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  1. 1. Element is an advocate for business, planet & wellbeing – our three main editorial pillars. Our content focuses on the triple bottom line and what this means for New Zealand – finding an economic, social and environmental balance for the future prosperity of all New Zealanders.
  2. 2. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. With both a permanent digital section on nzherald.co.nz and a print publication on the last Monday of each month in The New Zealand Herald, Element aims to inspire and guide Kiwis to transform New Zealand into the healthiest, most liveable destination on the planet. ABOUT ELEMENT PLUS: Sea Week / EcoWest / Climate change / Composting toilets / Organics Innovations for the home Building clean tech NZ’s best timber, and how to use it Ways with wood Bright green architecture Meet the planet’s best eco architects How buildings can benefit nature Monday, February 24, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING Has coal lost its sheen? Black gold PLUS: Sea Week / EcoWest / Climate change / Composting toilets / Organics Innovations for the home Building clean tech NZ’s best timber, and how to use it Ways with wood Bright green architecture Meet the planet’s best eco architects How buildings can benefit nature Monday, February 24, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING Has coal lost its sheen? Black gold Monday, July 28, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING PLUS: Solar power / Wood stoves / Hot water / E vehicles It isn’t over The GE debate Interview: chief bodyguard Saving the gingas Nelson Mandela Te Radar the blue economyA new global business paradigm Monday, July 28, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING PLUS: Solar power / Wood stoves / Hot water / E vehicles It isn’t over The GE debate Interview: chief bodyguard Saving the gingas Nelson Mandela Te Radar the blue economyA new global business paradigm PLUS: Te Radar / efficient homes / solar energy / save the honeybees Mitsubishi’s Outlander PHEV Hybrid car test drive Expert organic tips Spring gardening Farming for a cleaner future Monday, September 29, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING Will Abbott change his mind? G20 & climate change PLUS: Te Radar / efficient homes / solar energy / save the honeybees Mitsubishi’s Outlander PHEV Hybrid car test drive Expert organic tips Spring gardening Farming for a cleaner future Monday, September 29, 2014 BUSINESS PLANET WELLBEING Will Abbott change his mind? G20 & climate change Kiwis are increasingly inspired to improve their lives and make changes that will protect our planet and natural resources. This shift, fuelled by emerging generations means sustainability issues are now becoming mainstream. Element’s integrated media solution provides local and global insights and information across a range of channels for consumers that are now committed to buying and supporting ethical, natural and sustainable brands and products.
  3. 3. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. Element magazine is the biggest sustainability publication and the second biggest business publication in New Zealand. ABOUT ELEMENT - PRINT BY JAMES RUSSELL How to start a World-changing enterprise 10 element S INCE MAN FIRST TRADED A FISH FOR A HANDFUL OF berries, business and commerce have existed and thrived. For a while, everything was hunky dory. For quite a while, actually. When the industrial revolution arrived, so too did fortunes beyond which had ever been imagined. When the Second World War ended, growth of every conceivable measurable skyrocketed yet again. What we didn’t realise was that the vast majority of businesses were making the equivalent of Dr Suess’s Thneeds, with no regard for the social or environmental effects that came from a direct result of making products or providing services. Where our raw materials came from, what they were made from or how they were obtained didn’t matter. What happened to them after our customers finished with them didn’t matter either – that was someone else’s problem. The realisation that resources are finite, and that damage has been done, has inspired a new business philosophy – that of the ‘conscious capitalism’ model. This redefines success, broadening the parameters by which it is measured to include environmental and social goals, and enlarging the pool of benefactors to all stakeholders – as opposed to just shareholders. In effect, it’s the hybrid child of the union of traditional business, environmentalism and charity. Further, that business model has been applied with fantastic effect toward helping to solve some of society’s most pressing social concerns. The benefits of the conscious capitalism model include growing awareness of environmental problems or social issues, the more rapid achievement of social outcomes and environmental goals, the reduced need for state or philanthropic funding (or, at least, the one-off need for it only), additional learning and innovation to solve problems, and the sustainable nature of