Teamwork4_LSC_WB_25803 (2).pdf

areh

Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books
Unit 1, page 15 (CD 5, Track 01)
1	
Before they had cars, people used to use trains for
long-distance travel.
2 Did Queen Elizabeth I rule England for 45 years?
3 In the eighteenth century, people didn’t use to catch a flight.
4 Discovering America changed history.
5 I didn’t get around New York by car.
Unit 1, page 17 (CD 5, Track 02)
Alan:	
Hello, welcome to the transport history podcast with
Alan and Becky. Today we’re going to talk about
rickshaws.
Becky:	
What’s a rickshaw, Alan? Maybe some of our listeners
don’t know.
Alan:	
A rickshaw is a light cart with two wheels and no doors,
but instead of an animal pulling the cart, it’s a person.
Becky: It was invented in China, right?
Alan:	
Actually, Japan. A man called Izuni Yosuke designed
the first rickshaw in 1869. In fact, the word “rickshaw”
comes from the Japanese word jinrikisha, meaning
human-powered vehicle.
Becky: 
Uh, Alan, silly question, but why didn’t people use
horses?
Alan:	
In the 19th century, only the army used horses in Japan.
Also, using humans was cheaper than using animals.
Rickshaws soon became a popular way to get around
cities in India and China, too, and being a rickshaw
puller was a real profession.
Becky: Gosh! It doesn’t sound like a pleasant job.
Alan:	
It wasn’t. The conditions were horrible. People used to
call them human horses. They used to work long hours
with low pay. Not only that, but they sometimes pulled
carts at 8 kilometres an hour for over 32 kilometres
a day. Can you imagine! They also used to eat and sleep
in their rickshaws.
Becky: Do people still do this job today? Surely not!
Alan:	
Well, the development of public transport like buses and
the railway networks led to a decline in rickshaws. That
was around the end of the Second World War. But in
Calcutta, India, there are still around 20,000 rickshaw
pullers, or rickshawallas. People often use them during
the monsoons - that’s the rainy season. It rains a lot in
the monsoon season, and the rain makes it hard to move
around on foot.
Becky: So, I guess they can be quite useful.
Unit 2, page 24 (CD 5, Track 03)
1	
Young people today have got a different lifestyle than their
parents.
2	
Mary was helping refugees to settle down in Glasgow last
summer.
3	
Max was experiencing a lot of stress before his new friends
helped him deal with it.
4 It is important to support your friends when they need help.
5	
While you are studying abroad, it is important to adapt to the
local culture.
Unit 2, page 27 (CD 5, Track 04)
Shannon:	
Who are all these people in your holiday photos,
Tom?
Tom:	
Those are my cousins. They came to Spain with
my aunt and uncle. They live in Switzerland, so we
don’t see them very much. They arrived a day late
because their plane was delayed. My grandparents
came too.
Shannon: Did you all stay together in a hotel?
Tom:	
Well, Shannon, my grandparents suggested booking
into a hotel, but when we called the hotel, they
explained that it was high season and all the rooms
were full. My mum found a fabulous villa on the
website Airbnb. It even had a swimming pool.
Shannon:	
We also found a flat in Rome last year on Airbnb.
It wasn’t luxurious, but the area was great – full of
cafés and restaurants. Also, the owner of the flat
was very kind. He offered to take us on a tour
of Rome. I think he was looking for a chance to
practise his English!
Tom:	
Well, I managed to use my Spanish on holiday.
I don’t have many opportunities to speak Spanish,
so I really wanted to practise while I was in Spain.
Shannon:	
It looks like you managed it, Tom. You wrote
something in Spanish on Facebook. I had to use
Google Translate to understand it!
Tom:	
Oh, right, that photo! I took that photo while I was
hiking with my parents.
Unit 3, page 34 (CD 5, Track 05)
1	
She’s taken some incredible pictures of the wildlife in the
park.
