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How Much is Too Much for Young Gymnasts? PDF Slides

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PDF Slides to an online webinar I did for workload science usage in gymnastics.

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How Much is Too Much for Young Gymnasts? PDF Slides

  1. 1. How Much Is Too Much? Practical Applications of Workload Science in Gymnastics 1 By Dr. Dave Tilley DPT, SCS, CSCS
  2. 2. Why Talk Workloads in Gymnastics? 2 This is by far the “hottest topic” in all sports But particularly in high intensity sports that involve young athletes who specialize early Lots of great information and research emerging every week
  3. 3. But Not in Gymnastics … So What Do We Do? 3 Learn and implement the best available information on workloads Supported by • Being a human • Coaching Expertise • Medical / Injury Research • Strength and Conditioning Research
  4. 4. 4 Ideal Work to Rest Ratios Plan Stress Recover “Tinker” Cultures, Values, Habits Research Ar:cles/Books : 1-7
  5. 5. 5 Cultures, Values, Habits What are my values/goals? What are our gyms values/goals? How will we represent this in our daily choices, habits, actions when working with gymnasts in training?
  6. 6. A leader’s values, morals, actions, habits influence : • Adherence to exercise (coming to practice) 8 • Burnout rates in athletes 9 • Injury rates and time missed from practice or competition 10 • Anxiety levels in practice and competition 11-12 • Antisocial or social interactions (engagement with peers) 13 • Intrinsic motivation and trust in leaders 14-15 • Moral development and social responsibility levels 16-17 Research Articles/Books : 8-17
  7. 7. 7 Cultures, Values, Habits What Are My Values/Goals? Be a good person, work ridiculously hard, make the gym a better place What Are Our Gyms Values/Goals? 1. Health 2. Build Great Humans 3. Build Great Gymnasts
  8. 8. 8 Cultures, Values, Habits How will we represent this with our choices, habits, actions in training? • All gymnasts welcome, but must follow “culture guidelines” • Their gymnastics, not ours • Role model and expect “be a good person, work really ridiculously hard” • Radical transparency and communication policy
  9. 9. 9 Plan The Basic Human Equation Proper dose of stress + Proper dose recovery = adaptation The aspirin analogy… • Too much = over train • Too li;le = under prepared Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 18-21
  10. 10. 10 Plan Gabbett (2018) in Evidenced Based Strength and Conditioning by Turner and Comfort
  11. 11. 11 Plan Gabbett (2018) in Evidenced Based Strength and Conditioning by Turner and Comfort “Goldilocks and The Three Bears”
  12. 12. 12 Plan - Gymnastics Year Block Month Week Day Event Research Articles/Books : 2-5, 7, 22
  13. 13. 13 Plan - Gymnastics Peak Nationals Skills, Power, Intervals 3 on 1 off 2 Heavy, 2 Med, 1 Light, 2 Off Heavy Training Assignment
  14. 14. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 14 Baseball à Pitch counts, return to throwing programs Running/Football à Mileage logged, return to running programs Gymnastics à Womens - # Hyper Ext, Lower Impacts Mens - # Wrist Impacts, Shoulder Intensive, Lower Body Impacts Tramp - # bounces + flight time Tumbling - # Impact + low / med / high intensity Rhythmic - # advanced skills or most provocative Research Articles/Books : 23-26
  15. 15. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 15 1. The inverted “U Curve” and fitness bring protective. Plan - Gymnastics “Sweet Spot” Under Prepared Over Taxed Research Articles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-29
  16. 16. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 16 Plan - Gymnastics Research Articles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-31
  17. 17. 17 2. “The journey is more important than the destination” Plan - Gymnastics Helpful Ideas from Workload Research Research Ar?cles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-31 Spike Gradual
