Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
OVERVIEWOF PHILIPPINEEDUCATIONALSYSTEMAND
ITSPRESENTSTATUS
DISCUSSANT: FRANCISCO I. BARCELONA JR.
Philippine Educational System
Spanish Contribution
Present Educational System
American Contribution
Japanese Contribution
Before 1521
Pre-colonial Period
1. The type of education is
informal and unstructured
2. The home serves as their
school
3. The parent...
Pre-colonial Period
6. most communities, stories, songs,
poetry, dances, medicinal practices
and advice regarding all sort...
Method of Education:
1. “Tell Me” or “Show Me” or
demonstration method
2. Alibata (Baybayin )which
is composed of 14
conso...
1521-1896
Spanish Contribution
• education was formal
• established schools from the
primary level to the tertiary
level of educatio...
Spanish Contribution
• missionary teachers (friars) replaced the tribal
tutors
• Catholic doctrine schools that were set u...
SPANISH CONTRIBUTION
• There were 3 grades: entrada, acenso, and termino
• The curriculum required the study of Christian ...
Method of teaching:
a. catechetical instruction,
b.use of corporal punishment
c. rote memorization
d.instruction was in di...
Spanish Contribution
Roles:
1. The friars controlled the educational system
2. The missionaries took charge in teaching, c...
American Contribution
1898-1935
American Contribution
• Course of study is
prescribed uniform and
centralized
• Formal structured and
existence of an
educ...
1899 - more schools were opened, this time, with 24
English-language teachers and 4500 students
Act No. 74 - a highly cent...
The same law established the Philippine Normal School
(now the Philippine Normal University) to train aspiring
Filipino te...
Act No. 1870 initiated the opening of the University of the
Philippines, now the country's national university. (1908)
att...
JAPANESE CONTRIBUTION
1941-1944
Japanese Contribution
Characteristics:
Course of study:
a. Prescribed;
b. Uniform; and
c. Centralized
Japanese Contribution
6 Basic Principles of Japanese Education
1. To stop depending on western countries like the U.S., an...
The Present Education System in the
Philippines
1946 to present
The Philippine Education System
• was patterned to the educational systems of SPAIN and
of the UNITED STATES After the Lib...
EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES
CHED and TESDA, on the other hand, are
responsible for higher education; CHED
regulates the a...
EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES
Managed and regulated by the:
• Department of Education (DepEd)
• Commission on Higher Educat...
Former educational systam (used from 1945 until June 5, 2011
School Grade Other names Age
Kindergarten was not
compulsory
...
The start of the twenty-first century's second decade
saw a major improvement in the Philippine education
system.
In 2011,...
• 2010 - Senator Benigno Aquino III expressed
his desire to implement the K–12 basic
education cycle to increase the numbe...
General Features of K to 12 Education Program
• Strengthening Early Childhood Education (Universal
Kindergarten)
• Making ...
Pre-school
• Ages 3 to 5
• Students learn the alphabet, numbers, shapes, and colors
through games, songs, and dances in th...
Pre-school
Republic Act 8980 Early Childhood Care and Development
Act - Enacted in 2000, this law identifies the growing
i...
Primary Education
• Age of 6 to 11
• consists of compulsory six grades (Grades 1-6)
• Primary level (grades 1-3)
• Interme...
Primary Education
Medium of Instruction
Grades 1-3: the use of Mother tongue except Filipino and
English subject
Grades 4-...
Secondary Education
• Ages 12-17
• Prerequisite of which is the completion of elementary
education
• Four years of junior ...
Junior High School
• Subjects are taught from the simplest concepts to more
complicated concepts through grade levels in s...
Senior High School
• two years of specialized upper secondary education
• choice of career track will define the content of...
• TVET (Technical Vocational Education & Training)
NATIONAL CERTIFICATE student can obtain Certificates
of Competency (COC)...
Arts and Design Track
Arts and Design Track will prepare
student for the creative industries in various
creative and artis...
Sports Track
Sports track will prepare students with sports
science, sports-related, physical education-
related, health-r...
Tertiary Education/ Higher Education
CHED is responsible in the formulation and
implementation of policies, plans and prog...
Three DegreeStages of Higher Education
• Bachelor Degrees - minimum of 4 years in duration
• Master Degrees - typically sp...
NON-FORMAL EDUCATION AND ALTERNATIVE
LEARNING SYSTEM
• an organized learning activity aimed at attaining a
set of objectiv...