2 We’ve just got out of the cave – it was amazing!
3 Have you raised enough money for your project?
4 He hasn’t succeeded in reaching the peak.
5 Have the students dug holes for planting the trees?
IH-015-744
1
WORKBOOK LISTENINGS
Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books
Unit 3, page 37 (CD 5, Track 06)
Interviewer:	
Hello, and welcome to What’s Up with the World?
Today, Professor Harry Smith is going to talk
about a new project to save water. Professor,
what’s it all about?
Professor:	
Well, the project is called Every Drop Counts and
we want to make everyone understand just how
valuable water is.
Interviewer: But 75% of our planet is covered in water.
Professor:	
That’s true. But 97% of all the water on Earth is
in our seas and oceans, and 2% is the ice
in glaciers. That leaves only about 1% in rivers
and lakes for us to use.
Interviewer: I see. So, there’s not a lot of water for drinking.
Professor:	
Many countries in Africa haven’t got enough
water to grow food. However, 60% of all fresh
water, the water we drink, is divided between only
ten countries. And the problem is getting worse.
Interviewer: And why is that?
Professor:	
Well, as the world’s population increases, there is
more demand for fresh water.
In addition, more of our lakes and rivers are
becoming polluted because of an increase in
industry and changes in modern agriculture.
Interviewer: So, what can we do about it?
Professor:	
Well, as a start Every Drop Counts is sending
people into every school in the country to talk
about the issue and to challenge everyone to try to
save water in their daily activities. There’s also
a competition to see which school can think of
the most ways of saving water.
Interviewer:	
That sounds like a great project: interesting and
fun. Thank you, Professor Smith.
Unit 4, page 45 (CD 5, Track 07)
1 John was blamed for breaking the laptop.
2 Mary was forgiven by her brother for eating all the cake.
3 Sam is allowed to drive his father’s car at the weekend.
4 Prayers are customary during religious festivals.
5 Kim was interested in investigating her roots.
Unit 4, page 47 (CD 5, Track 08)
Nadia: Have you finished your family roots project?
George:	
Not yet. I have to find out about my grandmother’s
parents.
Nadia: Your grandmother is from Jamaica, isn’t she?
George:	
Yes, my grandmother was a nurse, and she came to
England in 1963. At the time, Britain needed workers,
because there was a lot of damage to the country after
the Second World War.
Nadia: But the Second World War ended in 1945.
George:	
You’re right, but there was still a lot of work to be
done. Many people from the West Indies, including
countries like Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados, took
advantage of the opportunity for a better life. Nurses
were also invited to come here by the government –
there weren’t enough nurses in Britain. You see, during
the war, many British women became nurses. But after
the war, they went back to their families.
Nadia: Did your grandmother come on her own?
George: Yes, and she was only 19!
Nadia: Wow, she probably felt really lonely.
George:	
For a while, she did. Her life wasn’t easy.
Nadia: How did she deal with it?
George:	
She didn’t give up. She made friends with people at
the hospital, and she joined a local church too –
actually, that’s where she met my grandad! In my
opinion, she worked really hard and made a meaningful
life for herself in the UK.
Unit 5, page 54 (CD 5, Track 09)
1	
According to the weather forecast, temperatures will drop
to -5°.
2 The weather will be mild, so we’re going hiking tomorrow.
3	
If lions didn’t teach their young to hunt, they wouldn’t
survive.
4 We won’t go camping if it is boiling hot.
5 Unless the predator catches its prey, it will remain hungry.
workbook
listenings
2
Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books
Unit 5, page 57 (CD 5, Track 10)
Sara:	
Good morning, listeners. This morning, we’re
going to speak with Dr Bradley Hinds, director of
the National Aquarium. He’s going to tell us about
singing fish. Dr Hinds, would you please explain?
Dr Hinds:	
Of course, Sara. Well, I should start by thanking
marine biologist Rob McCauley for his discovery.
For 30 years, he has studied the sounds of fish using
recordings. He’s discovered that fish communicate
using song.
Sara:	
Just like birds! Do they also sing at sunrise and
sunset?
Dr Hinds:	
Actually, they’re different to birds in that way. Most
fish start singing just after sunset and continue until
the middle of the night.
