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More Than a Feeling: Data-Informed Design

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When it comes to design, everyone has an opinion! However, during reviews and discussions it’s those with more than an opinion that fair the best. Successful design solutions require a deep understanding of audiences, clear strategy, and good ole data.
In this session you’ll learn:
- common data sources for design,
- how to build a data-informed approach,
- what data-informed design looks like in the wild (aka case studies).

Whether you’re trying to prove a point, make an improvement, or discover something new, data-informed design moves your team from gut-feelings to fact-based decisions.

Publicado en: Diseño
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More Than a Feeling: Data-Informed Design

  1. 1. Big Design Conference • Sept 21, 2018 MORE THAN Data-informed Design A FEELING
  2. 2. How Designers are Building Careers in Silicon Valley from KPCB
  3. 3. We don’t have enough people with business sense to fill those seats. Source: How Designers are Building Careers in Silicon Valley
  4. 4. What we see is the design leader who cares about business, who is moving into more product roles. Source: How Designers are Building Careers in Silicon Valley
  5. 5. To achieve great design, you need great business thinking and doing… Source: How Designers are Building Careers in Silicon Valley
  6. 6. Who are you? 1
  7. 7. Courtney Clark Managing Director of User Experience • Forum One @circlish https://www.linkedin.com/in/clarkcourtney/
  8. 8. What is the difference between data-informed and data-driven? 2
  9. 9. Intuition Data-informed Data-driven No or minimal data used. Design intuition, hunches. Using both expertise and data to analyze and make decisions. Blindly following the data. No humans or intuition used.
  10. 10. Source: Metrics Driven Design, Joshua Porter
  11. 11. Source: Metrics Driven Design, Joshua Porter
  12. 12. Why data-informed design? 3
  13. 13. Discover Improve Justify Tell Better Stories Support discussion. Justify decisions. Speak approvers’ language. Support your cause. Uncover new information. Discover possibilities. Optimize. Increase conversions. Measure before / after. Grow Skill Communicate with analysts. Improve your portfolio. Be Strategic Confirm you’re headed in the right direction.
  14. 14. Create the Best Possible Product Achieving business goals. Supporting primary audience.
  15. 15. You Probably Have Some Data Use it!
  16. 16. What data can I use to inform my design? 4
  17. 17. Da·ta (ˈdadə,ˈdādə/) n. facts and statistics collected together for reference and analysis
  18. 18. Digital Analytics Search Data Social Media Data Email Engagement Data Grant Data Fundraising Data Financial Data Impact Data Research Data Volunteer Data Event Attendance Data Demographic Data Brand Sentiment Data Brand Lift Data Competitor, Comparator Data Net Promoter Score So much data!
  19. 19. What People Do What People Say Why & How to Fix How Many, How Much First-click Testing Interviews Usability Testing Source: Nielsen Norman Group A/B Testing Feedback Widget Email Surveys
  20. 20. HEART Framework Source: Google Ventures Happiness, Engagement, Adoption, Retention, Task Success
  21. 21. Source: Google Ventures, Digital Telepathy
  22. 22. Source: Google Ventures, Digital Telepathy H E A R T Happiness Engagement Adoption Retention Task Success Measures of user attitudes, often collected via survey. Level of user involvement. Gaining new users of a product or feature. The rate at which existing users are returning. Efficiency, effectiveness, and error rate. Examples ● Satisfaction ● Perceived ease of use ● Net-promoter score Examples ● Number of visits per user per week ● Number of photos uploaded per user per day ● Number of shares Examples ● Upgrades to the latest version ● New subscriptions created ● Purchases made by new users Examples ● Number of active users remaining present over time ● Renewal rate or failure to retain (churn) ● Repeat purchases Examples ● Search result success ● Time to upload a photo ● Profile creation complete
