Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
Designing effective
feedback processes
David Carless
University of Hong Kong
May 6, 2016
Hong Kong Institute of Education
...
Overview
1. Challenges and frustrations
2. Defining feedback
3. Prospects for dialogic feedback
4. Examples, issues & impl...
Frustrations
The University of Hong Kong
Staff frustrations
• Heavy marking load
• Students don’t collect feedback
• Students mainly interested in the grade
• Stud...
Marking & Grading
End of semester grading involves:
-Awarding a grade
-Justifying the grade
-Providing specific comments
-...
Student frustrations
Feedback often seems like a perversely belated
revelation of things that should have been made
clear ...
Differing perceptions
Study 1. Questionnaire data from 460 staff &
1740 students
+ qualitative data from BEd Students
Teac...
DEFINING & SITUATING
FEEDBACK
The University of Hong Kong
What does ‘feedback’ mean?
As dialogues around student work
The University of Hong Kong
As comments …
Providing informatio...
The University of Hong Kong
 
 
Comments Dialogue
Feedback as 
monologic 
information 
transfer 
Feedback as 
dialogic 
in...
Defining feedback
“A dialogic process in which learners make
sense of information from varied sources
and use it to enhanc...
Closing feedback loops
It’s only feedback
if students take
some action
The University of Hong Kong
Bigger picture
Feedback as
assessment design
issue
Feedback as a
pedagogical issue
Feedback as a
relational issue
The Univ...
The University of Hong Kong
Productive assessment
task design
Understanding quality in the
discipline
Student engagement
w...
Merry, Price, Carless, & Taras (2013)
Discussion
Share with a partner or small group,
one or two potentially promising
feedback strategies
The University of Hon...
FEEDBACK AS DIALOGUE
The University of Hong Kong
Dialogic feedback principles
• Process rather than product
• Prompting learner action
• Peers as active source of feedback...
Key aim of feedback
To enhance student
ability to self-monitor
their work in
progress
The University of Hong Kong
Dialogic feedback in practice
1. Teacher-facilitated dialogic feedback
2. Technology-enabled dialogic feedback
3. Peer fee...
Assessment dialogues
Discussing assessment processes to help
students understand rules of the game
(Carless, 2006)
The Uni...
Guidance & feedback
Integrated cycles of guidance & feedback
within learning processes (Hounsell et al.
2008)
The Universi...
Model of guidance & feedback
Preparatory Guidance
-Clarifying task
-Engaging with criteria
-Analyzing exemplars
Student se...
Cumulative task designs
• Task 1  feedback  interlinked task 2
• Position students as active feedback
seekers & users
Th...
Feedback designs
Activities in which students make judgments
The University of Hong Kong
Exemplars & feedback
Analysis of exemplars can support students
in decoding teacher feedback (To & Carless,
2015)
The Univ...
Exemplars: queries?
Questions or comments on using exemplars
of student work to illustrate aspects of
quality
The Universi...
TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED
STRATEGIES
The University of Hong Kong
Learning Management Systems
Storing and accessing feedback comments
Prompting students to act on prior feedback
(before re...
Online discussion forum
Business case: graded online participation
“Having a grading allocation … gives some
life to it” (...
Use of Facebook
More attractive to students than Moodle
(Deng & Tavares, 2013)
History students uploaded drafts & received...
Audio (& video) feedback
Providing recorded verbal commentary
(instead of written feedback?)
The University of Hong Kong
Audio feedback: pros
• Viewed positively by students (Lunt &
Curran, 2010)
• Shows concern; permits nuanced
feedback or de...
Audio feedback: cons
• ‘Moderate’ impact on student learning
(Gould & Day, 2013)
• Difficult in failure cases
• Workload? ...
STUDENT ROLE IN SEEKING,
GENERATING & USING
FEEDBACK
The University of Hong Kong
Peer involvement
The University of Hong Kong
Peer assessment with grades often resisted
Peer feedback or peer review (with...
Sharing: peer feedback
To what extent are your students willing and
active in engaging in peer feedback?
Any challenges or...
Peer feedback
Potentially more
plentiful …
But peers often viewed
as lacking expertise
The University of Hong Kong
Composing peer feedback
Providing feedback more cognitively engaging
than receiving feedback (e.g. Nicol et al., 2014)
The...
Sustainable feedback
Enhancing student role to generate & use
feedback (Carless et al., 2011; Hounsell,
2007)
The Universi...
SELECTED FEEDBACK
CHALLENGES
The University of Hong Kong
Confusion over purposes
Student & staff confusions around feedback
& what it can achieve (Price et al., 2010)
The Universi...
Failing to connect
Difficulties for lower achievers to make
sense of feedback (Orsmond & Merry, 2013)
The University of Ho...
Emotional reactions
Honest but constructive feedback
The University of Hong Kong
Care and trust
Feedback is a social and relational act:
Care (Sutton, 2012)
Trust (Carless, 2009, 2013)
The University of ...
Implications
The University of Hong Kong
Feedback literacy
Teachers need to
help students
understand
feedback & how
they can use it
The University of Hong Kong
Good feedback practice
Integration of feedback & task design;
Timely dialogues: online & peer feedback;
Development of stu...
Shifts in priorities
The University of Hong Kong
Increase Decrease
In-class guidance within course
time
Unidirectional com...
THANK YOU
The University of Hong Kong
Ongoing research
1. Dialogic use of exemplars
2. Longitudinal study of how students
process & use feedback
The University ...
Relieving feedback frustrations
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Relieving feedback frustrations

