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Rationalized Planning System

Rationalized Planning System

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Used for helping out Environmental Planning board takers for their exams. Content sourced from and credited to Prof. Serote's book with the same name, as well as HLURB Guidebooks and my Plan 214 lectures at SURP. Photo sources with URL links in the slides.

Used for helping out Environmental Planning board takers for their exams. Content sourced from and credited to Prof. Serote's book with the same name, as well as HLURB Guidebooks and my Plan 214 lectures at SURP. Photo sources with URL links in the slides.

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Rationalized Planning System

  1. 1. The Rationalized Local Planning System in the Philippines AN OVERVIEW RAGENE ANDREA L. PALMA, EnP ragenepalma@gmail.com littlemissurbanite.wordpress.com References: Rationalized Local Planning System in the Philippines by E. Serote; HLURB CLUP Guidbook Volume 1; RA 7160
  2. 2. 1 Planning Structure 5 CLUP 3 Information Base 7 Tools to Implement the CLUP 2 Mandates 4 Goal Formulation 6 CDP 9 Monitoring and Evaluation 8 LDIP 10 Getting it to Work
  3. 3. in “rationalizing” DEVOLUTION MULTIPLE PLANS ALIGNMENT OF PLANS
  4. 4. BODY POLITIC Political subdivision of the national government; exercise inherent powers https://errolgatumbato.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/nnnp-map.jpg
  5. 5. BODY CORPORATE Represents its residents; powers are used for good governance and providing basic services; mandated to promote general welfare http://www.clker.com/cliparts/a/9/3/Q/2/1/small-crowd-hi.png
  6. 6. http://www.travelindia-guide.com/elections-indian-lok-sabha/india-election-2009-images/political-parties/congress.jpg https://www.colourbox.com/preview/7335794-business-write-workshop-seminar-workshop-work-whiteboard-white- technology-technical-drawi-technical-teacher-teach-summit-student-structure-software-sketch-sign-showing-show- seminar-screen-science-research-presentation-pointing-plan-person-pen-organization.jpg POLITICAL TECHNICAL Defines the content and direction of local development Sanggunian and the Local Development Council Supplies technical information and processes; no decision-making powers MPDC, local special bodies, sectoral and functional committees, non-government
  7. 7. CLUP CDP Long-term guide for physical development Framework for the management and co-management of the local territory Enacted to ZO and becomes legally enforceable Comes from the function of being a political unit Must be consistent with the PPFP, RPFP, and NFPP Multi-year plan that promotes general welfare Covers all development sectors Consolidates programs and projects Comes from the capacity of being a corporate body
  8. 8. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf
  9. 9. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf
  10. 10. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf SPATIAL
  11. 11. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf SECTORAL
  12. 12. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf MEANSOF IMPLEMENTATION
  13. 13. CLUP IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS http://www.psst.ph/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/taxes-uk.jpg http://hiddencityphila.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/0-KeyImage.jpg https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/eminent-domain-at-a-price.jpg http://www.assetquest.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/investing-money.jpg http://www.thecorner.eu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/co-management.jpg ZONING ORDINANCE EMINENT DOMAIN PUBLIC CAPITAL INVESTMENTS CO-MANAGEMENT
  14. 14. CDP IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS http://www.afgtrucks.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Income-Tax-Return.jpg https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/javafx/user-interface-tutorial/img/pie-sample.png http://www.donnybrook-balingup.wa.gov.au/files/2016/05/money.gif http://www.binarysemantics.com/images/consulting/BOT.jpg TAX LEVIES SCHEMES INDEBTEDNESS INCOME FROM NATIONAL SHARES
  15. 15. 1 The Local Planning Structure
  16. 16. “Technocrats in both national and local levels prepare more or less elegant plans but it is common knowledge that these plans merely adorn the bookshelves of office executives... The main reason for this unfortunate reality is that legislators rarely use the plan as a basis for enacting laws and ordinances.” Planning is political, but...
  17. 17. The Sanggunian has power to “prescribe reasonable limits and restraints on the use of property” has power to appropriate public funds If planning is policy making then the sanggunian being the highest policy-making body is the ultimate planning body in the LGU is equally responsible for, and ought to be as actively involved in planning as the executive
  18. 18. Planning is also technical Sectoral committees’ inputs Consultants on hand provide technical inputs
  19. 19. The Local Planning Structure and its Functions
  20. 20. Local Development Councils 1. Provincial a. All mayors of component cities and municipalities; b. The chairman of the committee on appropriations of the sangguniang panlalawigan; c. The congressman or his representative; and d. Representatives of NGOs operating in the province, who shall constitute not less than one-fourth (1 /4) of the members of the fully organized council 2. City/Municipal a. All punong barangays in the city or municipality; b. The chairman of the committee on appropriations of the sangguniang panlungsod or sangguniang bayan concerned; c. The congressman or his representative; and d. Representatives of NGOs operating in the city or municipality, as the case may be, who shall constitute not le 3. Barangay a. Members of the sangguniang barangay; b. Representatives of NGOs operating in the barangay, who shall constitute not less than one-fourth (1/4) of the members of the fully organized council. c. A representative of the congressman.
  21. 21. LDC Functions FORMULATE • Plans and policies • Annual public investment programs • Investment incentives COORDINATE • Implementation of development programs and projects EVALUATE • Programs and projects
  22. 22. Executive Committee 1. PROVINCIAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL Executive Committee shall be composed of the governor as chairman, the representative of the component city and municipal mayors to be chosen from among themselves, the chairman of the committee on appropriations of the sangguniang panlalawigan, the president of the provincial liga ng mga barangay, and a representative of NGOs that are represented in the LDC, as members. 2. CITY / MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL Executive Committee shall be composed of the mayor as chairman, the chairman of the committee on appropriations of the Sangguniang Panlungsod or Sangguniang Bayan, the president of the city or municipal liga ng mga barangay, and a representative of NGOs that are represented in the LDC, as members. 3. BARANGAY DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL Executive Committee shall be composed of the punong barangay as chairman, a representative of the sangguniang barangay to be chosen from among its members, and a representative of NGOs that are represented in the LDC, as members.