Sara: And do they sing for a specific reason?
Dr Hinds:	
Yes, the main one is to find a mate. For example, the
Terapontidae, a small fish with stripes on its body,
has got a special mating call. These fish are only
about 15 centimetres long, so they don’t look like
they can make a loud noise. But when all the fish
sing together, they can attract fish over one kilometre
away!
Sara: Wow, that’s amazing! So, why else do they sing?
Dr Hinds:	
Some fish sing when they’re hunting prey. If the
water isn’t clear, using sound will make it easier to
stay together while hunting. They will also make
noises if they feel threatened by other fish.
Sara: 	
How did the scientists record the fish?
Dr Hinds:	
In the 1980s, McCauley put a microphone in the
water. He could only lower it 20 metres for a short
time. Now, however, the equipment can stay in the
water all year round. It also goes down to 4,000
metres – all the way to the bottom of the ocean.
Sara:	
I’m sure there will be many more interesting
discoveries in the future. Thank you, Dr Hinds.
Unit 6, page 64 (CD 5, Track 11)
1 She said that she couldn’t afford to buy a new car.
2 Dad said that I had to delete that photo.
3	
Brenda said that she would upload the video clip the
following day.
4	
Fran said that she was getting a lot of compliments on her
outfit.
5 My friend said that those hoodies were inexpensive.
Unit 6, page 67 (CD 5, Track 12)
Presenter:	Today on Fashion FM, we’re interviewing teenagers
about their clothes and what has influenced their
style. James is talking to three very differently
dressed young people, Danny, Chantelle and Katrin.
James:	
So Danny, tell us a bit about what you’re wearing.
Danny:	
No problem. I’m wearing an old pair of jeans from
a second-hand shop on Burton Road and a black
T-shirt with a picture of my favourite band – Iron
Maiden. If it gets chilly later, I’ll put on my hoodie.
James:	
Before the interview, Danny, you said that you were
on your way home from skateboarding. Does this
sport have an influence on what you wear?
Danny:	
When I’m skateboarding, I have to wear practical
clothes. I go skateboarding a few times a week, but
I suppose that I wear the skateboarding style every
day.
James: Thanks, Danny. What about you, Chantelle?
Chantelle:	
I’m wearing jeans, a plain white T-shirt and a big
black jacket. But my trainers are the most important
part of my outfit. Today, I’m wearing these bright
pink ones, but I’ve got a selection at home.
James:	
You told us that you liked a type of music called
grime. How does that influence you?
Chantelle:	
Well, people into grime music wear casual sports
clothes. To get the style right, your trainers have to
be the right brand.
James:	
OK. Let’s move on to Katrin. Katrin, if someone
asked you to describe your style, what would you
say?
Katrin:	
For me, it’s important to be stylish. I follow the
videos of the Italian fashion influencer Chiara
Ferragni. I like to get ideas from her posts. But
I don’t wear clothes just because they suit an
Instagram model or another social media influencer.
I have to be realistic about how they will look on me
before I spend my money.
Unit 7, page 74 (CD 5, Track 13)
1 We live in a house which is made of red brick.
2 Have you read the document which I attached to the e-mail?
3 Is there anyone here who knows how to operate this machine?
4 We walked in the park that surrounds the place.
5 This is the place where they are putting up an office block.
workbook
listenings
3
Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books
Unit 7, page 77 (CD 5, Track 14)
Jack:	Welcome to Hollyroad Academy Radio. I’m Jack Roberts,
and today we’re starting a new podcast series called What
We Collect. Fran Simpson is our first guest. She’s shaking
a glass ball. It looks like there’s a house and snow inside.
Fran, can you tell our listeners what you’re holding?
Fran:	
Hi, Jack. This is a snow globe from a famous factory in
Vienna.
Jack:	
My grandma gave me a snow globe years ago. I dropped it,
and all the water spilled out. We’re lucky my dog didn’t
drink it. I read a warning on a website which said there
can be dangerous chemicals in the water.