970 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Relieving feedback frustrations

Publicado en: Educación
  • Inicia sesión para ver los comentarios

Relieving feedback frustrations

  1. 1. Designing effective feedback processes David Carless University of Hong Kong May 6, 2016 Hong Kong Institute of Education The University of Hong Kong
  2. 2. Overview 1. Challenges and frustrations 2. Defining feedback 3. Prospects for dialogic feedback 4. Examples, issues & implications The University of Hong Kong
  3. 3. Frustrations The University of Hong Kong
  4. 4. Staff frustrations • Heavy marking load • Students don’t collect feedback • Students mainly interested in the grade • Students lack motivation to act ….. The University of Hong Kong
  5. 5. Marking & Grading End of semester grading involves: -Awarding a grade -Justifying the grade -Providing specific comments -Providing generic comments -Reciprocity The University of Hong Kong
  6. 6. Student frustrations Feedback often seems like a perversely belated revelation of things that should have been made clear earlier (Crook, Gross & Dymott, 2006) The University of Hong Kong
  7. 7. Differing perceptions Study 1. Questionnaire data from 460 staff & 1740 students + qualitative data from BEd Students Teachers thought their feedback was more useful than students did (Carless, 2006) The University of Hong Kong
  8. 8. DEFINING & SITUATING FEEDBACK The University of Hong Kong
  9. 9. What does ‘feedback’ mean? As dialogues around student work The University of Hong Kong As comments … Providing information about performance AND/ OR
  10. 10. The University of Hong Kong     Comments Dialogue Feedback as  monologic  information  transfer  Feedback as  dialogic  interaction 
  11. 11. Defining feedback “A dialogic process in which learners make sense of information from varied sources and use it to enhance the quality of their work or learning strategies”. Carless (2015, p.192) building on Boud & Molloy (2013) The University of Hong Kong
  12. 12. Closing feedback loops It’s only feedback if students take some action The University of Hong Kong
  13. 13. Bigger picture Feedback as assessment design issue Feedback as a pedagogical issue Feedback as a relational issue The University of Hong Kong
  14. 14. The University of Hong Kong Productive assessment task design Understanding quality in the discipline Student engagement with feedback Learning-oriented assessment framework
  15. 15. Merry, Price, Carless, & Taras (2013)
  16. 16. Discussion Share with a partner or small group, one or two potentially promising feedback strategies The University of Hong Kong
  17. 17. FEEDBACK AS DIALOGUE The University of Hong Kong
  18. 18. Dialogic feedback principles • Process rather than product • Prompting learner action • Peers as active source of feedback • Inner dialogue, internal feedback The University of Hong Kong
  19. 19. Key aim of feedback To enhance student ability to self-monitor their work in progress The University of Hong Kong
  20. 20. Dialogic feedback in practice 1. Teacher-facilitated dialogic feedback 2. Technology-enabled dialogic feedback 3. Peer feedback and internal feedback (Nicol, 2010) The University of Hong Kong
  21. 21. Assessment dialogues Discussing assessment processes to help students understand rules of the game (Carless, 2006) The University of Hong Kong
  22. 22. Guidance & feedback Integrated cycles of guidance & feedback within learning processes (Hounsell et al. 2008) The University of Hong Kong
  23. 23. Model of guidance & feedback Preparatory Guidance -Clarifying task -Engaging with criteria -Analyzing exemplars Student self-monitoring -Seeking & using feedback -Peer review -Self-evaluation Ongoing clarification -Opportunities for practice -Apply criteria -Review work in progress
  24. 24. Cumulative task designs • Task 1  feedback  interlinked task 2 • Position students as active feedback seekers & users The University of Hong Kong