  23. 23. Executive Committee Functions ENSURE implementation ATTEND to immediate matters FORMULATE policies, plans, programs TAKE final action on special concerns
  24. 24. Sectoral Functional Committees Members participate in functional committees Directly establishes connection with NGAs Functions: • Provide data and information • Define planning details: Objectives, targets, etc. • Provide analysis for information • Conduct public hearings • Coordinate • Monitor and evaluate
  25. 25. Secretariat Provides both technical and administrative support Assists with documentation Providing other types of assistance
  26. 26. Local Planning and Development Office Its “multifarious tasks” include: 1. Information management 2. Comprehensive and multi-sectoral planning 3. Investment programming 4. Public participation promotion 5. Secretariat services to LDC Should have these abilities: 1. Familiarity with all aspects and stages of the planning process 2. Ability to coordinate activities http://www.jewishmag.com/132mag/passover_slave/title.gif
  27. 27. Local Planning and Development Coordinator Administrative Support Public Information and Advocacy Service Deputy Local Planning and Development Coordinator Planning and Programming Division Sectoral Coordination and People Participation Division Planning Information Management Division CLUP Updating and Revision Specialist CDP Formulation Specialist LDP & AIP Preparation Specialist Social Development Coordinator Economic Development Coordinator Land Use & Infrastructure Development Coordinator Environmental Management Coordinator Institutional Development Coordinator Geographic Information Section Monitoring and Evaluation Section Statistical Database Section Special Studies and Research Section Local Planning and Development Office
  28. 28. 2 Planning Mandates of the Local Governments
  29. 29. The Constitution gives the basis for resource management: “The Congress shall give highest priority to the enactment of measures that protect and enhance the right of all the people to human dignity, reduce social, economic, and political inequalities, and remove cultural inequities by equitably diffusing wealth and political power for the common good. To this end, the State shall regulate the acquisition, ownership, use and disposition of property and its increments” (Article XIII, Section 1) “The use of property bears a social function and all economic agents shall contribute to the common good. Individuals and private groups, including corporations, cooperatives, and similar collective organizations, shall have the right to own, establish and operate economic enterprises, subject to the duty of the State to promote distributive justice and to intervene when the common good so demands” (Art. XII, Section 6).
  30. 30. Per RA7160 “Every LGU shall exercise the powers expressly granted, those necessarily implied there from, as well as powers necessary, appropriate or incidental for its efficient and effective governance, and those which are essential for the promotion of the general welfare. Within their respective territorial jurisdictions, local government units shall ensure and support, among other things, the preservation and enrichment of culture, promote health and safety, enhance the right of the people to a balanced ecology, encourage and support the development of appropriate and self-reliant scientific and technological capabilities, improve public morals, enhance economic prosperity and social justice, promote full employment among their residents, maintain peace and order and preserve the comfort and convenience of their inhabitants.” (Section 16)
  31. 31. Section 20 (c) “The local government units shall, in conformity with existing law, continue to prepare their respective Comprehensive Land Use Plans enacted through zoning ordinances which shall be the primary and dominant bases for the future use of the land resources “Adopt a Comprehensive Land Use Plan for the municipality/city: Provided, that the formulation, adoption, or modification of said plan shall be in coordination with the approved Provincial Comprehensive Land Use Plan.” Section 447(2)(vii)/Sec. 458(2)(vii) Section 447(2)(ix) - Municipality/Section 458(2)(ix) - City “Enact integrated zoning ordinances in consonance with the approved Comprehensive Land Use Plan, subject to existing laws, rules and regulations…”
  32. 32. CLUP CDP Translated to Zoning Ordinance Public investment programs, private incentives for investment Assigned to Sanggunian (the local legislative body) Local Development Council Purpose Management plan for the local territory; serves as a “skeletal- circulatory” framework; Identifies areas for development and non- development; directs development accordingly for investments An action plan; has cross- sectoral programs; used for implementation
  33. 33. Private Domain (Alienable and Disposable) Ancestral Domain Public Domain • Untitled A&D • Timberlands • Mineral Lands • National Parks • Municipal Waters The Geographical Scope: 3 Domains
  34. 34. The Time Frame Time Frame Plan 1 year AIP 3 years CDP 9 years CLUP 3 years LDIP Remains in effect despite administration change Zoning Ordinance
  35. 35. Basic CLUP Contents 1.Four policy areas 2.Urban form 3.Land use policy framework
  36. 36. SPACE FOR LIVING ROAD LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM SPACE FOR MAKING A LIVING 4 Policy Areas
  37. 37. SPACE FOR LIVING ROAD LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTECTED AREAS NIPAS, non-NIPAS, protected, agricultural, environmentally- constrained, heritage sites SETTLEMENT AREAS Urban, rural, indigenous peoples’ settlements INFRASTRUCTURE AREAS Transport network, social infrastructure, economic infrastructure, administrative support SPACE FOR MAKING A LIVING PRODUCTION AREAS Agricultural, industrial, commercial, tourism, mining 4 Policy Areas
  38. 38. http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2016/2227710089_6b54bc3c2c_o.jpg Urban Forms and Fabric Around the World
  39. 39. Land Use Policy Framework: Where do you locate the policy areas? “The chosen urban form is then used as the organizing concept for the location of various land uses and the formulation of location policies to be enforced through the zoning ordinance and other regulatory measures.” http://pr2013.aaschool.ac.uk/submission/uploaded_files/SUSTAINABLE-ENVIRONMENTAL- DESIGN/Density%20and%20Urban%20Form-Alexandra%20Andone%201.jpg
  40. 40. ECONOMIC SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICAL INSTITUTIONAL Understanding the CDP
  41. 41. WILDLIFE LGBTQ BRIDGE SUPPLY CHAIN SOCIAL JUSTICE HOUSING TAX COLLECTION ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY INVESTMENT ATTRACTION CLASSIFY THESE
  42. 42. INTER-SECTORAL CONCERNS SHOULD BE CROSS-CONSULTED
  43. 43. CDP COMPONENTS 1.Programs and Projects 2.Policies (local legislation)
  44. 44. THE LOCAL DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT PROGRAM “this form of public spending will modify, guide, direct, control or otherwise elicit the desired private sector response in order to accelerate local economic development, raise the level of socio-cultural well-being, improve the standard of public services, utilities and infrastructures, and, on the whole, attain the desired urban form in the CLUP and the general welfare goals of the CDP.”