NON-FORMAL EDUCATION AND ALTERNATIVE
LEARNING SYSTEM
• it is not only a supplement and complement of formal
education but ...
Technical Education and Skills Development
Authority
The merging of the National Manpower and Youth
Council(NMYC) of the D...
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
• aims to encourage the full participation of and mobilize the
indust...
Timeline
Before 1521 Education before the coming of Spaniards
1521-1896 Education during the Spanish Regime
1896-1899 Educ...
Overview Philippine Educational System
Overview Philippine Educational System
Overview Philippine Educational System
Overview Philippine Educational System
Overview Philippine Educational System
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Overview Philippine Educational System

15.068 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Current Trends

Publicado en: Educación
  • Inicia sesión para ver los comentarios

Overview Philippine Educational System

  1. 1. OVERVIEWOF PHILIPPINEEDUCATIONALSYSTEMAND ITSPRESENTSTATUS DISCUSSANT: FRANCISCO I. BARCELONA JR.
  2. 2. Philippine Educational System Spanish Contribution Present Educational System American Contribution Japanese Contribution
  3. 3. Before 1521
  4. 4. Pre-colonial Period 1. The type of education is informal and unstructured 2. The home serves as their school 3. The parents serves as their teachers 4. Focused more on vocational than academics 5. tribal tutors (for example, the babaylan)
  5. 5. Pre-colonial Period 6. most communities, stories, songs, poetry, dances, medicinal practices and advice regarding all sorts of community life issues were passed from generation to generation mostly through oral tradition. 7. Some communities utilised a writing system known as baybayin 8. alibata - composed of 17 symbols representing the letters of the alphabet.
  6. 6. Method of Education: 1. “Tell Me” or “Show Me” or demonstration method 2. Alibata (Baybayin )which is composed of 14 consonants and 3 vowels 3. Oral, practical and hands on
  7. 7. 1521-1896
  8. 8. Spanish Contribution • education was formal • established schools from the primary level to the tertiary level of education. • focused on the Christian Doctrines • separate school for boys (colegios) and girls (beaterio) • Ilustrados were accommodated in the schools
  9. 9. Spanish Contribution • missionary teachers (friars) replaced the tribal tutors • Catholic doctrine schools that were set up initially became parochial schools which taught reading and writing along with catechism. • Education Decree of 1863 - mandated the establishment of free primary schools in each town, one for boys and one for girls, with the precise number of schools depending on the size of the population.
  10. 10. SPANISH CONTRIBUTION • There were 3 grades: entrada, acenso, and termino • The curriculum required the study of Christian doctrine, values and history as well as reading and writing in Spanish, mathematics, agriculture, etiquette, singing, world geography, and Spanish history. Girls were also taught sewing. • The Normal School, run by the Jesuits, was also established which gave men the opportunity to study a three-year teacher education for the primary level. Normal schools for women teachers were not established until 1875, in Nueva Caceres.
  11. 11. Method of teaching: a. catechetical instruction, b.use of corporal punishment c. rote memorization d.instruction was in dialect
  12. 12. Spanish Contribution Roles: 1. The friars controlled the educational system 2. The missionaries took charge in teaching, controlling and maintaining the rules and regulations 3. Parochial schools were led by Dominicans and Jesuits 4. Establishment of normal school for male teachers under the supervision of the Jesuits
  13. 13. American Contribution 1898-1935
  14. 14. American Contribution • Course of study is prescribed uniform and centralized • Formal structured and existence of an educational system
  15. 15. 1899 - more schools were opened, this time, with 24 English-language teachers and 4500 students Act No. 74 - a highly centralised, experimental public school system was installed in 1901 by the Philippine Commission . between 1901 and 1902 - Philippine Commission authorized the Secretary of Public Instruction to bring more than 1,000 teachers from the United States, who were called the Thomasites, to the Philippines . These teachers were scattered throughout the islands establish barangay schools.
  16. 16. The same law established the Philippine Normal School (now the Philippine Normal University) to train aspiring Filipino teachers. The high school system was supported by provincial governments and included special educational institutions, schools of arts and trades, an agricultural school, and commerce and marine institutes, which were established in 1902 by the Philippine Commission. Act No. 372 - authorised the opening of provincial high schools.