Fran:	
Yes, that’s true. Some snow globes have got harmful
chemicals. But this particular one is from the original
Vienna snow globe factory. The snow globes produced in
this factory have got nothing harmful in them. The water
inside comes from the Alpine Mountains.
Jack:	
Really? Are they expensive?
Fran:	
Yes, they are, because they’re handmade. But what’s
interesting is the history of the snow globe. Erwin Perzy,
the man who invented the snow globe, wasn’t an inventor
of toys at all – he was a mechanic.
Jack:So how did he think of the idea?
Fran:	
Well, a doctor who performed operations asked him to
improve the brightness of his light bulb. Perzy attempted
to help him by taking an idea from shoemakers. They
used to fill glass globes with water and put them in front
of candles to create bigger, stronger lights. However,
Perzy found that this didn’t work with electric light bulbs.
So, he filled glass globes with water, and then he put baby
food into the water. He thought that the light would be
brighter if there were a substance inside the water. That’s
when Perzy realised that it looked like snow.
Jack:So, creating a toy wasn’t actually his aim.
Fran:Not at all, it was just a successful accident!
Unit 8, page 84 (CD 5, Track 15)
1 Actors must learn their roles be heart.
2 I’m sure she can cope with the problem.
3 I couldn’t recall how the accident happened.
4 The treatment may upset you at first.
5 You should try to get over your fear.
Unit 8, page 87 (CD 5, Track 16)
Reece: Hey, Jasmine, what are you doing?
Jasmine:	
I’m trying to learn my French vocabulary, but I’m
really struggling. I’ve got a list of 30 words that
I have to learn by heart. I must write and say the
words in French. I really don’t think I can do it.
Reece: Have you tried different techniques?
Jasmine:	
Like writing the words hundreds of times or drawing
pictures of the meanings? Yes, I even thought about
writing songs or poems with them.
Reece:	
Well, don’t give up. I’ve got one more idea, and
I think it’ll work. Have you heard of the Crazy
English method?
Jasmine: No. Reece, I’m not learning English vocabulary …
Reece:	
I know that! Just listen! Crazy English is a very
common method used in China to learn English. It
was started by someone called Li Yang. Li was really
shy – and whenever he wanted to speak in English,
the words just wouldn’t come out. So he started
repeating the words loudly over and over again. After
four months, his exam results really improved. He
graduated as an electrical engineer, but he left his job
to open his own English school.
Jasmine: Did he succeed?
Reece:	
Yes. Today, Li Yang teaches thousands of people. He
was even asked by the Chinese government to teach
English to the army! Now, he’s a very rich man.
Jasmine: But how will shouting the words help me?
Reece:	
It’s something to do with muscles in your mouth and
how they connect to the brain. I suppose that learning
a language is like riding a bike. We have to repeat the
movements of the muscles to remember them.
Jasmine: Is there any scientific proof that this method helps?
Reece:	
Well, a study was done recently which showed that
reading aloud helps you recall information. So, I guess
that making even more noise could be even better!
Unit 9, page 94 (CD 5, Track 17)
1 Who is the most gorgeous actor, in your opinion?
2 Linda is not as gifted in music as her mother.
3 The cat’s fur is softer than the dog’s.
4 If you’re determined enough, you will succeed.
5	
There are several good students in the class, but Cathy
is the brightest.
workbook
listenings
4
Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books
Unit 9, page 97 (CD 5, Track 18)
Anna: David, can you help me fill in this mini-questionnaire?
David: Of course, Anna. What’s it for?
Anna:	
It’s for my psychology lesson. I have to write my
strengths here and my weaknesses there.
David:	
OK. Well, I think you’re extremely well-liked – that’s
definitely one of your strongest points.
Oh, and you’re extremely bright …
Anna: Oh, thanks … . What about my weaknesses?
David: I think YOU should answer that!
Anna:	
Well, I wouldn’t say that I’m a natural leader.
Remember when Mrs Jones made me captain
of the basketball team? Brenda ended up taking control.
David:	
All right, next question. What’s your biggest
achievement?
Anna: I once won a photography prize.
David: Your photos are on Instagram. They’re brilliant.