  45. 45. LDIP COMPONENTS MAY: 1.Encourage growth 2.Discourage development 3.Limit growth in the urban fringe http://www.conwaygroup.co.uk/images/property/residential/BallymiscawRoad_plans.jpg
  46. 46. LDIP COMPONENTS: 1.The Final Project List Lifted from the plan; screened, evaluated based on potential contributions; consistency with urban form 2. Fiscal Management Projected total funds are matched with funds required for project implementation; links budgeting to planning
  47. 47. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
  48. 48. 3 Building and Maintaining an Information Base for Local Planning
  49. 49. ECOLOGICAL PROFILE (EP) LOCAL DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS SYSTEM (LDIS) In building a database:
  50. 50. ECOLOGICAL PROFILE (EP) “a snapshot” or “profile of the area at a given point in time” “data should be presented with minimal analysis and interpretation to give the SEP its maximum utility value” “geographical distribution of data attributes is not consistently portrayed” (city-, barangay-level) “the most important information base for the comprehensive planning”
  51. 51. EP COMPONENTS
  52. 52. EP: SOCIAL SECTOR All about the Population and Social Services Population: Basis for determining public services; a guide for allocating land due to people’s needs
  53. 53. https://www.google.com.ph/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwjS9efgmeXSAhUENrwKHQWsDMsQjBwIBA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.themacroscope.org%2Fwp- content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F04%2Fpropsymbolmap.png&bvm=bv.149760088,d.dGc&psig=AFQjCNFyLJGGu8UjM6xaACsHwWePwG98_g&ust=1490103350399276 POPULATION SIZE
  54. 54. http://www.bbc.co.uk/staticarchive/af3f08c6599814eb48f31e342ff21057ad389f67.gif POPULATION PYRAMID
  55. 55. Age Groups Age Dependent 0-14; 65 and above Labor force 15-64 School age 3-6, 7-12, 13-16 (old educational system); 6-11, 12-15, 16-17 (K-12) Female reproductive age 15-49 POPULATION AGE GROUPS
  56. 56. affects the incidence of births, deaths and marriages; implications on spatial mobility, work participation and occupational structure SEX COMPOSITION
  57. 57. AGE DEPENDENCY
  58. 58. FAMILY HOUSEHOLD consisting of a person living alone or a group of persons who sleep in the same housing unit and have a common arrangement for the preparation and consumption of food a group of persons living in the same household related by blood, marriage or adoption
  59. 59. POPULATION GROWTH: Births, Deaths, Migration http://static1.businessinsider.com/image/55b937bc2acae74c2f8b8d20-1200- 900/world-population-projection.png
  60. 60. https://www.google.com.ph/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwjfs8jumeXSAhVEgbwKHSSKA9EQjBwIBA&url=http% 3A%2F%2Fwww.statcan.gc.ca%2Fpub%2F92-195-x%2F2011001%2Fother- autre%2Fpop%2Fimage%2Fpop.jpg&bvm=bv.149760088,d.dGc&psig=AFQjCNHx9TWLf7Y805-b5ns8xtMruhxyGg&ust=1490103627217468 GROSS POPULATION DENSITY number of persons per unit of land area usually in hectares or square kilometers
  61. 61. http://www.geoknow.net/anthroposphere/images/urbanization/urbanization.jpg EXTENT OF URBANIZATION
  62. 62. A. In their entirety, all cities and municipalities having a population density of at least 1,000 persons per square kilometer. B. Poblaciones or central districts of municipalities or cities which have a population density of at least 500 persons per square kilometer. C. Poblaciones or central districts (not included in A & B) regardless of their population size if they have the following: a) street pattern, i.e. network of streets in either parallel or right-angel orientation; b) at least six establishments such as commercial, manufacturing, recreation and/or personal services; c) at least three of the following: · town hall, church or chapel with religious services at least once a month; · public plaza, park or cemetery; · market place or building where trading activities are carried on at least once a week; · a public building like school, hospital, puericulture and health center or library. “URBAN”
  63. 63. “URBAN” 1. If a barangay has a population size of 5,000 or more, then a barangay is considered urban, or 2. If a barangay has at least one establishment with a minimum of 100 employees, a barangay is considered urban, or 3. If a barangay has 5 or more establishments with a minimum of 10 employees, and 5 or more facilities within the two- kilometer radius from the barangay hall, then a barangay is considered urban Further, all barangays in the National Capital Region are automatically classified as urban and all highly urbanized cities would be subjected to the urban-rural criteria in order to determine its urban-rural classification. All other barangays are therefore classified as rural. http://nap.psa.gov.ph/pressreleases/2004/30Jan04_urban.asp
  64. 64. MEASURES OF URBANIZATION
  65. 65. POPULATION PROJECTION: AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH METHOD Increase of population for two periods of time Used for short- to medium-term projections EXAMPLE: “Taguig increased 13.3 thousand people per year from 1980 to 1990.”
  66. 66. STEP 1 Assign time 1 (t1) and time 2 (t2) STEP 2 Get the corresponding population from the table Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands)
  67. 67. STEP 1 Assign time 1 (t1) and time 2 (t2) STEP 2 Get the corresponding population from the table: Population of time 1 (Pt1) and population of time 2 (Pt2) In thousands
  68. 68. STEP 1 t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 STEP 2 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands
  69. 69. t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands
  70. 70. t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands Pt2 – Pt1 t2 – t1
  71. 71. t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands Pt2 – Pt1 t2 – t1 267 - 134 1990 - 1980
  72. 72. t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands Pt2 – Pt1 t2 – t1 267 - 134 1990 - 1980 = 133 10
  73. 73. t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 In thousands Pt2 – Pt1 t2 – t1 267 - 134 1990 - 1980 = 133 10 Taguig increased 13.3 thousand people per year from 1980 to 1990
  74. 74. Your turn! By how many people per year did NCR increase from 2000 to 2010?