  18. 18. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 18 “Decay” rates and “weighting” as very important concept Heavier Dose = More Recovery Needed Remember – Kids are not mini adults … they use a huge amount of energy to grow, learn, build new tissue, etc Plan - Gymnastics Research Articles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-31
  19. 19. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 19 The role of general athleticism and cross training for optimal performance, mental health, longevity, injury prevention Plan - Gymnastics Research Articles/Books : 5-6, 32-36
  20. 20. 20 Stress ”A moderate amount of work load can enhance performance and is protective against injury” Research Articles/Books : 1-6, 22, 27-29
  21. 21. 21 Stress Total Stress Emotional Mental Physical Research Articles/Books : 1-6, 32-55
  22. 22. 22 22% 11% 19% 48% Human Bank Account Physical Mental Emotional Reserve “The Human Bank Account” Analogy Withdrawals (Stressors) Mental Stress Emotional Stress Physical Stress Stress Research Articles/Books : 1-6, 32-55 4 Hours Practice Test or Meet This Weekend Social Media
  23. 23. Eternal vs Internal Stressors 23 External – the actual prescription of work Why? Can’t see what we don’t measure • 5 releases, 3 ring sequences • 10x 30s sled pushes • 2 hour studying • Time and intensity also good to use Very easy to track objectively, like “2 aspirin” Stress Research Articles/Books : 1, 28-31
  24. 24. 24 Internal – perceived challenge athlete reports and coping Why? No two athletes respond same + many other factors that impact training • Journaling • Perceived soreness, fatigue, etc • Wellness surveys • Daily conversations Stress Research Articles/Books : 1, 28-31
  25. 25. A Really Interesting Study on Leadership and Injury 25 Stress “Transforma/ve” type style of leadership correlated to less acute injuries, less overuse injuries, and less /me missed from prac/ce vs “dictatorship” type style of leadership (Ekstrand J., et al BJSM 2018)
  26. 26. 26 Recover “The Human Bank Account” Analogy Deposits (Recovery) Time Sleep Hydration Nutrition Activities That Decompress Human Bank Account Physical Mental Emotional Reserve Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 56-70 Slept and Fueled for Performance Movie With Friends Journaling or Talk with Friend
  27. 27. My personal order of importance based on research / experience 1. Time 2. Sleep 3. Nutrition 4. Hydration 5. Outside gym stress management 6. Dynamic Compression 7. Light Foam Rolling / Movement / Stretching 8. All the other fun stuff (ice/heat, fancy tools, stim) Recover Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 56-70
  28. 28. Time • Plan daily, weekly, monthly, yearly frameworks • Communication and transparency with gymnasts/staff Recover Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 56-70
  29. 29. Sleep <8 hours and especially < 6 correlated to impaired short and long term memory, coordina7on, power output, endurance • Have consistency sleep / wake cycles, even on weekends • Limit afternoon caffeine & alcohol • Aim for cooler room (68F) • Avoid blue light 30 - 60 min before bed Why We Sleep – Matthew Walker, PhD Recover Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 56-70
  30. 30. Nutrition Giving out nutritional advice, suggesting diet changes, or talking about calories / body image without advanced educational training is morally wrong and extremely dangerous “Fuel for performance" and collaboration Hydration Average 6-8 bottles per day by “sipping” not drinking entire bottle Recover Research Articles/Books : 1-5, 56-70
  31. 31. Remember YOU know your athletes the best • Ask in daily line up • Adjust as needed • “gas pedal brake pedal” • Talk with staff and parents 31 “Tinker”
  32. 32. Gymnastics Specific Suggestions 32 1. Use binders to write, plan, track strength and cardio 2. Epic staff mee<ng once yearly calendar established 3. Use coaching plans to write, plan and track skill, rou<ne, mock meet loads 4. Don’t be too rigid, LISTEN to athlete feedback and responses “Tinker”
