Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

How to build & grow online communities: with Tom Diederich

232 visualizaciones

Publicado el

I created this presentation to highlight some of the milestones in my career as an online community builder over the past 15 years. I hope it can also help other community managers and executives tasked with building and/or growing an online community.

This talk includes
* Tips for building and growing a new community from scratch
* Tips for resurrecting a floundering community
* How to connect Support to your community via Slack and other social tools
* The perks of a social listening program
* How to turn social rants into customer service tickets
* The importance of gamification
* And much more!

My name is Tom Diederich and this presentation is a timeline of sorts highlighting my experiences in the field of online community management, which started in 2005 when I joined an internal team at Intuit that created one of the world’s first online customer communities – a forums-based question-and-answer space for TurboTax customers.

The following year, I took everything I learned in that project and joined Symantec -- then the third-largest software company in the world -- where I assembled a nimble team of three and together we designed, launched and managed the organization’s first social media presence and online community in 2006. Yes, I am proud to say that I was Symantec's first community manager and first social media strategist.

I’ve been building and managing large corporate communities ever since. I hope this deck helps you in your work with online communities. Please feel free to contact if you'd like to ask any questions, etc.

Publicado en: Internet
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

How to build & grow online communities: with Tom Diederich

  1. 1. Hello!
  2. 2. How to build & grow a new community 1) Start small: Focus on a specific goal (such as creating a peer-to-peer support forum). 2) Design with potential members in mind: Consider your potential members’ motivations and interests as you build spaces for interaction. 3) Prevent anonymity: Require people to register and log-in before participating in the conversation. 4) First impressions are important: Seed the community with members, groups, activities, and content before launching. 5) Get early buy-in from internal influencers: Recruit a business sponsor who can maneuver within the organization, maintain key relationships, and secure resources. 6) Incorporate gamification to incentivize activity. 7) Designate a full-time community manager. 8) Plan for growth: Identify the mechanisms (in both process and technology) that will enable the community to expand smoothly. 9) Evolve organically: Leave room for unintended positive developments, such as member groups that emerge from the ground up. 10) Make it easy to register: Make the commitment small -- don’t ask for too much personal information up-front. 11) Connect to the outside world: Link to related sites and articles, and keep members informed about conferences and events. 12) Create a super-user program. In time, you’ll identify & invite the most active members. How to build & grow a new community 1) Start small: Focus on a specific goal (such as creating a peer-to-peer support forum). 2) Design with potential members in mind: Consider your potential members’ motivations and interests as you build spaces for interaction. 3) Prevent anonymity: Require people to register and log-in before participating in the conversation. 4) First impressions are important: Seed the community with members, groups, activities, and content before launching. 5) Get early buy-in from internal influencers: Recruit a business sponsor who can maneuver within the organization, maintain key relationships, and secure resources. 6) Incorporate gamification to incentivize activity. 7) Designate a full-time community manager. 8) Plan for growth: Identify the mechanisms (in both process and technology) that will enable the community to expand smoothly. 9) Evolve organically: Leave room for unintended positive developments, such as member groups that emerge from the ground up. 10) Make it easy to register: Make the commitment small -- don’t ask for too much personal information up-front. 11) Connect to the outside world: Link to related sites and articles, and keep members informed about conferences and events. 12) Create a super-user program. In time, you’ll identify & invite the most active members.
  3. 3. GridGain support forums (2019) • Launched June 2019 (Higher Logic) • Gamification rewards engagement • Nucleus for downloads; release notes & news • Slack, email integration makes participation easy • Event registration simplified (SSO) • Forums-focused search to find answers fast • Hub for meetup news & discussions • Intuitive dropdown navigation • Connections option for networking
  4. 4. Case study (2008): Cadence Design Systems • Created community from scratch in 2008 on Telligent platform. Customers told us they wanted a mailing list/forums & blog only. We simplified our plans as a result. • Promotion of your new community is key. At Cadence, we put the community front and center on cadence.com! Yes, directly on the homepage. • I promoted the new community at local user group meetings, other events, newsletter blasts, a PR campaign, blog posts and social media campaigns. • I looked at blogs in a new way: treating them like a newspaper with an editorial calendar and “sections” (categories). • Blogger Bootcamp: I created a workshop to turn engineers into content creators. About 1 in 10 become regular contributors. • I invited existing customers who had volunteered for user experience studies to join an early pilot program. They seeded the forums with answers to commonly asked support questions and more.