Anna:	
Thanks, David. My photos aren’t bad, but I’d like to
improve them.
David:	
So, I suppose we can write this under the question
“a skill which you want to develop”. And what would
you like to change about yourself?
Anna:	
I’m mostly quite happy with myself, but I’m sometimes
too shy. I’d like to be a bit more outgoing. Oh, and
I think I’m not organised enough. I should learn how
to organise my time better.
David: OK, so that’s it. I hope I’ve helped.
Anna:	
You have. Thanks, David.
workbook
listenings
5

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Teamwork4_LSC_WB_25803 (2).pdf

  • 1. Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books Unit 1, page 15 (CD 5, Track 01) 1 Before they had cars, people used to use trains for long-distance travel. 2 Did Queen Elizabeth I rule England for 45 years? 3 In the eighteenth century, people didn’t use to catch a flight. 4 Discovering America changed history. 5 I didn’t get around New York by car. Unit 1, page 17 (CD 5, Track 02) Alan: Hello, welcome to the transport history podcast with Alan and Becky. Today we’re going to talk about rickshaws. Becky: What’s a rickshaw, Alan? Maybe some of our listeners don’t know. Alan: A rickshaw is a light cart with two wheels and no doors, but instead of an animal pulling the cart, it’s a person. Becky: It was invented in China, right? Alan: Actually, Japan. A man called Izuni Yosuke designed the first rickshaw in 1869. In fact, the word “rickshaw” comes from the Japanese word jinrikisha, meaning human-powered vehicle. Becky: Uh, Alan, silly question, but why didn’t people use horses? Alan: In the 19th century, only the army used horses in Japan. Also, using humans was cheaper than using animals. Rickshaws soon became a popular way to get around cities in India and China, too, and being a rickshaw puller was a real profession. Becky: Gosh! It doesn’t sound like a pleasant job. Alan: It wasn’t. The conditions were horrible. People used to call them human horses. They used to work long hours with low pay. Not only that, but they sometimes pulled carts at 8 kilometres an hour for over 32 kilometres a day. Can you imagine! They also used to eat and sleep in their rickshaws. Becky: Do people still do this job today? Surely not! Alan: Well, the development of public transport like buses and the railway networks led to a decline in rickshaws. That was around the end of the Second World War. But in Calcutta, India, there are still around 20,000 rickshaw pullers, or rickshawallas. People often use them during the monsoons - that’s the rainy season. It rains a lot in the monsoon season, and the rain makes it hard to move around on foot. Becky: So, I guess they can be quite useful. Unit 2, page 24 (CD 5, Track 03) 1 Young people today have got a different lifestyle than their parents. 2 Mary was helping refugees to settle down in Glasgow last summer. 3 Max was experiencing a lot of stress before his new friends helped him deal with it. 4 It is important to support your friends when they need help. 5 While you are studying abroad, it is important to adapt to the local culture. Unit 2, page 27 (CD 5, Track 04) Shannon: Who are all these people in your holiday photos, Tom? Tom: Those are my cousins. They came to Spain with my aunt and uncle. They live in Switzerland, so we don’t see them very much. They arrived a day late because their plane was delayed. My grandparents came too. Shannon: Did you all stay together in a hotel? Tom: Well, Shannon, my grandparents suggested booking into a hotel, but when we called the hotel, they explained that it was high season and all the rooms were full. My mum found a fabulous villa on the website Airbnb. It even had a swimming pool. Shannon: We also found a flat in Rome last year on Airbnb. It wasn’t luxurious, but the area was great – full of cafés and restaurants. Also, the owner of the flat was very kind. He offered to take us on a tour of Rome. I think he was looking for a chance to practise his English! Tom: Well, I managed to use my Spanish on holiday. I don’t have many opportunities to speak Spanish, so I really wanted to practise while I was in Spain. Shannon: It looks like you managed it, Tom. You wrote something in Spanish on Facebook. I had to use Google Translate to understand it! Tom: Oh, right, that photo! I took that photo while I was hiking with my parents. Unit 3, page 34 (CD 5, Track 05) 1 She’s taken some incredible pictures of the wildlife in the park. 2 We’ve just got out of the cave – it was amazing! 3 Have you raised enough money for your project? 4 He hasn’t succeeded in reaching the peak. 5 Have the students dug holes for planting the trees? IH-015-744 1 WORKBOOK LISTENINGS