these organisations due to their ability to create revenue or be self-sustaining. It sounds like some utopian ideal, but a few of our most forward-thinking business people have been operating these models for years. But the time is well overdue when new organisations must aspire to do the same – for the sake of the fragility of the planet’s ecosystems and climate, the wellbeing of its inhabitants, and the scarcity of resources. This is Element’s guide to starting a social enterprise or a conscious business, or indeed turning your existing company into one. It’s designed to guide you through start- up, incubation, funding, launch and growth. We talk to industrial designers, marketers, entrepreneurs, incubators and strategists. Pull it out and refer to it often. It might just inspire you to build something you can be truly proud of. Socialenterprise: An organisation that applies commercial strategies to maximise improvements in human and environmental well-being,rather than maximising profits for external shareholders. Consciouscapitalism: Businesses which have a higher purpose in terms of environmental and social goals,while also maximising shareholder profit. World-changing enterprise 11element Establishapurpose In 1970 Kiwis Viv and Richard Cottrell travelled to India to work with Tibetan refugees. On their return home they brought with them some of the beautiful rugs made by the refugees, and sold them for a small profit. Seeing the opportunity to both make a living and help those in developing countries trade their way out of poverty, the Cottrells broadened the enterprise to other countries and other products, and Trade Aid was born. This small, idealistic company has grown into 28 stores, engaging thousands of New Zealanders as staff and volunteers, and hundreds of thousands of consumers who have been able to vastly improve the lives of people half way around the world. For forty years Trade Aid has asked its customers to consider asking ‘who made this?’ and whether they were justly and fairly compensated, and what sort of impact the product has had on the world. Welcome to conscious capitalism and social enterprise. The Cottrells started with an idealistic purpose, and built a business model around achieving it. But the reverse can also be true. Perhaps following your business plan will leave the planet and its people worse off. Retrofitting your business to encompass a broader social return on investment (SROI) is also possible. A good example is New Zealand’s Z Energy, which is attempting to lessen its environmental impact through the development of alternative energy sources such as biofuels. “I acknowledge climate change is real, and it is caused mostly by humans, and that the products we sell are part of the problem. We have decided that we should be part of the solution,” said CEO Mike Bennetts, speaking to Element recently. Establishing a purpose becomes the business’s reason for being – its modus operandi – and the basis for the organisation’s vision statement. “Once you have a compelling purpose, you run the normal business model, but ensure that you check in regularly to make sure it’s working toward achieving that purpose,” explains Qiujing Wong, co-founder and chief executive of Borderless Productions. A small company with an international client list, Borderless influences through its two complementary offerings – digital storytelling and social change actions – and last year Qiujing was awarded the Blake Leader Award by the Sir Peter Blake Trust for her contribution to social change. Alongside her husband, co-founder and managing director Dean Easterbrook, Wong has run Borderless for eight years. Their 2007 documentary ‘A Grandmother’s Tribe’ is an example of what they do. Described as a ‘for-purpose’ documentary, A Grandmother’s Tribe is the story of some 13 million orphans in sub-Saharan Africa who are now being reared by their grandmothers. Its complementary campaign has raised funds and awareness for those grandmothers and which continues to this day by the mechanism of concerned citizens holding screenings of the film to raise funds. Borderless Productions turns a profit, employs a handful of full time staff, and a much larger pool of freelance film production staff for its work, all the while improving the lives of the subjects of its films, campaigns and advertisements. Says Wong: “Social change is everyone’s work so, when we tackle an issue, we don’t see ourselves as the problem solvers – we see ourselves instead as bringing together the energy that is already out there, helping to crystallise thinking, develop strategies and then create ways of working. That ensures everyone feels involved in taking action and being a part of the solution.” Wong says social change often takes a long time – many social issues will take at least a generation to shift. “We have to be patient, and determined. “It’s also often complex, so we are realistic that a ‘one size fits all’ solution is not going to work – instead, we find many approaches working collaboratively and cohesively is a much more powerful way to work.” The