  17. 17. Act No. 1870 initiated the opening of the University of the Philippines, now the country's national university. (1908) attainment. Act No. 1381, also known as Gabaldon Law, was passed in 1907, which provided a fund of a million pesos for construction of concrete school buildings Filipinization policy of the government, the Reorganization Act of 1916 provided that all department secretaries except the Secretary of Public Instruction must be a natural-born Filipino.
  18. 18. JAPANESE CONTRIBUTION 1941-1944
  19. 19. Japanese Contribution Characteristics: Course of study: a. Prescribed; b. Uniform; and c. Centralized
  20. 20. Japanese Contribution 6 Basic Principles of Japanese Education 1. To stop depending on western countries like the U.S., and Great Britain. Promote and enrich the Filipino culture. 2. To recognize that the Philippines is a part of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere so that the Philippines and Japan will have good relations. 3. To be aware of materialism to raise the morality of the Filipinos 4. To learn and adopt Nippongo and to stop using the English language. 5. To spread elementary and vocational education. 6. To develop love for work.
  21. 21. The Present Education System in the Philippines 1946 to present
  22. 22. The Philippine Education System • was patterned to the educational systems of SPAIN and of the UNITED STATES After the Liberation of the Philippines in1946, Filipinos • had moved in various directions of its own • Elementary and high school is compulsory which is administered by the DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
  23. 23. EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES CHED and TESDA, on the other hand, are responsible for higher education; CHED regulates the academically- oriented universities and colleges while TESDA oversees the development of technical and vocational education institutions and programs in the country.
  24. 24. EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES Managed and regulated by the: • Department of Education (DepEd) • Commission on Higher Education (CHED) • Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) DepEd is responsible for the K–12 basic education; it exercises full and exclusive control over public schools and nominal regulation over private schools, and it also enforces the national curriculum that has been put in place since 2013.
  25. 25. Former educational systam (used from 1945 until June 5, 2011 School Grade Other names Age Kindergarten was not compulsory Primary Primary Grade 1 6-7 Grade 2 7-8 Grade 3 8-9 Grade 4 Intermediate 9-10 Grade 5 0-11 Grade 6 11-12 Secondary First Year Freshman 12-13 Second Year Sophomore 13-14 Third Year Junior 14-1 Fourth Year Senior 15-16
  26. 26. The start of the twenty-first century's second decade saw a major improvement in the Philippine education system. In 2011, the Department of Education started to implement the new K-12 educational system, which also included a new curriculum for all schools nationwide. The K- 12 program has a so-called "phased implementation", which started in S.Y 2011-2012.
  27. 27. • 2010 - Senator Benigno Aquino III expressed his desire to implement the K–12 basic education cycle to increase the number of years of compulsory education to thirteen years. • the K–6–4–2 basic education system • Kindergarten Education Act of 2012 - kindegarten compulsory • Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013. • SY 2011–2012 DepEd - has already implemented the K–12 Program it was still enacted into law to guarantee its continuity in the succeeding years.
  28. 28. General Features of K to 12 Education Program • Strengthening Early Childhood Education (Universal Kindergarten) • Making the Curriculum Relevant to Learners (Contextualization and Enhancement) • Ensuring Integrated and Seamless Learning (Spiral Progression) • Building Proficiency through Language (Mother Tongue- Based Multilingual Education) • Gearing Up for the Future (Senior High School) • Nurturing the Holistically Developed Filipino (College and Livelihood Readiness, 21st Century Skills)
  29. 29. Pre-school • Ages 3 to 5 • Students learn the alphabet, numbers, shapes, and colors through games, songs, and dances in their Mother Tongue. • Offered to private and public schools • Pre-school education is optional before entering elementary level since not everyone could afford it • Recent events and activities show a high need for young children to undergo preschool education first before stepping into formal education
  30. 30. Pre-school Republic Act 8980 Early Childhood Care and Development Act - Enacted in 2000, this law identifies the growing importance of providing preschool education and addressing young children's other needs. It also recognizes parents as the children’s primary caregivers and teachers. Republic Act 6972 (Barangay Level Total Protection of Children Act) Enacted in 1990, this law requires all local government units to set up a day care center in every barangay. Day care centers are mandated not only to provide for the children’s learning needs but also to attend to their health and psychosocial needs.