  • 2. Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books Unit 3, page 37 (CD 5, Track 06) Interviewer: Hello, and welcome to What’s Up with the World? Today, Professor Harry Smith is going to talk about a new project to save water. Professor, what’s it all about? Professor: Well, the project is called Every Drop Counts and we want to make everyone understand just how valuable water is. Interviewer: But 75% of our planet is covered in water. Professor: That’s true. But 97% of all the water on Earth is in our seas and oceans, and 2% is the ice in glaciers. That leaves only about 1% in rivers and lakes for us to use. Interviewer: I see. So, there’s not a lot of water for drinking. Professor: Many countries in Africa haven’t got enough water to grow food. However, 60% of all fresh water, the water we drink, is divided between only ten countries. And the problem is getting worse. Interviewer: And why is that? Professor: Well, as the world’s population increases, there is more demand for fresh water. In addition, more of our lakes and rivers are becoming polluted because of an increase in industry and changes in modern agriculture. Interviewer: So, what can we do about it? Professor: Well, as a start Every Drop Counts is sending people into every school in the country to talk about the issue and to challenge everyone to try to save water in their daily activities. There’s also a competition to see which school can think of the most ways of saving water. Interviewer: That sounds like a great project: interesting and fun. Thank you, Professor Smith. Unit 4, page 45 (CD 5, Track 07) 1 John was blamed for breaking the laptop. 2 Mary was forgiven by her brother for eating all the cake. 3 Sam is allowed to drive his father’s car at the weekend. 4 Prayers are customary during religious festivals. 5 Kim was interested in investigating her roots. Unit 4, page 47 (CD 5, Track 08) Nadia: Have you finished your family roots project? George: Not yet. I have to find out about my grandmother’s parents. Nadia: Your grandmother is from Jamaica, isn’t she? George: Yes, my grandmother was a nurse, and she came to England in 1963. At the time, Britain needed workers, because there was a lot of damage to the country after the Second World War. Nadia: But the Second World War ended in 1945. George: You’re right, but there was still a lot of work to be done. Many people from the West Indies, including countries like Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados, took advantage of the opportunity for a better life. Nurses were also invited to come here by the government – there weren’t enough nurses in Britain. You see, during the war, many British women became nurses. But after the war, they went back to their families. Nadia: Did your grandmother come on her own? George: Yes, and she was only 19! Nadia: Wow, she probably felt really lonely. George: For a while, she did. Her life wasn’t easy. Nadia: How did she deal with it? George: She didn’t give up. She made friends with people at the hospital, and she joined a local church too – actually, that’s where she met my grandad! In my opinion, she worked really hard and made a meaningful life for herself in the UK. Unit 5, page 54 (CD 5, Track 09) 1 According to the weather forecast, temperatures will drop to -5°. 2 The weather will be mild, so we’re going hiking tomorrow. 3 If lions didn’t teach their young to hunt, they wouldn’t survive. 4 We won’t go camping if it is boiling hot. 5 Unless the predator catches its prey, it will remain hungry. workbook listenings 2
  • 3. Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books Unit 5, page 57 (CD 5, Track 10) Sara: Good morning, listeners. This morning, we’re going to speak with Dr Bradley Hinds, director of the National Aquarium. He’s going to tell us about singing fish. Dr Hinds, would you please explain? Dr Hinds: Of course, Sara. Well, I should start by thanking marine biologist Rob McCauley for his discovery. For 30 years, he has studied the sounds of fish using recordings. He’s discovered that fish communicate using song. Sara: Just like birds! Do they also sing at sunrise and sunset? Dr Hinds: Actually, they’re different to birds in that way. Most fish start singing just after sunset and continue until the middle of the night. Sara: And