company’s latest achievements include co-founding the Be. Accessible campaign, a nationwide accessibility campaign in New Zealand; founding the Borderless Foundation; and creating Harpooned Soul, a North American film and campaign targeting youth around the subject of drug abuse. Another New Zealand company with strong social and environmental goals is All Good Organics. Auckland based, the company imports Fairtrade bananas from Ecuador, dried banana chunks from Samoa, and produces a range of organic soft drinks. Its ‘Karma Cola’, for example, contains real cola nut from the Boma village in Sierra Leone with natural spices; vanilla bean grown by the Forest Garden Growers Association in Sri Lanka and organically grown and processed sugar cane from the Suminter Organic Farmers Consortium in Maharashtra, India. The recipient of global sustainability awards, the organisation is typical of the business career of Chris Morrison, who started All Good with his brother Matt and friend Simon Coley. Other profitable conscious enterprises include Phoenix Organics, Clean Planet cleaning business, Kokako organics and Nice Blocks –Fairtrade, organic iceblocks. “I am only interested in investing in and supporting businesses which are based around environmental and social sustainability,” says Morrison. “These are in line with my personal ethics and, fortunately, are on trend. There is a strong business case for these types of investments.” Global snapshot The UK is a leader with an estimated 68,000 social enterprises contributing £24bn to the economy. Australia’s government and social finance providers recently invested $40 million AUD to stimulate the sector,estimated to include 20,000 ventures. In the US,the sector is estimated to be 3.5 per cent of GDP,with one-third of the increase taking place since 2011.JP Morgan predicts the global social impact investment market could reach US$1 trillion by 2020. Source: MJ Kaplan report Dean Easterbrook and Qiujing Wong, from Borderless Productions. Photo: Richard Crayton “Writingachequemightimpact hundredsofpeople’slives;mobilising yourwholebusinesstodrivechange canimpactmillionsoflives,andgive awholenewlifepurposetoallthe peoplewhoworkinyourcompany.” — RIchARD BRAnSon 13element BY JAMES RUSSELL How to start a World-changing enterprise 10 element S INCE MAN FIRST TRADED A FISH FOR A HANDFUL OF berries, business and commerce have existed and thrived. For a while, everything was hunky dory. For quite a while, actually. When the industrial revolution arrived, so too did fortunes beyond which had ever been imagined. When the Second World War ended, growth of every conceivable measurable skyrocketed yet again. What we didn’t realise was that the vast majority of businesses were making the equivalent of Dr Suess’s Thneeds, with no regard for the social or environmental effects that came from a direct result of making products or providing services. Where our raw materials came from, what they were made from or how they were obtained didn’t matter. What happened to them after our customers finished with them didn’t matter either – that was someone else’s problem. The realisation that resources are finite, and that damage has been done, has inspired a new business philosophy – that of the ‘conscious capitalism’ model. This redefines success, broadening the parameters by which it is measured to include environmental and social goals, and enlarging the pool of benefactors to all stakeholders – as opposed to just shareholders. In effect, it’s the hybrid child of the union of traditional business, environmentalism and charity. Further, that business model has been applied with fantastic effect toward helping to solve some of society’s most pressing social concerns. The benefits of the conscious capitalism model include growing awareness of environmental problems or social issues, the more rapid achievement of social outcomes and environmental goals, the reduced need for state or philanthropic funding (or, at least, the one-off need for it only), additional learning and innovation to solve problems, and the sustainable nature of these organisations due to their ability to create revenue or be self-sustaining. It sounds like some utopian ideal, but a few of our most forward-thinking business people have been operating these models for years. But the time is well overdue when new organisations must aspire to do the same – for the sake of the fragility of the planet’s ecosystems and climate, the wellbeing of its inhabitants, and the scarcity of resources. This is Element’s guide to starting a social enterprise or a conscious business, or indeed turning your existing company into one. It’s designed to guide you through start- up, incubation, funding, launch and growth. We talk to industrial designers, marketers, entrepreneurs, incubators and strategists. Pull it out and refer to it often. It might just inspire you to build something you can be truly proud of. Socialenterprise: An organisation that applies commercial strategies to maximise improvements in human and environmental well-being,rather than maximising profits for