  33. 33. Okay, so What Now? 33 1. Set ‘caps’ on highest risk sills per day Womens – hyper extensions and impacts Men’s – Impacts and Wrist Weight Bearing 2. Rotate daily event focus if doing all events Yurchenko VT, Release UB, Series BB à Dance FX Hard on VT, Dismounts PB à Inbar/Long Hang HB
  34. 34. Okay, So What Now? 34 3. Plan light, medium, heavy, off days through week - Factor in skill or routine volume, strength, and cardio 4. Build culture and habits of tracking, monitoring, radical transparency and communication 5. Be meticulous about planning framework of weekly assignments, then adjust as needed based on athlete feedback
  35. 35. Three REALLY Valuable Books on This 35
  36. 36. 36
  37. 37. References 37 • Gabbet TJ. (2018) Workload monitoring and athlete management. In Turner A, Comfort P; Advanced Strength and Conditioning: An Evidenced-Based Approach. New York: Routledge • Turner A., Comfort P. (2018) Periodization. In Turner A, Comfort P; Advanced Strength and Conditioning: An Evidenced-Based Approach. New York: Routledge, 116 - 136 • Lorenz D., Morrison S. Current Concepts in Periodization of Strength and Conditioning for the Sports Physical Therapist. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015 Nov; 10(6): 734-747. • MacDougall D, Sale D. Other Considerations: Peaking, Tapering, and Overtraining. In The Physiology of Training for High Performance. London: Oxford Press. 2014 311-319 • Haff GG. Periodization strategies for youth development. In Llyod RS, Oliver JL, Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes: Science and Application. 2014. Routledge: New York. 149-158 • Meeisem R., De Pauw K. The Overtraining Syndrome (OTS). In Cardinale, M., Newton R., Nowsaka K. Strength and Conditioning Biological Principles and Practical Applications. Wiley- Blackwell. 2011: 243 - 252 • Haff GG. The essentials of periodization. In Jeffreys I, and Moody J. Strength and Conditioning for Sports Performance. 2016. New York: Routledge. 404-448 • Almargro, BJ., Lopez PS., Moreno JA. Prediction of sport adherence through the influence of autonomy-support coaching among Spanish adolescent athletes. • Isoard-Gauteur S., Guillet-Descas E, Lemyre PN. Perceived Coaching Style and Burnout Propensity in High Level Young Athletes: Using a Self Determination Theory Perspective. • Ekstrand J, Lundqvist D, Lagerbäck L, et al. Is there a correlation between coaches’ leadership styles and injuries in elite football teams? A study of 36 elite teams in 17 countries. Br J Sports Med Published Online First: [Oct 22 2017]. doi:10.1136/ bjsports-2017-098001 • Mo%aghi M., Atarodi AA, Rohani Z. The Rela7onship Between Coaches and Athletes Compe77ve Anxiety and their Performance. Iran J Psychiatry Behav Sci, 2013 7(2), pp 68-76 Ramis Y., Torregrosa M., Viladrich C., Cruz J. The Effect of Coaches Controlling Style on the Compe77ve Anxiety of Young Athletes. Front Psychol. Apr 2017; 8: 572 • Hodge K., Lonsdale C. Prosocial and An7social Behavior in Sport: The Role of Coaching Style, Autonomous vs Controlled Mo7va7on and Morale Disengagement. J Sport & Ex Psychol, 2011, 33, 527-547 • Ryan RM., Deci EL. Self Determina7on Theory and the Facilita7on of Intrinsic Mo7va7on, Social Development, and Well-Being. American Psychologist. 2000 Jan 55(1), 68-78 • Mayer, D. M., Kuenzi, M., Greenbaum, R., Bardes, M., & Salvador, R. (2009). How low does ethical leadership flow? Test of a trickle-down model. • Merkel DL. Youth sport: posi7ve and nega7ve impact on young athletes. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 June; 4 151 -160