do they sing for a specific reason? Dr Hinds: Yes, the main one is to find a mate. For example, the Terapontidae, a small fish with stripes on its body, has got a special mating call. These fish are only about 15 centimetres long, so they don’t look like they can make a loud noise. But when all the fish sing together, they can attract fish over one kilometre away! Sara: Wow, that’s amazing! So, why else do they sing? Dr Hinds: Some fish sing when they’re hunting prey. If the water isn’t clear, using sound will make it easier to stay together while hunting. They will also make noises if they feel threatened by other fish. Sara: How did the scientists record the fish? Dr Hinds: In the 1980s, McCauley put a microphone in the water. He could only lower it 20 metres for a short time. Now, however, the equipment can stay in the water all year round. It also goes down to 4,000 metres – all the way to the bottom of the ocean. Sara: I’m sure there will be many more interesting discoveries in the future. Thank you, Dr Hinds. Unit 6, page 64 (CD 5, Track 11) 1 She said that she couldn’t afford to buy a new car. 2 Dad said that I had to delete that photo. 3 Brenda said that she would upload the video clip the following day. 4 Fran said that she was getting a lot of compliments on her outfit. 5 My friend said that those hoodies were inexpensive. Unit 6, page 67 (CD 5, Track 12) Presenter: Today on Fashion FM, we’re interviewing teenagers about their clothes and what has influenced their style. James is talking to three very differently dressed young people, Danny, Chantelle and Katrin. James: So Danny, tell us a bit about what you’re wearing. Danny: No problem. I’m wearing an old pair of jeans from a second-hand shop on Burton Road and a black T-shirt with a picture of my favourite band – Iron Maiden. If it gets chilly later, I’ll put on my hoodie. James: Before the interview, Danny, you said that you were on your way home from skateboarding. Does this sport have an influence on what you wear? Danny: When I’m skateboarding, I have to wear practical clothes. I go skateboarding a few times a week, but I suppose that I wear the skateboarding style every day. James: Thanks, Danny. What about you, Chantelle? Chantelle: I’m wearing jeans, a plain white T-shirt and a big black jacket. But my trainers are the most important part of my outfit. Today, I’m wearing these bright pink ones, but I’ve got a selection at home. James: You told us that you liked a type of music called grime. How does that influence you? Chantelle: Well, people into grime music wear casual sports clothes. To get the style right, your trainers have to be the right brand. James: OK. Let’s move on to Katrin. Katrin, if someone asked you to describe your style, what would you say? Katrin: For me, it’s important to be stylish. I follow the videos of the Italian fashion influencer Chiara Ferragni. I like to get ideas from her posts. But I don’t wear clothes just because they suit an Instagram model or another social media influencer. I have to be realistic about how they will look on me before I spend my money. Unit 7, page 74 (CD 5, Track 13) 1 We live in a house which is made of red brick. 2 Have you read the document which I attached to the e-mail? 3 Is there anyone here who knows how to operate this machine? 4 We walked in the park that surrounds the place. 5 This is the place where they are putting up an office block. workbook listenings 3
  • 4. Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books Unit 7, page 77 (CD 5, Track 14) Jack: Welcome to Hollyroad Academy Radio. I’m Jack Roberts, and today we’re starting a new podcast series called What We Collect. Fran Simpson is our first guest. She’s shaking a glass ball. It looks like there’s a house and snow inside. Fran, can you tell our listeners what you’re holding? Fran: Hi, Jack. This is a snow globe from a famous factory in Vienna. Jack: My grandma gave me a snow globe years ago. I dropped it, and all the water spilled out. We’re lucky my dog didn’t drink it. I read a warning on a website which said there can be dangerous chemicals in the water. Fran: Yes, that’s true. Some snow globes have got harmful chemicals. But this particular one is from the original Vienna snow globe factory. The snow globes produced in this factory have got nothing harmful in them. The water inside comes from the Alpine Mountains. Jack: Really? Are they expensive? Fran: Yes, they are, because they’re handmade. But what’s interesting is the