  75. 75. SOLUTION t1 = 2000 t2 = 2010 Pt1 = 467 Pt2 = 644 Pt2 – Pt1 t2 – t1 11,836 – 9,932 2010 – 2000 = 1,904 10 NCR increased 190.4 thousand people per year from 2000 to 2010
  76. 76. POPULATION PROJECTION: AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH RATE EXAMPLE: “Taguig’s population almost doubled from 1980 – 1990.” The growth rate for this period is 9.9% increase per year.
  77. 77. ( ) By how much did the population of Taguig change from 1980 to 1990? Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) %Δ 1980 - 1990 P90 – P80 P80 (100) = 99%
  78. 78. ( ) By how much did the population of Taguig change from 1980 to 1990? Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) %Δ 1980 - 1990 P90 – P80 P80 (100) = 99% Percentage almost doubled! But we’re looking for the RATE.
  79. 79. ( ) By how much did the population of Taguig change from 1980 to 1990? Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) AAGR80, 90 : P90 – P80 P80 (100) = 9.9% 1990 - 1980
  80. 80. Your turn! By how much per year did the population of Taguig change from 2000-2010?
  81. 81. Your turn! ( )AAGR00,10 : P10 – P00 P00 (100) = ? 2010 - 2000 ( )644 - 467 467 (100) = 3.8% 10 AAGR00,10 :
  82. 82. POPULATION PROJECTION: COMPOUNDED GROWTH RATE EXAMPLE: The population of Taguig in 2020 will be 1.2 million.
  83. 83. What will be the population of Taguig in 2020? Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) Pt2 = Pt1 (1 + r) (t2 – t1)
  84. 84. What will be the population of Taguig in 2020? Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) Pt2 = Pt1 (1 + r) (t2 – t1) We need the growth rate to solve this: Derive from any two population years with available data.
  85. 85. ( ) Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) t1 = 1980 t2 = 1990 Pt1 = 134 Pt2 = 267 r = Pt2 Pt1 1 t2 -t1 - 1 ( )r80,90 = 267 134 1 10 - 1 r80,90 = 0.07
  86. 86. Now that we have the value of r (0.07), let’s plug it back into the compound growth formula, and assign new time values: Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) Pt2 = Pt1 (1 + r) (t2 – t1) t1 = 2010 t2 = 2000 Pt1 = 644 Pt2 = ?
  87. 87. Population, Census Years 1970-2010 (In thousands) Pt2 = 644 (1 + 0.07) (2010-2000) r = 0.07 t1 = 2010 t2 = 2000 Pt1 = 644 Pt2 = ? Pt2 = 1,266.86 thousand
  88. 88. EP: THE LOCAL ECONOMY All about markets, employment, industries, potential investments
  89. 89. Primary Secondary Tertiary Quaternary Quinary STRUCTURE OF THE LOCAL ECONOMY
  90. 90. LEVEL OF URBANIZATION
  91. 91. LINKAGES i. Backward – an activity or industry that provides input materials and services to, say, agriculture, e.g. farm implements, fertilizers, pesticides, certified seeds is linked in a backward manner. ii. ii. Forward – an activity that uses the output of a particular activity, say, sugar milling, e.g. candies, softdrinks, confectionery, is linked in a forward manner. iii. Vertical – where two or more firms produce components of a final output, e.g. parts of a car. iv. Horizontal – where two or more firms produce complete products that are complementary in use, e.g. furniture shops each specializing in one type of furniture like chairs, tables, cabinets, etc. v. Diagonal – where a service cuts across different types of firms, e.g. security services, insurance, messengerial or forwarding services. vi. Residentiary – where services to the employees or managerial staff are provided by firms or households, e.g. housing, recreation, food catering
  92. 92. LINKAGES http://thienhungfruit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Durian.jpg
  93. 93. LINKAGES http://thienhungfruit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Durian.jpg http://foodevolution.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/foodevolution_-Davao- candy.jpg http://www.stepbysteprecipe.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/img_3241.jpg
  94. 94. LINKAGES http://thienhungfruit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Durian.jpg http://foodevolution.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/foodevolution_-Davao-candy.jpg http://www.stepbysteprecipe.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/img_3241.jpg http://www.yixunmachines.com/uploads/140225/2-140225162202442.jpg http://worldartsme.com/images/black-and-white-candy-wrapper-clipart-1.jpg https://d30y9cdsu7xlg0.cloudfront.net/png/5024-200.png
  95. 95. LINKAGES http://thienhungfruit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Durian.jpg http://foodevolution.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/foodevolution_-Davao-candy.jpg http://www.stepbysteprecipe.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/img_3241.jpg http://www.yixunmachines.com/uploads/140225/2-140225162202442.jpg http://worldartsme.com/images/black-and-white-candy-wrapper-clipart-1.jpg https://d30y9cdsu7xlg0.cloudfront.net/png/5024-200.png
  96. 96. DEMONSTRATE YOUR OWN LINKAGE TREE
  97. 97. CUMULATIVE CAUSATION BY GUNNAR MYRDAL
  98. 98. TOWN SPECIALIZATION LOCATION QUOTIENT Pertains to the specialization of an area Variable may be employment or local exports Can be expressed in 1% or proportion If greater than 1, the specialization has a comparative advantage among other industries
  99. 99. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 Does Region I specialize in tertiary industries?