external shareholders. Consciouscapitalism: Businesses which have a higher purpose in terms of environmental and social goals,while also maximising shareholder profit. World-changing enterprise 11element Establishapurpose In 1970 Kiwis Viv and Richard Cottrell travelled to India to work with Tibetan refugees. On their return home they brought with them some of the beautiful rugs made by the refugees, and sold them for a small profit. Seeing the opportunity to both make a living and help those in developing countries trade their way out of poverty, the Cottrells broadened the enterprise to other countries and other products, and Trade Aid was born. This small, idealistic company has grown into 28 stores, engaging thousands of New Zealanders as staff and volunteers, and hundreds of thousands of consumers who have been able to vastly improve the lives of people half way around the world. For forty years Trade Aid has asked its customers to consider asking ‘who made this?’ and whether they were justly and fairly compensated, and what sort of impact the product has had on the world. Welcome to conscious capitalism and social enterprise. The Cottrells started with an idealistic purpose, and built a business model around achieving it. But the reverse can also be true. Perhaps following your business plan will leave the planet and its people worse off. Retrofitting your business to encompass a broader social return on investment (SROI) is also possible. A good example is New Zealand’s Z Energy, which is attempting to lessen its environmental impact through the development of alternative energy sources such as biofuels. “I acknowledge climate change is real, and it is caused mostly by humans, and that the products we sell are part of the problem. We have decided that we should be part of the solution,” said CEO Mike Bennetts, speaking to Element recently. Establishing a purpose becomes the business’s reason for being – its modus operandi – and the basis for the organisation’s vision statement. “Once you have a compelling purpose, you run the normal business model, but ensure that you check in regularly to make sure it’s working toward achieving that purpose,” explains Qiujing Wong, co-founder and chief executive of Borderless Productions. A small company with an international client list, Borderless influences through its two complementary offerings – digital storytelling and social change actions – and last year Qiujing was awarded the Blake Leader Award by the Sir Peter Blake Trust for her contribution to social change. Alongside her husband, co-founder and managing director Dean Easterbrook, Wong has run Borderless for eight years. Their 2007 documentary ‘A Grandmother’s Tribe’ is an example of what they do. Described as a ‘for-purpose’ documentary, A Grandmother’s Tribe is the story of some 13 million orphans in sub-Saharan Africa who are now being reared by their grandmothers. Its complementary campaign has raised funds and awareness for those grandmothers and which continues to this day by the mechanism of concerned citizens holding screenings of the film to raise funds. Borderless Productions turns a profit, employs a handful of full time staff, and a much larger pool of freelance film production staff for its work, all the while improving the lives of the subjects of its films, campaigns and advertisements. Says Wong: “Social change is everyone’s work so, when we tackle an issue, we don’t see ourselves as the problem solvers – we see ourselves instead as bringing together the energy that is already out there, helping to crystallise thinking, develop strategies and then create ways of working. That ensures everyone feels involved in taking action and being a part of the solution.” Wong says social change often takes a long time – many social issues will take at least a generation to shift. “We have to be patient, and determined. “It’s also often complex, so we are realistic that a ‘one size fits all’ solution is not going to work – instead, we find many approaches working collaboratively and cohesively is a much more powerful way to work.” The company’s latest achievements include co-founding the Be. Accessible campaign, a nationwide accessibility campaign in New Zealand; founding the Borderless Foundation; and creating Harpooned Soul, a North American film and campaign targeting youth around the subject of drug abuse. Another New Zealand company with strong social and environmental goals is All Good Organics. Auckland based, the company imports Fairtrade bananas from Ecuador, dried banana chunks from Samoa, and produces a range of organic soft drinks. Its ‘Karma Cola’, for example, contains real cola nut from the Boma village in Sierra Leone with natural spices; vanilla bean grown by the Forest Garden Growers Association in Sri Lanka and organically grown and processed sugar cane from the Suminter Organic Farmers Consortium in Maharashtra, India. The recipient of global sustainability awards, the organisation is typical of the business career of Chris Morrison, who started All Good with his brother Matt and friend Simon Coley. Other