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NAHT 2019 Early Years Conference

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NAHT 2019 Early Years Conference

  1. 1. Dr Julian Grenier grenier@outlook.com @juliangrenier The early years curriculum meeting children’s today, and preparing them for tomorrow
  2. 2. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  3. 3. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  4. 4. It’s not just words EXPERIENCES CONVERSATIONS
  5. 5. [video from Siren Films not available in online version]
  6. 6. It’s not just words • The number of ‘conversational turns’ parents have with children aged 18-24 months is a stronger predictor of verbal comprehension and vocabulary 10 years later than the total number of words spoken, even after controlling for socioeconomic status. • http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ontent/142/4/e20174276
  7. 7. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  8. 8. https://educationinspection.blog.gov.uk/2019/11/04/early-reading-and-the- education-inspection-framework/
  9. 9. Some of the key points
  10. 10. The challenge • ‘about 15% of the adult population in OECD countries have not mastered the basics, being unable, for example, to fully understand instructions on a bottle of aspirin. These literacy problems are especially serious in England where younger adults perform no better than older ones (Kuczera et al., 2016).’ • http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1425. pdf
  11. 11. Research and evidence: best bets • The best evidence points to a well- implemented synthetic phonics programme having the best outcomes for children who might otherwise struggle to learn to read (Machin et al, 2016) • But we shouldn’t equate phonics with reading
  12. 12. https://www.tes.com/news/what-teachers-need-know-about-shared-reading
  13. 13. https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/tools/guidance-reports/preparing-for- literacy/
  14. 14. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  15. 15. Available for play and conversation?
  16. 16. Tracking • The main use of assessment is to help us plan the resources, routines and teaching so that children make progress. • Confidence, fluency and secure understanding matter • Much of our current assessment practice in the early years is ineffective and incredibly time-consuming
  17. 17. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  18. 18. Play is important “There is good evidence that being involved in imaginative play either with an adult, or with other children, is advantageous in terms of young children’s language development.” Professor David Whitebread, University of Cambridge
  19. 19. Pretend play • Pretend play helps children to develop their understanding of their own thinking, the understanding of others, and to co- operate (and control their impulses) • David Whitebread: self-regulation, in some ways, is the strongest predictor of success. If you can regulate your attention at four, you are more likely to do well in school and go onto university.
  20. 20. ‘Interventions that include an explicit focus on executive function skills do not need to be implemented separately from those focused on instruction in early literacy and math abilities…
  21. 21. … Indeed, the complex interactions that occur among executive functioning, social competence, and academic skills in preschool classrooms underscore the likely value of blending interventions designed to strengthen working memory, inhibition, and attention control with curricula focused on early literacy and math skills’. https://developingchild.harvard.edu/guide/a-guide-to- executive-function/
  22. 22. Working with parents • Girls get more support for learning at home than boys • Typically, but not always, children from more affluent homes have a better HLE • Most schools say that they do not have an explicit plan for how they work with parents • Fewer than 10% of teachers have undertaken CPD on parental engagement. https://educationendowmentfoundat ion.org.uk/tools/guidance- reports/working-with-parents-to- support-childrens-learning/
  23. 23. Today’s keynote Conversation: why it’s vital to children’s early learning and development Phonics and early reading Getting assessment right whilst reducing workload Learning from new evidence: self- regulation and working with parents Planning and sequencing the curriculum: what does ‘doing more and remembering more’ mean in the early years?
  24. 24. Knowing more and remembering more • Being able to take part in longer conversations • Using new vocabulary e.g. the names of birds, flowers or minibeasts seen and talked about during a Forest School session
  25. 25. Knowing more and remembering more • Knowing the language to use when talking about shapes and their properties e.g. corner or triangle • Knowing the words and actions of a finger rhyme; knowing the words of a song; knowing when a piece of music will get louder, or quieter and responding to that when playing along with it; knowing the steps of a dance routine (pop music) or a traditional dance (e.g. country dancing)
  26. 26. Knowledge is ‘sticky’ Once you know some things, it’s easier to know more
  27. 27. Ordering and sequencing • Strong foundations: does it stand together? • Why this? Why now?
  28. 28. • How high-quality interactions extend children’s development • The relevance of self-regulation to children’s educational success • The links between early language development and later literacy • Mathematical and scientific concept development in the early years • Ways to use observation, assessment of practice and planning to improve quality • The importance of early home learning and connections across ECEC settings and the home learning environment • The relevance of leadership for learning for children’s development and ways to improve it • https://www.earlychildhoodworkforce.org/sites/default/files/resources/Fostering%20Effectiv e%20Early%20Learning%20%28FEEL%29%20Study.pdf
  29. 29. ‘Best bets’ are not ‘final words’ Link to PowerPoint by Dylan William
  30. 30. ‘The child must have the opportunity to be as well as become.’ Philip Gammage (2003)
  31. 31. Find out more What happened to curriculum in the early years? Development Matters: A good start? Newham’s Early Years Conference with Gill Jones HMI, Wendy Ratcliff HMI and Jan Dubiel: tickets available on 9th and 10th January 2020 in Stratford East London Film clip from Siren Films: video-based training

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