  100. 100. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 % employment, R1 tertiary % employment, country tertiary
  101. 101. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 % employment, R1 tertiary % employment, country tertiary 694 1,622 14,461 30,439 = 0.89
  102. 102. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 % employment, R1 tertiary % employment, country tertiary 694 1,622 14,461 30,439 = 0.89 0.89 < 1
  103. 103. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 % employment, R1 tertiary % employment, country tertiary 694 1,622 14,461 30,439 = 0.89 0.89 < 1 No, R1 does not specialize in tertiary industries.
  104. 104. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 Your turn! Does NCR specialize in tertiary activities?
  105. 105. EMPLOYMENT (in thousands) by industry group, 2002 SOLUTION % employment, NCR tertiary % employment, country tertiary 3,048 4,002 14,461 30,439 = 1.62 1.62 > 1
  106. 106. MONEY FLOW THEORY •IRA share of the LGU •Salaries of NGA personnel posted in the locality •Homeward remittances of locals working elsewhere •Earnings of local capital invested elsewhere •Export sales of local products •Foreign-funded projects implemented in the locality •Receipts from tourism •Receipts from services to outsiders •Capital lent by banks to local residents •Inbound investments •Municipal share to provincial government taxes (RPT, etc.) •Outside purchases of the local government •Outside purchases of local households •Imports of local business establishments •School expenses of locals studying elsewhere •Profits of investors remitted elsewhere •Salaries paid to workers in the locality who live elsewhere •Local savings invested by commercial banks elsewhere •Insurance premiums paid by locals •Outbound investments by locals https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-7a9d1917ae2f0e344ce423e0ddbfc08c INFLOW OUTFLOW
  107. 107. MONEY FLOW THEORY Two scenarios If there is hardly any storage: (1)Increase the magnitude and rate of inflow. (2) Decrease the magnitude and rate of outflow. (3)Adopt both measures at the same time There is sizeable storage: Direct policy and development towards money circulation and growth
  108. 108. MONEY FLOW THEORY Take scenario #2: Decrease the magnitude and rate of outflow Money simply stored does not grow; Money must circulate
  109. 109. DAVID HARVEY’S THEORY OF CIRCUITS CAPITAL Private owners invest where perceived return is greatest. FASTEST SLOWEST Explains why we have more banks and malls than manufacturing businesses and agricultural investments.
  110. 110. EP: THE PHYSICAL AND SPATIAL BASE About land supply, natural resources, and infrastructure
  111. 111. ADMINISTRATIVE / BOUNDARY / POLITICAL MAP http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/tlresources/clipart/maps/uslabeled.GIF
  112. 112. http://www.gelib.com/store/wp-content/uploads/bfi_thumb/Screenshot3-2sirrjamifv1lc950ivy16.jpg TOPOGRAPHIC MAP
  113. 113. http://www.ppdobohol.lgu.ph/wp-content/uploads/wppa/297.jpgVEGETATIVE COVER
  114. 114. Soil https://www.qld.gov.au/environment/assets/images/land/soil/dominant-soils-large.jpg SOIL MAP
  115. 115. https://nc.water.usgs.gov/albe/maps/hydgeo.gif HYDROGEOLOGIC MAP
  116. 116. Existing Land Use http://dublinohiousa.gov/dev/dev/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/future-land-use- map.jpg LAND USE MAP
  117. 117. . Land Classification Map http://www.ppdobohol.lgu.ph/wp-content/uploads/wppa/293.jpg LAND CLASSIFICATION
  118. 118. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/69/Agusan_river_watershed.png RIVER SYSTEMS
  119. 119. http://giscourse.com/images/Blog/BiodiveristyMap.jpg BIODIVERSITY MAP
  120. 120. http://www.matton.se/mapcomps/LIB/Helsingborg_C.jpg INFRASTRUCTURE MAP
  121. 121. SIEVE MAPPING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM
  122. 122. http://switotwins.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Napalico-Elementary-School- 5.jpg SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE
  123. 123. http://interaksyon.com/assets/images/articles/interphoto_1332650642.png ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE
  124. 124. https://www.vigattintourism.com/assets/article_main_photos/optimize/1347082740 Q0EUpEBw.jpg PUBLIC SPACES
  125. 125. EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR INFRASTRUCTURE WAYS FORWARD 1. Appropriateness 2. Adequacy 3. Level of utility 4. Accessibility a) freeze the expansion of existing facilities b) extend or expand the existing service c) put up new needed facilities.
  126. 126. EP: THE ENVIRONMENT Environment and natural resources
  127. 127. Natural Resources Inventory http://www.eschooltoday.com/natural-resources/images/where-do-raw-materials-come-from.jpg
  128. 128. Environmental Assessment http://www.worldoceanassessment.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/DPSIR9.gif
  129. 129. YOUR TURN DRIVER ? PRESSURE ? STATE Uncontrolled waste management IMPACT ? RESPONSE ?
  130. 130. LOCAL DEVELOPMENT INDICATOR SYSTEM Portrays information in three dimensions: TOPICAL OR SECTORAL TEMPORAL GEOGRAPHICAL OR SPATIAL
  131. 131. DELINEATION OF GEOGRAPHICAL UNITS PROCESSING OF DATA ENTRIES INTO INDICATORS http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/cartography-toolbox/GUID-B21B9F22-61A8-4975-85D4- 9B68C8850228-web.png http://www.emmsit.co.uk/var/ezwebin_site/storage/images/media/images/data-processing2/2329-1-eng- GB/Data-Processing.gif Enables us to comprehend the city in its entirety and in relation to counterparts Used to standardize (per capita, %, average, etc.) for cognition, analysis, policy- making, and M&E
  132. 132. Using the LDIS • Use as an information base • Used to extract intelligence from data through problem- finding • Generate the information: What do the figures mean? • Probe into the cause: Why? • Explore the implication: So what?
  133. 133. PROBLEM- AND SOLUTION- FINDING ANALYSIS
  134. 134. 4 Goal Formulation Process
  135. 135. “...the process of determining goals and designing the means by which these goals may be achieved.” - Robert Young THE ELABORATION OF ENDS THE SPECIFICATION OF MEANS
  136. 136. ‘...goal formulation is the “hingepin on which the rational planning process turns”. (Chadwick) A badly conceived goal cannot lead to a good plan. Worse, without goals, any move that people make is at best only an aimless rambling, a directionless locomotion.’