profitable conscious enterprises include Phoenix Organics, Clean Planet cleaning business, Kokako organics and Nice Blocks –Fairtrade, organic iceblocks. “I am only interested in investing in and supporting businesses which are based around environmental and social sustainability,” says Morrison. “These are in line with my personal ethics and, fortunately, are on trend. There is a strong business case for these types of investments.” Global snapshot The UK is a leader with an estimated 68,000 social enterprises contributing £24bn to the economy. Australia’s government and social finance providers recently invested $40 million AUD to stimulate the sector,estimated to include 20,000 ventures. In the US,the sector is estimated to be 3.5 per cent of GDP,with one-third of the increase taking place since 2011.JP Morgan predicts the global social impact investment market could reach US$1 trillion by 2020. Source: MJ Kaplan report Dean Easterbrook and Qiujing Wong, from Borderless Productions. Photo: Richard Crayton “Writingachequemightimpact hundredsofpeople’slives;mobilising yourwholebusinesstodrivechange canimpactmillionsoflives,andgive awholenewlifepurposetoallthe peoplewhoworkinyourcompany.” — RIchARD BRAnSon 13element • Element is inserted in the NZ Herald on the last Monday of every month. • Element is known for its quality journalism and works with some of the best journalists in NZ and around the world. • Element is distributed nationally to a targeted list of business leaders, MP’s and key influencers. • Element is a highly credible and trustworthy publication that influences opinions about your brand.
  4. 4. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. elementmagazine.co.nz is a section of nzherald.co.nz ABOUT ELEMENT - DIGITAL elementmagazine.co.nz sits in its own section on nzherald.co.nz within National news, the best read section of the site, as well as within Environment. The combined reach of these sections together, instantly make it the best read sustainability site in New Zealand. Content runs across appropriate sections of nzherald.co.nz so it reaches additional readers. SEO headlines are implemented so people searching on Google can easily find our content and your products. eDM A weekly eDM is sent to a passionate, growing subscriber database of 5,000 people every Monday. SOCIAL MEDIA Element is active on • Twitter: twitter/elementmagnz • Facebook: facebook.com/Elementmagazine
  5. 5. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. Element reaches 134,000 New Zealanders each month. OUR PRINT AUDIENCE Element readers are spending millions of dollars a week on a large and diverse range of products and services. More than one in four readers are Business Decision Makers with an average household income of $174,000. More than one in four readers are in life stages three or four with an average household income of $139,000. of Element readers own their own home. have savings or investments. $72% 72%
  6. 6. Element readers realise they change the world by supporting good companies. CONSUMERS WHO CARE feel more loyal to a company that aligns itself with a charity or worthy cause. of Element readers think it is important to ensure that companies they purchase products and services from show high levels of social and/or environmental responsibility. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. out of 6 10 64%
  7. 7. Source: Nielsen CMI Q3 13 – Q2 14. Based on an AP10+ Audience. Element readers are spending millions of dollars a week on a large and diverse range of products and services. PURCHASING POWER Element readers spend a total of over $11 million on food in their household per week. Element readers spend a total of over $400K on major household appliances per week. of Element readers intend to renovate in the next 12 months, and intend to spend an average of $9,500 to do so. Element readers spend a total of almost $3 million on household electricity per week. 60,000
  8. 8. Element print and digital ads are available in a variety of sizes and price points. Specifications, rates and deadlines can be found on nzme.co.nz. ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES Duncan Stewart discovers there is an outstanding business case for firms adopting the latest breed of hybrid electric vehicles from Mitsubishi. You know the planet has actually been cooling down since 1998,” says a random guy in the carpark, with a slightly turgid look at the Outlander PHEV. “And less CO2 emissions means you’re actually starving the rainforests, not helping them.” Uh huh. “And if you really wanted an economical car, you’d get a small diesel.” OK, thanks for the (unsolicited) marching orders, Carpark Guy. If I was brutally honest, after a week of owning the Outlander PHEV (Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicle) the only difference you would probably notice from its internal combustion cousin, is that you would see a lot less of the local Z station (except the Z stations with EV fast chargers of course). That, and as I recently discovered, you will have now also inadvertently planted