  23. 23. Source: Google Ventures, Digital Telepathy H E A R T Happiness Engagement Adoption Retention Task Success Measures of user attitudes, often collected via survey. Level of user involvement. Gaining new users of a product or feature. The rate at which existing users are returning. Efficiency, effectiveness, and error rate. Examples ● Satisfaction ● Perceived ease of use ● Net-promoter score Examples ● Number of visits per user per week ● Number of photos uploaded per user per day ● Number of shares Examples ● Upgrades to the latest version ● New subscriptions created ● Purchases made by new users Examples ● Number of active users remaining present over time ● Renewal rate or failure to retain (churn) ● Repeat purchases Examples ● Search result success ● Time to upload a photo ● Profile creation complete Survey Digital Analytics Usability Testing
  24. 24. Source: Google Ventures, Digital Telepathy Goals Signals Metrics Get goals from different team members. Build consensus. Best predictors of associated goals. Data you’ll track over time. Example For people to enjoy, discover, and engage with content. Example The amount of time people spend engaging with content. Example Average engagement time with content per day. Key Questions ● How will the user experience help? ● Are you interested in increasing the engagement of existing users or in attracting new users? Key Questions ● How easy or difficult is each signal to track? ● Is your product instrumented to log the relevant actions, or could it be? ● Is this signal sensitive to changes in your design? Key Questions ● Will you actually use these numbers to help you make a decision? ● Do you really need to track them over time, or is a current snapshot sufficient?
  25. 25. Source: Google Ventures, Digital Telepathy
  26. 26. Only need to use categories or data relevant to your goal or product.
  27. 27. How to build a data-informed approach? 5
  28. 28. 1. Set up a meeting with your business analyst, analytics team, data person 2. Inventory the data you have on your project now 3. Fill out the HEART worksheet 4. Design! 5. Iterate, test, improve 6. Reflect and debrief with your team Get Started
  29. 29. Ask yourself: What data do we have? How will we get data to validate this?
  30. 30. What challenges will I face with data-informed design? 6
  31. 31. Data Availability & Skills
  32. 32. GOOD BAD UGLY 90% of nonprofits are collecting data 49% don’t know ways their org is collecting 13% never or rarely use data. Source: Everyaction • 2016 • The State of Nonprofit Data white paper
  33. 33. Not collecting enough data 36% Source: Everyaction • 2016 • The State of Nonprofit Data white paper Lack of tools to help analyze data Data isn’t kept in one place Don’t have enough experience using data Not enough time, or personnel to focus on data 42% 46% 55% 79%
  34. 34. Over-indexing on Data-driven
  35. 35. I had a recent debate over whether a border should be 3, 4 or 5 pixels wide, and was asked to prove my case. Source: Goodbye Google, Douglas Bowman
  36. 36. Source: Metrics Driven Design, Joshua Porter
  37. 37. Wait, why should I care about this? 7
  38. 38. To achieve great design, you need great business thinking and doing… Source: How Designers are Building Careers in Silicon Valley
  39. 39. Discover Improve Justify Tell Better Stories Support discussion. Justify decisions. Speak approvers’ language. Support your cause. Uncover new information. Discover possibilities. Optimize. Increase conversions. Measure before / after. Grow Skill Communicate with analysts. Improve your portfolio. Be Strategic Confirm you’re headed in the right direction.
  40. 40. Now what? 8
  41. 41. 1. Set up a meeting with your business analyst, analytics team, data person 2. Inventory the data you have on your project now 3. Fill out the HEART worksheet 4. Design! 5. Iterate, test, improve 6. Reflect and debrief with your team Get Started
  42. 42. Keep Reading Data Informed Design, Not Data-Driven How to Choose the Right UX Metrics The Agony and Ecstasy of Building with Data Data-informed Design (5 Things I Learned the Hard Way) Data-driven vs Data-informed Design in Enterprise Products
  43. 43. Questions & Answers
  44. 44. Courtney Clark Managing Director of User Experience • Forum One @circlish https://www.linkedin.com/in/clarkcourtney/

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