  137. 137. VALUES GOALS Motivates action and behavior Welfare values: Well- being, wealth, skill, knowledge Deference values: Respect, affection, justice, righteousness derives motivation from both internal (value) and external (stimuli) sources s m a r t OBJECTIVES
  138. 138. VALUES INFLUENCE GOALS
  139. 139. 5 SOURCES OF GOALS 1. The Universal Concept of Public Interest 2. The General Welfare Goals 3. Regional Physical Framework Plans 4. National Policies 5. Local Communities
  140. 140. Observed Conditions Explanations Implications Policy Options Poverty rate is increasing Rapid tourism establishment growth along coastal area Frequent flooding Limited parks and open spaces for the citizenry YOUR TURN
  141. 141. GOAL VISION or ?
  142. 142. GOALS a.To achieve a rational distribution of the region’s population. b.To ensure access to economic opportunities and social services. c. To attain optimum utilization of natural resources. d.To preserve and maintain the integrity of the environment
  143. 143. We envision Davao City as the Premier Socio-economic and Tourism Center in Mindanao, East Asean Growth Area (EAGA) and the Asia-Pacific Region propelled by enlightened leaders and empowered citizenry and committed to sustainable growth and development under the guidance of Divine Providence. VISION: DAVAO CITY
  144. 144. ...A modern urban center where people can put up their business and thrive ...Where people can find decent work and means of living to feed, house, and educate their families ...Where people will be safe and able to pursue their dreams of a better life for themselves and their loved ones VISION: BACOLOD CITY
  145. 145. “An empowered and healthy Negrense in a globally-competitive, ecologically balanced and peaceful Negros Occidental under a responsive and accountable governance.” VISION: NEGROS OCCIDENTAL
  146. 146. A VISION STATEMENT... 1. Is long term 2. must reflect its dual character as a political unit and as a corporate body 3. a desired role the LGU can play or the best contribution it can make to the development of the nation, the region and the province of which the LGU is an integral part 4. a desired state of the LGU as an environment for its inhabitants to live in and where they can make a living
  147. 147. ◙ The town/city/province as an effective partner in national development o Identification of the wider region to which it relates o Definition of its role or roles in the region ◙ The town/city/province as an environment for living and as a place for making a living o Qualities of the people as society o Nature of the local economy o State of the natural environment o Condition of the built environment ELEMENTS OF A VISION STATEMENT
  148. 148. INDICATORS
  149. 149. 5 THE COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLANNING PROCESS
  150. 150. 1 Balancing the future demand for, and supply of land for urban development 2 Generation and characterization of alternative spatial strategies or urban forms 3 Evaluating the alternatives and selecting the preferred strategy 4 Detailing the preferred urban form 5 Formulating the land and water use policy framework
  151. 151. https://img.clipartfest.com/865f31eb2e64568be8ba029bd09aed64_are-supply-demand-driving-supply- demand-clipart_632-395.jpeg
  152. 152. 1) projection of future demand for urban land, 2) assessment of land supply, and 3) matching the demand with available supply IT’S ALL ABOUT
  153. 153. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Baul%C3%BCcke_in_K%C3%B6ln- Weidenpesch_(9506).jpg SUPPLY STRATEGIES: INFILLING
  154. 154. http://www.europan- europe.eu/media/default/0001/04/63fe3cb09336ea6e358091e99e295c988cc899f8.jpeg DENSIFICATION
  155. 155. http://www.museumofthecity.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/blog-1.jpg URBAN RENEWAL
  156. 156. http://www.leightonasia.com/en/what-we- do/PublishingImages/Civil_Infrastructure/H2189_civil_infrastructure_Central_Reclmn_1_b.jpg RECLAMATION
  157. 157. DEMAND STRATEGIES 1) Improved rural services 2) Alternative growth centers 3) Relocation or resettlement
  158. 158. DEMAND-SUPPLY BALANCING MODEL
  159. 159. SPATIAL STRATEGIES
  160. 160. GENERATION OF SPATIAL STRATEGIES
  161. 161. URBAN FORM STEREOTYPES
  162. 162. DISPERSED SHEET
  163. 163. twisted sifter.com
  164. 164. GALAXY OF SETTLEMENTS
  165. 165. https://thesemaphoreline.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/abercrombie-plan- communities-map-1942.jpg
  166. 166. THE RING
  167. 167. https://s-media-cache- ak0.pinimg.com/originals/1a/88/5e/1a885e2158b61f167c9df259c45e2d04.jpg
  168. 168. THE CORE
  169. 169. THE URBAN STAR
  170. 170. https://twistedsifter.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/milan-italy-at-night-from-space- nasa.jpg?w=800&h=534 https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/652909497862721536/Qj-aNER8.jpg
  171. 171. IN EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES, THERE ARE SEVERAL METHODS
  172. 172. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS
  173. 173. CRITICISMS ON THE COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS 1) The calculation of costs and benefits in monetary terms may be too long, complicated, and expensive. 2) It does not accommodate intangible benefits nor indirect costs of related projects. 3) It does not give room for uncertainties in implementation. 4) It is suitable for the evaluation of single projects with simple objectives. 5) It does not lend it self to participatory processes and is confined to technical evaluations only
  174. 174. PLANNING BALANCE SHEET By Nathaniel Lichfied present not only the tangible costs and benefits but also the intangible and unmeasured costs and benefits for different affected groups
  175. 175. GOAL ACHIEVEMENT MATRIX By Morris Hill
  176. 176. SUMMARY OF GAM SCORES
  177. 177. GOAL ACHIEVEMENT MATRIX Highly participatory Biases from different groups are all factored in A social consensus is achieved
  178. 178. UPON SELECTION OF THE STRATEGY Detail the following: 1. Settlement areas: CBD (center), residential areas 2. Production areas: Commercial areas, industrial areas, agricultural and resource areas, tourism areas 3. Infrastructure areas: Circulation system, utilities, urban services 4. Open space and preservation areas