  38. 38. References 38 • Hart D, Carlo G. Moral Development in Adolescence. Journal of Research on Adolescence. 15 (3) 2005 • Wray-Lake, Syversten AK. The developmental roots of social responsibility in childhood and adolescence. 134 (2011) 2011 11 - 25 • Mcewen BS. Physiology and neurobiology of stress and adaptation: central role of the brain. 2007 Jul;87(3):873-904. • Schulk, J. Homeostasis, Allostasis, and the Cost of Physiological Adaptation. • Rottweger J. Bone Physiology. In Cardinale M, Newton R, Nosaka K, 2011. John Wiley & Sons: Oxford. 29-43 • Knapik, et al. Mechanosignaling in Bone Health, Trauma and Inflammation. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling Vol 20 (6) 2014. • Haff EG., Trippley NH. Essentials of Strength and Conditioning: 4th Edition. 2015. • Feely BT, Schiesel J., Agel J. Pitch Counts in Youth Baseball and Softball : A Historical Review. Clin J Sport Med. 2018 Jul. 28(4): 401 – 405 • Pytiak AV., et al. Are the Current Little League Pitching Guidelines Adequate? A Single Season Prospective MRI Study. Ortho J Sports Med. 2017 May 5(5) • Carey DL, et al. Training loads and injury risk in Australian football – different acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk. Br J Sports Med. 207 Aug; 51(16) • Rossi A., Effective injury forecasting in soccer with GPS training data and machine learning. PLoS One. 2018; 13(7) • Gabbett TJ, The training - injury prevention paradox: should athletes be training smarter and harder? Br J Sports Med. 2016. March, 50(5): 273 – 280 • Gabbet TJ, Jenkins DG. Relationship between training load and injury in professional rugby league players. J Sci Med Sport. 2011. May; 14(3): 204-209 • Hulin BT, Gabbet TJ, Lawson DW, et al. The acute: chronic workload ratio predicts injury: high chronic workload may decrease injury risk in elite rugby league players. Br J Sports Med. 2016. • Bourdon PC., et al. Monitoring Athlete Training Loads: A Consensus Statement. IJSPP. April 2017 12(2) S2-161-170 • Murray NB., et al. Calculating acute:chronic workload ratios using exponentially weighted moving averages provides a more sensitive indicator of injury likelihood than rolling averages • Rio E, Kidgell D, Moseley GL, et al. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review. Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 25 September 2015. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095215 • Chen YT, Tenforde AS, Fredericson M. Update on stress fractures in female athletes: epidemiology, treatment, and prevention. Curr Rev Musculoskeletal Med. 2013. 6:173-181 • Behrens SB., et al. Stress Fractures of the Pelvis and Legs in Athletes: A Review. Sports Health. 5(2): 165 - 174
  39. 39. References 39 • Astur DC, et al. Stress fractures: defini8on, diagnosis, and treatment. Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia. 2016; 51(1) Jan - Feb, 3-10 • Robertson GA, Wood AM. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Op8mising their management and outcome. World J Orthop. 2017. March 18(3): 242-255 • Lupien SJ, Juster RP, Raymond C, Marin MF. The Effects of Chronic Stress on the Human Brain: From Neurotoxicity to Vulnerability, to Opportunity. Front Neuroendocrinol. 2018 Feb 5 • McEwen BS. In pursuit of resilience: Stress, Epigene8cs, and Brain Plas8city. Acad Sci. 2016 Jun;1373(1):56-64. doi: 10.1111/nyas.13020. Epub 2016 Feb 25 • Lupien SJ, et al. Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behavior, and cogni8on. Nature Reviews Neuroscience Volume 10, pages434–445 (2009). • Mcewen, BS. Protec8ve and damaging effects of stress mediators: the central role of the brain. Clin Neurosci 2006 Dec; 8(4): 367 – 381 • Mcewen BS. Wingfield JC. The concept of allostasis in biology. Horm Behav. 2003 Jan;43(1):2- 15. • Nesse RM, Bhatnagar S, Young EA. Evolu8onary Origins and Func8ons of the Stress Response. Encyclopedia of Stress, Second Edi8on (2007), vol. 1, pp. 965-970 • Porges, S. The Polyvagal Theory: Neurophysiological Founda8ons of Emo8ons, Acachment, Communica8on, Self-Regula8on. 2011 • McMillian, F.D. “Stress, distress, and emo8on: dis8nc8ons and implica8ons for animal well-being. Mental Health and Well Being in Animals (Ames, Iowa: Iowa State Press) • Sapolsky, RM. Why Zebra’s Don’t Get Ulcers. W. H. Freeman. 