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METHODS USED TO TREAT BACK AND WITHER WOUNDS IN EQUINES

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EVALUATION OF CURRENT METHODS USED TO TREAT BACK AND WITHER WOUNDS IN EQUINES, GUATEMALA

Publicado en: Salud y medicina
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METHODS USED TO TREAT BACK AND WITHER WOUNDS IN EQUINES

  1. 1. M. Sapon, M. Montufar, M. Upjohn and V. Fowler. Presented by: Dr Prem EVALUATION OF CURRENT METHODS USED TO TREAT BACK AND WITHER WOUNDS IN EQUINES, GUATEMALA
  2. 2. Working equines in Guatemala2
  3. 3. Working equines in Guatemala • Estimated 227,938 equines in Guatemala  74 % horses, 21% mules and 5% donkeys • Mainly used for transportation of goods by pack (TGP) • Common welfare problems include:  malnutrition,  dehydration,  overloading/overwork,  infectious disease,  parasite infestation,  work-related injuries 3
  4. 4. Work-related injuries • Wounds on the back and withers are frequently observed work related injuries on TGP equines • Anecdotally, wounds are rarely treated due to:  lack of owner knowledge;  poor availability/affordability of veterinary resources • Treatment usually comprises topical traditional medicines made from locally available plants 4
  5. 5. Aim of study To evaluate the effectiveness of topical treatment with traditional medicine made from a combination of four local plants against, a licensed veterinary medicine containing 2% Nitrofurazone (Furacine) in their ability to heal back and wither wounds 5
  6. 6. Standardised Wound Assessment Tool6 0 No wound 1 Superficial/healed lesion 2 Skin and immediate subcutaneous layers broken 3 Lesions deep enough to show muscle/tendon/bone
  7. 7. Study design • Twelve horses with varying sizes of a score 2 wound each randomly assigned to one group:  Group A: Nitrofurazone 2%  Group B: Medicinal plants  Group C: Saline (control) • Daily treatment for 45 days • Wound size and severity recorded at day 0 and every 5 days thereafter 7
  8. 8. Results: Mean severity of wounds8
  9. 9. Results: Mean severity of wounds9 • By day 45 mean wound severity in horses treated with Nitrofurazone 2% improved to grade 1.25 (SE 0.08) • By day 45 mean wound severity in horses treated with medicinal plants improved to grade 1.25 (SE 0.11) • Improvement in horses treated with Nitrofurazone 2% began at day 5, for those treated with medicinal plants began at day 25 • No improvement was seen the control group
  10. 10. Results: Mean size of wounds10
  11. 11. Results: Mean size of wounds11 • By day 45 in horses treated with Nitrofurazone 2% mean wound size reduced to 52% (SE 4.9) of original size • By day 45 in horses treated with medicinal herbs mean wound size reduced to 51% (SE 5.4) of original size • By day 45 the mean wound size in the control group was 56% (SE 5.0) of original IQR: Interquartile range
  12. 12. Study limitations • Size of study • Standards required to evaluate efficacy • Potential for variability in preparation of herbal treatment (owners vs. single source) 12
  13. 13. Conclusions • Even intensive treatment of wounds for extended period is unrewarding • Treatment of wounds with either Nitrofurazone 2% or medicinal plants may improve their severity and/or size to a greater extent than use of saline alone • Improvement in severity seen sooner with Nitrofurazone than with medicinal plants 13
  14. 14. Potential applications • Small study limitations of direct evidence for use of alternative treatment • Equine work-related injuries difficult to treat • Use of findings for owner discussions • Owners’ perceptions of avoidance strategies 14

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