  5. 5. How to grow an existing community Planting the seeds = Promotion!!! ü Measured ü Prioritized ü Effective
  6. 6. Starting from scratch – almost • Symantec inherited forums-based community from Veritas acquisition in 2003. Built on Jive platform. • The Veritas Architect Network (VAN) experienced 3 years of autopilot mode until I joined in 2006 -- yet customers kept it breathing: Namely three “super-users” (customers) who answered 90% of all customer inquiries. • Aside from the forums, all other areas of the legacy VAN community were obsolete. They needed a fresh start. In late 2006 I turned to the three super-users and we forged an alliance. Together, we drafted the core elements for the new community. • Build or buy? SaaS was the answer. Compared several platforms but it came down to Lithium, Jive or Telligent. Lithium best fit our needs. • My team at Symantec then took that blueprint drafted with the super-users and in early 2007 we launched…. Case study (2007): Symantec
  7. 7. The Symantec Technology Network (STN) Tech news Articles and white papers written for our IT customers and prospective customers. Tech videos Landing page includes an embedded video player for product demos, tech talk & coverage from Vision and other industry events. Expert blogs An informal vehicle for talking directly to customers and partners on topics and issues that matter to them. Forums Q&A and threaded discussion on topics related to Symantec’s products. Email enabled.
  8. 8. Ways to promote your community Website (1st priority) Email (2nd priority) Social web (3rd priority) Event/other (4th priority) SEO mojo: Public communities get 70-80% of traffic from search
  9. 9. “Draft” off events & issues • Capitalize on the momentum from events like product launches, conferences, webinars, meetups (etc.) and issues (bugs) to drive conversations to the community.
  10. 10. More community growth secrets! • Registration: Make it easy & unitary (you become a community member when you become a customer) • Engagement: Calls to action; notification; recognition • Superusers: Identify; invite; engage; reward
  11. 11. Listen, triage, engage & analyze… CUSTOMERS USUALLY DON'T SHARE EVERY ISSUE WITH CUSTOMER SERVICE. THEY VENT ON SOCIAL MEDIA. MANAGE BRAND RISK AND BOOST NET PROMOTER SCORES RESOLVE CUSTOMERS’ NEEDS QUICKLY, EASILY, AND PERSONALLY BY BEING INSTANTLY ACCESSIBLE IN THEIR CHANNEL OF CHOICE. DECREASE CHURN BY ENGAGING MORE CUSTOMERS. INTEGRATED LISTENING: OPPORTUNITY TO ENGAGE ON ALL PUBLIC DIGITAL CONVERSATIONS. USE AI BASED TRIAGING: EVERY MESSAGE IS READ BY AI MODEL, FILTERING SPAM & NOISE FROM THE INBOX OF COMMUNITY MANAGER …across all social & messaging channels
  12. 12. USAA turned social rants into customer service tickets • Created a social media management support strategy to drive support savings. • Integrated platform data into their Client Relationship Manager (CRM) to create a cross-channel, 360 degree customer view for seamless service. • Customized the platform with features that improved customer experience, including real-time member name to social handle match and advanced agent routing • Drove support savings by removing 25+ manual processes including manual internal social customer care documentation.
  13. 13. Tom’s project/program management process 1) Project Initiation Phase – a project is formally started, named and defined at a broad level during this phase. 2) Project Planning Phase – a project management plan is developed comprehensively of individual plans for – cost, scope, duration, quality, communication, risk and resources. 3) Project Execution Phase – a project deliverable is developed and completed, adhering to a mapped-out plan. 4) Project Monitoring and Control Phase – occurring at the same time as the execution phase, this one mostly deals with measuring the project performance and progression in accordance to the project plan. 5) Project Closure Phase – A project is formally closed.
  14. 14. Nuts & bolts I ask myself 5 questions before every project: 1) How do I visualize the end-goal? I visualize in a concrete way what the end-goal looks like and what it will mean for my organization. 2) Does the team share the same vision? I make sure we are all on the same page. 3) Am I set to embrace change? Things happen. Go with the flow but steer the ship. Make the tough decisions and follow through. 4) Am I communicating with the team and stakeholders? Craft a communications plan to regularly share progress, challenges, daily activities and achievements. 5) How is execution supported internally? Project management tools such as Wrike, Jira, etc. help to ensure that nothing gets dropped and the plan stays on course.
  15. 15. Examples @social
  16. 16. More examples @social….
  17. 17. …and a few more @social
  18. 18. Thank you! Let’s connect • Email: tdieds@me.com • Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dieds • Facebook: www.facebook.com/Dieds • LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/tomdiederich

×