  179. 179. 6 THE COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  180. 180. SECTORS AND THEIR CONCERNS Social Quality of Life, Social Characteristics, Access to Social Services, Social Justice, General Welfare Economic Full employment, food security, business and investments Environment Safeguarding and conserving resources and the environment Infrastructure Enhancement of economic prosperity; Promotion of health and safety; Preservation of comfort and convenience among the residents Institutional Planning, local fiscal management, governance, public participation
  181. 181. SECTORAL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  182. 182. VISION REALITY GAP
  183. 183. LEGISLATION IDENTIFICATION
  184. 184. CLUP-CDP INTEGRATION
  185. 185. IDENTIFY AND ARRANGE PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS
  186. 186. PROGRAM / PROJECT VS CONTRACTUAL ENGAGEMENTS
  187. 187. CREATING THE EXECUTIVE LEGISLATIVE AGENDA (ELA) “sectoral programs and projects and the proposed legislations are compiled, reconciled, and otherwise processed and refined to form the LGU’s Executive – Legislative Agenda (ELA) for the next 3 years”
  188. 188. HOW TO CONCRETIZE
  189. 189. 7 Tools for Implementing the CLUP
  190. 190. http://jagna.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Zoning-Map-2011-20201.jpg ZONING
  191. 191. http://business-mirror.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/2015/04/oped01- 041015.jpg TAXES
  192. 192. http://business-mirror.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/2015/04/oped01- 041015.jpg REAL PROPERTY TAX SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND IDLE LANDS SPECIAL BENEFIT LEVY
  193. 193. RPT Privilege of land ownership is taxed Special Education Fund Administered by the local school boards, the SEF goes into financing the construction and repair of school buildings, facilities and equipment, conduct of educational research, purchase of books and periodicals, and the development of sports. Special Benefit Levy assessment on lands that are specially benefited by public works projects, whether these be new construction or improvements on existing ones. This tax allows local governments to recover as much as sixty percent (60%) of the cost of the project Idle Lands Lands that are unutilized or not improved
  194. 194. https://intellectualfroglegs.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Eminent-Domain- 724x437.jpg EMINENT DOMAIN The transfer of privately owned land into the hands of local governments
  195. 195. http://photos.wikimapia.org/p/00/04/66/65/38_big.jpg PUBLIC INVESTMENT PROGRAMMING
  196. 196. http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine- star/business/agriculture/20150719/training-program-6.jpg GUIDED PRIVATE INVESTMENT
  197. 197. http://cdn.oilprice.com/images/tinymce/James%206/AE2946 .png CO-MANAGEMENT OF OTHER DOMAINS
  198. 198. 8 Local Investment Programming
  199. 199. UNDERSTANDING THE CONCEPTS OF... Local Development pertains to only those projects that are within the scope of the LGU; in pursuance of the LGU’s exercise of its powers and in the discharge of its duties and functions necessary for effective governance and essential for the promotion of the general welfare.
  200. 200. UNDERSTANDING THE CONCEPTS OF... Public Investment “investment is what is left after deducting all expenses necessary to run the government machinery, to satisfy the claims of creditors if public debt has been incurred, and to comply with statutory reserves”
  201. 201. 1 Call for project ideas 2 Solicit and compile project ideas 3 Initial screening of projects 4 Screening for complementarity, compatibility, or conflict 5 Project ranking 6 Estimating project costs PREPARING THE RANKED LIST OF PROJECTS
  202. 202. 1 Call for project ideas Official public announcement 2 Solicit and compile project ideas 1. Based on the CDP 2. Identified by the Sectoral Committee 3. From other sources, such as the barangay development council, NGOs, private sector, individuals, etc.
  203. 203. 3 Initial screening of projects 4 Screening for complementarity, compatibility, or conflict 1. Consolidate repetitive or redundant proposals 2. Screen out projects that are impractical or undesirable 3. Screen out projects that are implemented by other agencies Use the conflict- compatibility- complementarity matrix
  204. 204. 5 Project ranking Goal-achievement matrix (GAM) is utilized Factors in social and political considerations Trims down the project list; may have modification
  205. 205. 6 Estimating project costs 1. Matching of projects with available funds 2. If there are already available cost estimates, LPDO only needs to validate or refine estimates
  206. 206. DETERMINING INVESTIBLE FUNDS LGU financing depends on: 1. Revenue level of the LGU 2. Level of recurring local government operating expenditures 3. Current public debt level 4. Statutory debt ceiling 5. Potential sources of additional revenue available for investment project financing
  207. 207. THE LOCAL FINANCE COMMITTEE 1. Composed of the LPDC, Budget Officer, Treasurer 2. Charged with setting the level of the annual expenditures and ceilings of spending for socio-economic and general services based on the approved development plans
  208. 208. 1 Collect revenue data and determine trends 2 Collect operating expenditure data incuding debt and determine trends 3 Establish structural relationships of revenue and expenditure items to population and economic development 4 Project future recurring LGU revenue and operating expenditure levels 5 Compute the financial surplus available DETERMINING INVESTIBLE FUNDS
  209. 209. 1 Collect revenue data and determine trends is any inflow of funds to the LGU regardless of whether the source is repayable or not. WHAT IS REVENUE? https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1061/1924/files/Money_Face_Emoji.png?98989227 49706957214
  210. 210. 1 Collect revenue data and determine trends WHAT ARE EXAMPLES OF LGU REVENUES? a. Real Property Taxes b. Business Fees and Licenses c. Other Taxes d. Service and Operations Income e. Internal Revenue Allotment
  211. 211. 1 Collect revenue data and determine trends (1) changes in the tax base such as increases in the number of taxable structures or businesses; and (2) changes in tax rates WHAT THE ANALYSIS MUST HAVE
  212. 212. 2 Collect operating expenditure data incuding debt and determine trends evenue data and determine trends WHAT IS OPERATING EXPENDITURE? includes personnel services (including social charges) and maintenance and other operating expenses (MOOE) such as office supplies and expenses, utilities (power, water, telecommunications), office equipment and miscellaneous expenses. http://pix.iemoji.com/images/emoji/apple/ios-9/256/face-with-open-mouth-and-cold- sweat.png