2004 • Fink, G. Stress: Concepts, Cogni8on, Emo8on, and Behavior: Handbook of Stress Vol 1. Elsevier Inc., 2016. • Mcewen BS. Physiology and neurobiology of stress and adapta8on: central role of the brain. 2007 Jul;87(3):873-904. • Walker DL, Toufexis DJ, Davis M. Role of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis versus the amygdala in fear, stress, and anxiety. Eur J Pharmacol. 2003;463:199–216. • Walker DL, Miles LA, Davis M. Selec8ve par8cipa8on of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and CRF in sustained anxiety-like versus phasic fear-like responses. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2009; 33:1291–1308. • LeDoux J. Anxious: Using the Brain to Understand and Treat Fear and Anxiety. 2016. Penguin Books. • Sousa N, Cerqueira JJ, Almeida OF. Cor8costeroid receptors and neuroplas8city. Brain Res Rev. 2008;57:561–570. • McEwen BS. Protec8ve and damaging effects of stress mediators. N Engl J Med. 1998;338:171– 179. • McEwen BS, Wingfield JC. The concept of allostasis in biology and biomedicine. Horm Behav. 2003;43:2–15. • Fink, G. Stress: Neuroendocrinology and Neurobiology: Handbook of Stress Vol 2. Elsevier Inc. 2016
  40. 40. References 40 • Ekstrand J., et al. Is there a correlation between coaches leadership style and injuries in elite football teams? A study of 36 elite teams in 17 countries. Br J Sports Med 2018;52:527-531. • Gabbett TJ, Nassis GP, Oetter E, et al. The athlete monitoring cycle: a practical guide to interpreting and applying training monitoring data. Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 23 June 2017. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-097298 • Sands WA. Thinking sensibly about recovery. Strength and Conditioning for Sports Performance. Routledge. 2016; 451-483 • MacDougall D, Sale D. Neuromuscular Bases for Performance. In The Physiology of Training for High Performance. London: Oxford Press. 2014, 147 - 215 • Rainoldi, A., Gazzoni, M. Neuromuscular Physiology. In Cardinale M, Newton R, Nosaka K, 2011. John Wiley & Sons: Oxford. 17-27 • Maffuli, N. Tendon Physiology. In Cardinale M, Newton R, Nosaka K, 2011. John Wiley & Sons: Oxford. 45-53 • Thorpe RT., Atkinson G., Drust B., Gregson W. Monitoring Fatigue Status in Elite Sport Athletes: Implications for Practice. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2017 Apr;12(Suppl 2): S227-S234 • Gabbett TJ, Nassis GP, Oetter E, et al. The athlete monitoring cycle: a practical guide to interpreting and applying training monitoring data. Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 23 June 2017. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-097298 • Lee EC., Fragala MS., Kavouras SA., et al. Biomarkers in Sport and Exercise: Tracking Health, Performance, and Recovery in Athletes. J Strength Cond Res. 2017 Oct; 31(10): 2920 – 2937 • Robertson S., Barlett JD., Gastin PB. Red, Amber, or Green? Athlete Monitoring in Team Sport: The Need for Decision – Support Systems. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2017 Apr; 12 (Suppl 2): • Halson SL. Monitoring Train Load to Understand Fatigue in Athletes. Sports Med. 2014 44 (Suppl 2): S139 – 147 • Saw AE., Main LC., Gastin PB. Monitoring Athletes Through Self Report: Factors Influencing Implementation. J Sports Sci Med. 2015 Mar; 14(1): 137 - 146 • Bergeron MF. The young athlete: challenges of growth, development, and society. Curr Sports med Rep. 2010 Nov-Dec; 9(6): 356 – 368 • Brown KA., Patel DR., Darmawan D. Participation in sports in relation to adolescent growth anddevelopment. Transl Pediatr. 2017 Jul; 6(3): 150 – 159 • Roemmich JN., Rogol AD. Physiology of growth and development. Its relationship to performance in the young athlete. Clin Sports Med. 1995 Jul; 14(3): 483 – 502 • Baxter-Jones AD., Helms P., Maffulli N., et al. Growth and development of male gymnasts, swimmers, soccer and tennis players: a longitudinal study. Ann Hum Biol. 1995 Sep- Oct;22(5):381-94.