your flag in enemy territory in a global war of words about climate change. Carpark Guy and others like him, armed with faux science, regurgitated Clarkson rhetoric and a paradoxical fondness for contrarianism, want to forcibly make you understand that your plug-in hybrid electric vehicle is somehow evil. Presumably because it threatens to tear away the comfy fur seal rug upon which they sleepwalk through life. For Carpark Guy, the Outlander PHEV is a symbol of ‘green’, and green equals anti-capitalism, enforced obligations and worst of all, shouldering disproportionate responsibility for our collective planetary over-consumption. I don’t blame Carpark Guy, in fact as a clean technology investor, I make money selling green things to him without him even knowing it. But we do hold very different perspectives about the environment, about money, and about how humans should choose to navigate their way between the two. Electric vehicles could equally be seen as a symbol of a more enlightened approach to humanity, one that recognises that yes, we 7.2bn consumers do have a profound effect on the environment – but we needn’t pack up and leave, we simply need to seek out less toxic ways of running our economies. In commercial terms EVs are a wave of green innovation upon which New Zealand companies should be riding. The Outlander PHEV is the perfect solution for a company that wants green credibility, while enjoying stunning fuel efficiency. The return on investment from fuel savings will excite the sternest of accountants. To become a green trailblazer, plug the Outlander PHEV into a solar system at work, and you will give the marketing, HR and sales team a great story to legitimise your dedication to sustainability. The Outlander PHEV is also stylish with a smart leather interior and the dash is interesting without being distracting. The body shape is similar to most mid-range 4WDs – which is remarkable given car manufacturers’ love of making EVs look like terrified cats. It has two 60kw electric engines, plus a two-litre 88kw petrol engine, which delivers go-juice once the 60km or so of battery power is used up. If you can make toast you will also be highly competent at charging the vehicle; six hours overnight or 30mins for 80 percent on a fast charger. It has a reversing camera, which is useful for avoiding spoodles when silently backing out of the driveway. It fits all your work gear, tows boats and goes up sand dunes. The Outlander PHEV delivers these features while only emitting 44g/km of CO2, a whisper compared to petrol versions of the same class that are around 172g/km. Calculating total driving range is notoriously difficult because regenerative braking and different acceleration profiles means that the ratio of EV and petrol-assisted EV will vary between drivers and terrain. But in summary, chill out, range is not an issue for this vehicle. EV technology will only get better, slicker, cheaper and less impactful on the environment. The Outlander PHEV is a huge step in this direction, and if you take the time to understand the technological and engineering aspects, it is truly amazing. Speaking of which, if you are interested in electric vehicles, check out www.evolocity.co.nz – it’s an event where you can build your own EV and race it on a track against other nutters. Or you can watch a Ferrari get beaten by an EV, and see the world’s fastest EV bike, the Killacycle. Fantastic fun. EVolocity is designed to be a pathway for Kiwis to develop new technologies that will be in high demand in the global shift to EVs – things such as control software, composites, electric engines, charging infrastructure and other high- value kit. The Outlander PHEV is a fine car, and your company should consider buying one, not only because it performs well, has brand opportunities and is economical to run, but because it launches a silent salvo of insight deep into territory occupied by Carpark Guy. And for the record, the planet has not been cooling down, it’s been getting significantly and measurably warmer. This is a problem, so let’s get on with fixing it. [Duncan Stewart is a director of clean-tech investment firm The Greenhouse, a trustee of green growth business group Pure Advantage, and a board member of the New Zealand electric vehicle association, Drive Electric.] The numbers $1.41 The cost to fully charge the batteries on the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV 52 The kilometres the vehicle can travel on a full charge 6.5 The hours needed to charge the car $364 Electricity costs per year (based on 38 kilometres travelled each day) $280 Fuel costs per year (based on EECA tests) 6 Star The Energywise rating from EECA Outlander’s positive experience DUNCAN STEWART TRANSPORT Electric vehicles such as the Mitsubishi Outland PHEV could be seen as a symbol of a more enlightened approach to humanity, says Duncan Stewart. Photo: Ted Baghurst BUSINESS 13element The staggering efficiency of the new Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) – at 1.9L/100km – has rightly received plenty of press. It’s a game-changing equation