  213. 213. 2 Collect operating expenditure data incuding debt and determine trends evenue data and determine trends HOW TO ANALYZE THE EXPENDITURE 1. General public services 2. Social services 3. Economic services
  214. 214. 3 Establish structural relationships of revenue and expenditure items to population and economic development (1) the overall national and regional economic picture including development trends; (2) demographic shifts; and (3) changes in the local market, particularly in the local labor market. KEY FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED
  215. 215. WHAT SHOULD PROVIDE GUIDANCE: 1. General public services 2. Social services 3. Economic services 3 Establish structural relationships of revenue and expenditure items to population and economic development
  216. 216. FOR EXAMPLE 1. Trend in per capita yield 2. Movement of business tax yield 3 Establish structural relationships of revenue and expenditure items to population and economic development
  217. 217. 4 Project future recurring LGU revenue and operating expenditure levels ASSESSMENT SHOULD SHOW (1) a conscious upward or downward adjustment of the computed historical growth rates or (2) through the assumed per capita income growth rates to which the appropriate revenue elasticity is to be applied
  218. 218. 4 Project future recurring LGU revenue and operating expenditure levels WHAT DATA TO USE FOR PROJECTION (1) the historical 3 to 5 year average annual expenditure increase or (2) the historical average expenditure per unit of output in the case of LGU business enterprises
  219. 219. 4 Project future recurring LGU revenue and operating expenditure levels GROWTH RATE SCENARIOS (1) No change (2) Change by constant amounts (due to recent shifts in the analysis, anticipated changes, different estimates) (3) Change at a constant rate (4) Correlation with economic or demographic variable
  220. 220. PROJECTED REVENUES (LESS) : PROJECTED OPERATING EXPENSES (LESS) : EXISTING DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS (EQUALS) : AMOUNT AVAILABLE FOR NEW INVESTMENT FINANCING 5 Compute the financial surplus available NEW INVESTMENT FINANCING CAPACITY
  221. 221. MATCHING AND ITERATION STREAM 1 Project Cost Estimates STREAM 2 Projection of funds available
  222. 222. MATCHING AND ITERATION STREAM 1 Project Cost Estimates STREAM 2 Projection of funds available
  223. 223. MATCHING AND ITERATION (1) First round matching (2) LDC approves (3) LDC deliberates and decides on the financing approach CONSERVATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL PRAGMATIC
  224. 224. MATCHING AND ITERATION CONSERVATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL PRAGMATIC Only projects that can be funded from regular sources will be implemented Short list of projects is taken as final and irreducible. The LGU will then tap all sources possible to raise the needed funds to implement the project package Combination of conservative and developmental
  225. 225. MATCHING AND ITERATION CONSERVATIVE Only projects that can be funded from regular sources will be implemented 1.LDC trims the project list 2.LDC approves the final list of projects 3.LPDO prepares the 3- year annual investment plan
  226. 226. MATCHING AND ITERATION DEVELOPMENTAL Short list of projects is taken as final and irreducible. The LGU will then tap all sources possible to raise the needed funds to implement the project package 1.Improve fiscal management (tax, cut expenditures, impose levy) 2.Incur public debt or credit financing (loans, issuance of bonds, borrowing, pre- financing with private sector, i.e. BOT)
  227. 227. 9 MONITORING AND EVALUATION: TOWARDS CYCLICAL PLANNING
  228. 228. MONITORING a continuous process of data collection and analysis to check whether a project is running according to plan and to make adjustments if required. It is an evaluative study directed to the short term.
  229. 229. EVALUATION a systematic process of collecting and analyzing information about activities and results of a project in order to determine the project’s relevance and/or to make decisions to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of a project.
  230. 230. WHEN TO DO M&E?
  231. 231. WHEN TO DO M&E?
  232. 232. 10 GETTING THE LOCAL PLANNING SYSTEM TO WORK
  233. 233. http://hlurb.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/services/lgu/CLUP/HLURB_CLUP_Vol_1.pdf
  234. 234. (1)Agriculture and Fisheries Management Plan, including the Strategic Agriculture and Fisheries Development Zone (SAFDZ) (2)Forest Management Plan or Forest Land Use Plan (FLUP) (3)Sustainable Integrated Area Development Plan or Local Agenda 21 (SIADP) (4)Integrated Watershed Management Plan (IWMP) (5)Ancestral Domain Sustainable Development and Protection Plan (ADSDPP) (6)Protected Area Management Plan (PAMP) (7)Coastal Resources Management Plan (CRMP) SHOULD BE INCORPORATED INTO THE CLUP
  235. 235. Plans that require inter-sectoral functional committees (a)Local Poverty Reduction Action Plan (b)Disaster Management Plan (c) Sustainable Development Plan (d)Gender and Development Plan (e)Food Security Plan (f) Integrated Area Community Peace and Order and Public Safety Plan Plans that fall within the concern of individual sectors (a)Action Plan for the Council for the Protection of Children (b)Annual Culture and Arts Plan (c) Agriculture and Fisheries Management Plan (d)Coconut Development Program (e)Local Entrepreneurship Development Program (f) Local Tourism Plan (g)Small and Medium Enterprise Development Plan SHOULD BE INCORPORATED INTO THE CDP

Notas del editor

  • Functions
  • Compared to mother province
    2 Processing of data indicators
  • ABERCROMIE PLAN:
    NEW TOWNS FOR POST-WAR LONDON
  • Special Benefit Levy
    assessment on lands that are specially benefited by public works projects, whether these be new construction or improvements on existing ones. This tax allows local governments to recover as much as sixty percent (60%) of the cost of the project
  • effects of the utilization of the outputs produced (project outcomes)
    contribution to the realization of development goals (project impacts)

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