Chair Christy Germanis, YWCA McLean County • Professional Development/Scholarship Chair Molly Davis, Illinois State University • Fall Workshop Chair Becky Mentzer, Private Practice • Communiqué Editor Angie Coughlin, Heartland Community College • Communiqué Layout Jackie Langhoff, Myself 4 Life Coaching • Student Chapter Liaison Christine Reis, Illinois State University Executive Board Get Involved! Your Membership Counts • Join the Communication Committee. Contact Kris Harding. • Join the Community Involvement Committee. Contact Christy Germanis. • Write a newletter article. Contact Angie Coughlin. • Join the member-only Working Moms (Rachel Hatch). or Social Media Affinity group (Ann Aubry). 2016-2017 Julia Gramont ATTN: Working Moms Members are invited to join Rachel Hatch On Thursday, October 6 from 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. at Flat Top Grill for the Working Moms Affinity Group luncheon.

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