history of the snow globe. Erwin Perzy, the man who invented the snow globe, wasn’t an inventor of toys at all – he was a mechanic. Jack:So how did he think of the idea? Fran: Well, a doctor who performed operations asked him to improve the brightness of his light bulb. Perzy attempted to help him by taking an idea from shoemakers. They used to fill glass globes with water and put them in front of candles to create bigger, stronger lights. However, Perzy found that this didn’t work with electric light bulbs. So, he filled glass globes with water, and then he put baby food into the water. He thought that the light would be brighter if there were a substance inside the water. That’s when Perzy realised that it looked like snow. Jack:So, creating a toy wasn’t actually his aim. Fran:Not at all, it was just a successful accident! Unit 8, page 84 (CD 5, Track 15) 1 Actors must learn their roles be heart. 2 I’m sure she can cope with the problem. 3 I couldn’t recall how the accident happened. 4 The treatment may upset you at first. 5 You should try to get over your fear. Unit 8, page 87 (CD 5, Track 16) Reece: Hey, Jasmine, what are you doing? Jasmine: I’m trying to learn my French vocabulary, but I’m really struggling. I’ve got a list of 30 words that I have to learn by heart. I must write and say the words in French. I really don’t think I can do it. Reece: Have you tried different techniques? Jasmine: Like writing the words hundreds of times or drawing pictures of the meanings? Yes, I even thought about writing songs or poems with them. Reece: Well, don’t give up. I’ve got one more idea, and I think it’ll work. Have you heard of the Crazy English method? Jasmine: No. Reece, I’m not learning English vocabulary … Reece: I know that! Just listen! Crazy English is a very common method used in China to learn English. It was started by someone called Li Yang. Li was really shy – and whenever he wanted to speak in English, the words just wouldn’t come out. So he started repeating the words loudly over and over again. After four months, his exam results really improved. He graduated as an electrical engineer, but he left his job to open his own English school. Jasmine: Did he succeed? Reece: Yes. Today, Li Yang teaches thousands of people. He was even asked by the Chinese government to teach English to the army! Now, he’s a very rich man. Jasmine: But how will shouting the words help me? Reece: It’s something to do with muscles in your mouth and how they connect to the brain. I suppose that learning a language is like riding a bike. We have to repeat the movements of the muscles to remember them. Jasmine: Is there any scientific proof that this method helps? Reece: Well, a study was done recently which showed that reading aloud helps you recall information. So, I guess that making even more noise could be even better! Unit 9, page 94 (CD 5, Track 17) 1 Who is the most gorgeous actor, in your opinion? 2 Linda is not as gifted in music as her mother. 3 The cat’s fur is softer than the dog’s. 4 If you’re determined enough, you will succeed. 5 There are several good students in the class, but Cathy is the brightest. workbook listenings 4
  • 5. Teamwork ESO 4 Photocopiable ©B Burlington Books Unit 9, page 97 (CD 5, Track 18) Anna: David, can you help me fill in this mini-questionnaire? David: Of course, Anna. What’s it for? Anna: It’s for my psychology lesson. I have to write my strengths here and my weaknesses there. David: OK. Well, I think you’re extremely well-liked – that’s definitely one of your strongest points. Oh, and you’re extremely bright … Anna: Oh, thanks … . What about my weaknesses? David: I think YOU should answer that! Anna: Well, I wouldn’t say that I’m a natural leader. Remember when Mrs Jones made me captain of the basketball team? Brenda ended up taking control. David: All right, next question. What’s your biggest achievement? Anna: I once won a photography prize. David: Your photos are on Instagram. They’re brilliant. Anna: Thanks, David. My photos aren’t bad, but I’d like to improve them. David: So, I suppose we can write this under the question “a skill which you want to develop”. And what would you like to change about yourself? Anna: I’m mostly quite happy with myself, but I’m sometimes too shy. I’d like to be a bit more outgoing. Oh, and I think I’m not organised enough. I should learn how to organise my time better. David: OK, so that’s it. I hope I’ve helped. Anna: You have. Thanks, David. workbook listenings 5