  41. 41. Thank You! Questions? Post in The Hero Lab Discussion Group or email dave@shiftmovementscience.com
  42. 42. Tracking and Monitoring in Gymnastics Daily, Weekly, Monthly, and Yearly Ideas for Gymnasts 42 By Dr. Dave Tilley DPT, SCS, CSCS
  43. 43. Why is Tracking and Monitoring Important in Gymnastics? 43 1. We work with kids! 2. This sport is hard. 3. Health à Great Humans à Great Gymnasts 4. Early specialization 5. Year round training 6. Workloads will likely become gold standard
  44. 44. We work with kids… 44 Reality vs Expectation
  45. 45. But we work with kids… 45 • Practical implementation is tough • Plus information overload on internet • Initial investment of time, implementation and “trial by fire” is a pain • BUT after a month the return on investment is simply invaluable
  46. 46. Benefits >>> Initial Headaches 46 Teach the gymnasts we work with to be accountable for their gymnas8cs, their health, and their training Helps foster a very great line of communica8on, and helps build trust/rapport with athletes Insane to look at data once you get a month or two’s worth Helps to change, 8nker, add new, subtract training loads
  47. 47. 47 Total Stress Emotional Mental Physical
  48. 48. 48 Sales Physical Mental Emotional Reserve “The Human Bank Account” Analogy Withdrawals (Stressors) Mental Stress Emotional Stress Physical Stress Stress
  49. 49. 49 Recover “The Human Bank Account” Analogy Deposits (Recovery) Time Sleep Hydration Nutrition Activities That Decompress Sales Physical Mental Emotional Reserve
  50. 50. 50 Monitor Tracking and Monitoring = Checkbook / Bank Log “What’s the cost of doing business?” - Are the athletes trending upward or downward? “Can I afford this?” – Should we push training or dial back today?
  51. 51. 51 Cultures, Values, Habits Ideal Work to Rest Ratios Plan Stress Recover “Tinker” Monitoring
  52. 52. 52 Plan Gabbett (2018) in Evidenced Based Strength and Conditioning by Turner and Comfort “Goldilocks and The Three Bears”
  53. 53. Helpful Ideas from Workload Research 53 1. The inverted “U Curve” and fitness bring protec<ve. Plan - Gymnastics “Sweet Spot” Under Prepared Over Taxed Research Articles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-29
  54. 54. 54 2. “The journey is more important than the destination” Plan - Gymnastics Helpful Ideas from Workload Research Research Articles/Books : 1,6, 19, 25-31 Spike Gradual
  55. 55. 55 Yearly Monthly Weekly Daily • In Depth Screening • Meta Goals • Periodization Models • Macro Goals • Forecasts/Review • Micro Goals • Check Ins • Planning/Tracking
  56. 56. Daily - What do we want insight into? 1. Gymnas4cs “Habit” Goals 2. External Loads – things we can measure objec4vely or count, etc (# landings, 4me on event_ 3. Internal Loads – individual responses to external load … gets a liLle trickier 4. Sparks of injury with early detec4on
  57. 57. Daily - What do we want insight into? Helps us “peak” into how the athlete is coping or responding to training physical, mental, emotional
  58. 58. Daily • Resting heart rate : marker for nervous system • Soreness 1-10 : physical strain measure • Fatigue 1-10 : global strain measure • # hours sleep : window into recovery • Pain / Injury : early detection • Overall mood : Perceived state
  59. 59. Weekly 1. Gymnastics Micro Goals 2. Cumulative emotional, mental, physical stress via journaling 3. Pain or start of injury
  60. 60. Monthly Growth • Standing – Total leg and torso growth • Sitting – Subtract from standing for torso and leg growth independently • Wingspan – looks at arm growth
  61. 61. Monthly - What do we want insight into? • Gymnas2cs “Micro” Goals • Growth • developmental age (over chronological age) • Rapid growth – at risk for overuse injury, loss in performance, mental/emo2onal stress • Journaling or Mood • Internal load trends
  62. 62. Biannually / Annually • “Year In Review” • Athletes • Coaches • Parents • Movement Screens • Ideally by coach and medical together • Medical Assessments
  63. 63. Biannually / Annually • Movement Screens • Ideally by coach and medical together • Medical Assessments
  64. 64. Movement Screen Highlights
  65. 65. Keys to Successfully Implementing Tracking/Monitoring • Must have open communication and regular check ins 128-129 • Athlete physical, mental, emotional well being • Factors related to individual gymnastics and growth profiles
  66. 66. Three REALLY Valuable Books on This 71
  67. 67. 72
  68. 68. References
  69. 69. References
  70. 70. References
  71. 71. Thank You! Questions? Post in The Hero Lab Discussion Group or email dave@shiftmovementscience.com

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