  25. 25. Feedback designs Activities in which students make judgments The University of Hong Kong
  26. 26. Exemplars & feedback Analysis of exemplars can support students in decoding teacher feedback (To & Carless, 2015) The University of Hong Kong
  27. 27. Exemplars: queries? Questions or comments on using exemplars of student work to illustrate aspects of quality The University of Hong Kong
  28. 28. TECHNOLOGY-ENABLED STRATEGIES The University of Hong Kong
  29. 29. Learning Management Systems Storing and accessing feedback comments Prompting students to act on prior feedback (before receiving more feedback) The University of Hong Kong
  30. 30. Online discussion forum Business case: graded online participation “Having a grading allocation … gives some life to it” (Carless, 2015, p. 124) Sense of cumulativeness vs stating own opinion The University of Hong Kong
  31. 31. Use of Facebook More attractive to students than Moodle (Deng & Tavares, 2013) History students uploaded drafts & received peer feedback (Carless, 2015) The University of Hong Kong
  32. 32. Audio (& video) feedback Providing recorded verbal commentary (instead of written feedback?) The University of Hong Kong
  33. 33. Audio feedback: pros • Viewed positively by students (Lunt & Curran, 2010) • Shows concern; permits nuanced feedback or detail (Savin-Baden, 2010) • May resemble a dialogue (Nicol, 2010) The University of Hong Kong
  34. 34. Audio feedback: cons • ‘Moderate’ impact on student learning (Gould & Day, 2013) • Difficult in failure cases • Workload? (Hennessy & Forester, 2014) The University of Hong Kong
  35. 35. STUDENT ROLE IN SEEKING, GENERATING & USING FEEDBACK The University of Hong Kong
  36. 36. Peer involvement The University of Hong Kong Peer assessment with grades often resisted Peer feedback or peer review (without grades) generally more attractive
  37. 37. Sharing: peer feedback To what extent are your students willing and active in engaging in peer feedback? Any challenges or good strategies to share … The University of Hong Kong
  38. 38. Peer feedback Potentially more plentiful … But peers often viewed as lacking expertise The University of Hong Kong
  39. 39. Composing peer feedback Providing feedback more cognitively engaging than receiving feedback (e.g. Nicol et al., 2014) The University of Hong Kong
  40. 40. Sustainable feedback Enhancing student role to generate & use feedback (Carless et al., 2011; Hounsell, 2007) The University of Hong Kong
  41. 41. SELECTED FEEDBACK CHALLENGES The University of Hong Kong
  42. 42. Confusion over purposes Student & staff confusions around feedback & what it can achieve (Price et al., 2010) The University of Hong Kong
  43. 43. Failing to connect Difficulties for lower achievers to make sense of feedback (Orsmond & Merry, 2013) The University of Hong Kong
  44. 44. Emotional reactions Honest but constructive feedback The University of Hong Kong
  45. 45. Care and trust Feedback is a social and relational act: Care (Sutton, 2012) Trust (Carless, 2009, 2013) The University of Hong Kong
  46. 46. Implications The University of Hong Kong
  47. 47. Feedback literacy Teachers need to help students understand feedback & how they can use it The University of Hong Kong
  48. 48. Good feedback practice Integration of feedback & task design; Timely dialogues: online & peer feedback; Development of student self-regulation for sustainable feedback The University of Hong Kong
  49. 49. Shifts in priorities The University of Hong Kong Increase Decrease In-class guidance within course time Unidirectional comments after course completion Written feedback comments on first assessment task of module Written feedback comments on final task of module Feedback for first year students Feedback for final year students
  50. 50. THANK YOU The University of Hong Kong
  51. 51. Ongoing research 1. Dialogic use of exemplars 2. Longitudinal study of how students process & use feedback The University of Hong Kong

×