  31. 31. Primary Education • Age of 6 to 11 • consists of compulsory six grades (Grades 1-6) • Primary level (grades 1-3) • Intermediate level (grades 4-6) Subjects taught • Mathematics, Science, Filipino, English, HEKASI (Heyograpiya, Kasaysayan at Sibika) • Minor subjects: Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health • Computer Education and HELE are the additional minor subjects for private schools
  32. 32. Primary Education Medium of Instruction Grades 1-3: the use of Mother tongue except Filipino and English subject Grades 4-6: Filipino and English
  33. 33. Secondary Education • Ages 12-17 • Prerequisite of which is the completion of elementary education • Four years of junior high school and two years of senior high school • Junior high school is composed of grade 7 to grade 10 • Senior high school is from grade 11 to grade 12
  34. 34. Junior High School • Subjects are taught from the simplest concepts to more complicated concepts through grade levels in spiral progression • Subjects are connected and integrated from Grades 7 to 10
  35. 35. Senior High School • two years of specialized upper secondary education • choice of career track will define the content of the subjects a student will take in Grades 11 and 12 • subjects fall under either the Core Curriculum or specific Tracks Senior high school- CORE CURRICULUM • 7 Learning Areas under the Core Curriculum and these are: • Languages Mathematics Social Sciences • Literature Philosophy • Communication Natural Science
  36. 36. • TVET (Technical Vocational Education & Training) NATIONAL CERTIFICATE student can obtain Certificates of Competency (COC) or a National Certificate Level I (NC I) after finishing grade 10 • After finishing a Technical-VocationalLivelihood track in Grade 12, a student may obtain a National Certificate Level II (NC II) :provided that he/she passes the competency- based assessment of the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) Technical - Vocational -Livelihood
  37. 37. Arts and Design Track Arts and Design Track will prepare student for the creative industries in various creative and artistic fields such as but not limited to: music, dance, creative writing and literature, visual arts, media arts, broadcast arts, film and cinema, applied arts, architecture and design, theater, entertainment, etc.
  38. 38. Sports Track Sports track will prepare students with sports science, sports-related, physical education- related, health-related, and movement-related courses which will let them explore and specialize in fields like sports fundamental coaching, student-athlete development, sports officiating and activity management, recreational and fitness or sports leadership.
  39. 39. Tertiary Education/ Higher Education CHED is responsible in the formulation and implementation of policies, plans and programs for the development and efficient operation of the higher education system in the country. The delivery of higher education in the Philippines is provided by private and public higher education institutions (HEIs).
  40. 40. Three DegreeStages of Higher Education • Bachelor Degrees - minimum of 4 years in duration • Master Degrees - typically span 2 years for full-time students, culminating with minor thesis or comprehensive examination • PhD Degrees - Doctor of Philosophy, involve great deal of coursework, as well as dissertation that may comprise from 1/5 - 1/3 of the final grade.
  41. 41. NON-FORMAL EDUCATION AND ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM • an organized learning activity aimed at attaining a set of objectives outside the established formal system intended for a particular clientele, especially the out-of-school youth or adult illiterates who cannot avail themselves of formal education • courses are skills-oriented and range from 6 to 10 months
  42. 42. NON-FORMAL EDUCATION AND ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM • it is not only a supplement and complement of formal education but is an indispensable component of a lifelong learning system • non-formal education plays a very important role in national development • the only effective way of providing education to the millions of out-ofschool youths and adults to enable them to participate more effectively in the various development programs of the government
  43. 43. Technical Education and Skills Development Authority The merging of the National Manpower and Youth Council(NMYC) of the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE). The Bureau of Technical and Vocational Education (BTVE) of the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), and The Apprenticeship Program of the Bureau of Local Employment(BLE) of the DOLE gave birth to TESDA.
  44. 44. Technical Education and Skills Development Authority • aims to encourage the full participation of and mobilize the industry, labor, local government units and technical-vocational institutions in the skills development of the country's human resources. • Institutions may be government operated, often by provincial government, or private • offer programs ranging in duration from a couple of weeks to two- year diploma courses. • Programs can be technology courses like automotive technology, computer technology, and electronic technology service. Upon graduating from most of these courses, students may take an examination from TESDA to obtain the relevant certificate or diploma
  45. 45. Timeline Before 1521 Education before the coming of Spaniards 1521-1896 Education during the Spanish Regime 1896-1899 Education during the Philippine Revolution 1898-1935 Education during the American Occupation 1935-1941 Education during the Philippine Commonwealth 1941-1944 Education during the Japanese Occupation 1944-1946 Education after the World War II 1946-present Education under the Philippine Republic

×