which, put together with solar power, provides for virtually cash and carbon-free motoring. The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV will do even better than 1.9L/100km provided you’re driving less than 52km per day – the range of the vehicle’s battery bank. Add up your commute, your trips to the shops – you’re under that, right? The average daily commute in New Zealand is a 38km round trip, so most of us are. At $1.41 for a full charge (6.5 hours from an internal household power point), you’re doing well. But you could do even better. Consider putting solar photovoltaics on the roof of your home or business – wherever your Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is parked most of the time. With the appropriate solar array (see sidebar) your weekly travel is now completely free – in terms of both cash and carbon. The Outlander PHEV will, of course, require some petrol for motoring from time to time – when you go on holiday, for example. In Series Hybrid mode, the two 60kW electric motors run the wheels and the petrol engine charges the state-of-the-art Lithium- Ion battery. The battery will be fully recharged in just 40 minutes, having used around three litres of fuel to do it. In Parallel Hybrid mode, which kicks in at higher speeds, the petrol engine helps to drive the wheels. It’s a combination of two electric motors and a 2.0L petrol engine (not to mention the 3 clever drive modes that bring it all together) and means the Outlander PHEV isn’t bound by the range limitations of all-electric vehicles. Even using fuel the vehicle has emissions of just 44 grams of CO2 per kilometre. The Outlander also uses regenerative braking to conserve even more energy. Thanks to the use of electric motors, torque is right there when you want it. Little wonder Mitsubishi has positioned it as the performance model of the Outlander stable. And it’s quiet, so quiet; in fact, it has an alarm that warns pedestrians of its approach when it’s in Electric Vehicle mode. Its cruise control adapts to the vehicle you’re following and it will even stop you to mitigate a collision if its radar detects a hazard but no brake input. These are just some of the features that contribute to the 5-Star ANCAP safety rating. The XLS starts the range at $59,990, but the VRX is where things get truly interesting and it lands at $66,990. The VRX gets all the exciting kit–satnav, forward collision mitigation, adaptive cruise control, a power tailgate, heated front leather seats and the full PHEV colour display screens–plus the PHEV remote app that is available for iOS and Android phones. ELEMENT PROMOTION Mitsubishi Outlander’s day in the sun The numbers $1.41The cost of a full charge on the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV 52The kilometres the vehicle can travel on a full charge 4The number of 250 Watt PV panels out of a solar array which would be utilised to provide the car’s charge 6.5The hours needed to charge the car – less than sunlight hours even during winter $196Electricity costs per year (without solar panels–based on 38 kilometres travelled each day) “With the appropriate solar array your weekly travel is now completely free – in terms of both cash and carbon.” Check out Element next month, July 28 when Element editor James Russell connects the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV to his own solar array and puts it to the test. 14 element The staggering efficiency of the new Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) – at 1.9L/100km – has rightly received plenty of press. It’s a game-changing equation which, put together with solar power, provides for virtually cash and carbon-free motoring. The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV will do even better than 1.9L/100km provided you’re driving less than 52km per day – the range of the vehicle’s battery bank. Add up your commute, your trips to the shops – you’re under that, right? The average daily commute in New Zealand is a 38km round trip, so most of us are. At $1.41 for a full charge (6.5 hours from an internal household power point), you’re doing well. But you could do even better. Consider putting solar photovoltaics on the roof of your home or business – wherever your Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is parked most of the time. With the appropriate solar array (see sidebar) your weekly travel is now completely free – in terms of both cash and carbon. The Outlander PHEV will, of course, require some petrol for motoring from time to time – when you go on holiday, for example. In Series Hybrid mode, the two 60kW electric motors run the wheels and the petrol engine charges the state-of-the-art Lithium- Ion battery. The battery will be fully recharged in just 40 minutes, having used around three litres of fuel to do it. In Parallel Hybrid mode, which kicks in at higher speeds, the petrol engine helps to drive the wheels. It’s a combination of two electric motors and a 2.0L petrol engine (not to mention the 3 clever drive modes that bring it all together) and means the Outlander PHEV isn’t bound by the range limitations of all-electric vehicles. Even using fuel the vehicle has emissions of just 44 grams of CO2 per kilometre. The Outlander also uses regenerative braking to conserve even more energy. Thanks to the use of electric motors, torque is right there when you want it. Little wonder Mitsubishi has positioned it as the performance model of the Outlander stable. And it’s quiet, so quiet; in fact, it has an alarm that warns pedestrians of its approach when it’s in Electric Vehicle mode. Its cruise control adapts to the vehicle you’re following and it will even stop you to mitigate a collision if its radar detects a hazard but no brake input. These are just some of the features that contribute to the 5-Star ANCAP safety rating. The XLS starts the range at $59,990, but the VRX is where things get truly interesting and it lands at $66,990. The VRX gets all the exciting kit–satnav, forward collision mitigation, adaptive cruise control, a power tailgate, heated front leather seats and the full PHEV colour display screens–plus the PHEV remote app that is available for iOS and Android phones. ELEMENT PROMOTION Mitsubishi Outlander’s day in the sun The numbers $1.41The cost of a full charge on the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV 52The kilometres the vehicle can travel on a full charge 4The number of 250 Watt PV panels out of a solar array which would be utilised to provide the car’s charge 6.5The hours needed to charge the car – less than sunlight hours even during winter $196Electricity costs per year (without solar panels–based on 38 kilometres travelled each day) “With the appropriate solar array your weekly travel is now completely free – in terms of both cash and carbon.” Check out Element next month, July 28 when Element editor James Russell connects the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV to his own solar array and puts it to the test. 14 element Duncan Stewart discovers there is an outstanding business case for firms adopting the latest breed of hybrid electric vehicles from Mitsubishi. You know the planet has actually been cooling down since 1998,” says a random guy in the carpark, with a slightly turgid look at the Outlander PHEV. “And less CO2 emissions means you’re actually starving the rainforests, not helping them.” Uh huh. “And if you really wanted an economical car, you’d get a small diesel.” OK, thanks for the (unsolicited) marching orders, Carpark Guy. If I was brutally honest, after a week of owning the Outlander PHEV (Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicle) the only difference you would probably notice from its internal combustion cousin, is that you would see a lot less of the local Z station (except the Z stations with EV fast chargers of course). That, and as I recently discovered, you will have now also inadvertently planted your flag in enemy territory in a global war of words about climate change. Carpark Guy and others like him, armed with faux science, regurgitated Clarkson rhetoric and a paradoxical fondness for contrarianism, want to forcibly make you understand that your plug-in hybrid electric vehicle is somehow evil. Presumably because it threatens to tear away the comfy fur seal rug upon which they sleepwalk through life. For Carpark Guy, the Outlander PHEV is a symbol of ‘green’, and green equals anti-capitalism, enforced obligations and worst of all, shouldering disproportionate responsibility for our collective planetary over-consumption. I don’t blame Carpark Guy, in fact as a clean technology investor, I make money selling green things to him without him even knowing it. But we do hold very different perspectives about the environment, about money, and about how humans should choose to navigate their way between the two. Electric vehicles could equally be seen as a symbol of a more enlightened approach to humanity, one that recognises that yes, we 7.2bn consumers do have a profound effect on the environment – but we needn’t pack up and leave, we simply need to seek out less toxic ways of running our economies. In commercial terms EVs are a wave of green innovation upon which New Zealand companies should be riding. The Outlander PHEV is the perfect solution for a company that wants green credibility, while enjoying stunning fuel efficiency. The return on investment from fuel savings will excite the sternest of accountants. To become a green trailblazer, plug the Outlander PHEV into a solar system at work, and you will give the marketing, HR and sales team a great story to legitimise your dedication to sustainability. The Outlander PHEV is also stylish with a smart leather interior and the dash is interesting without being distracting. The body shape is similar to most mid-range 4WDs – which is remarkable given car manufacturers’ love of making EVs look like terrified cats. It has two 60kw electric engines, plus a two-litre 88kw petrol engine, which delivers go-juice once the 60km or so of battery power is used up. If you can make toast you will also be highly competent at charging the vehicle; six hours overnight or 30mins for 80 percent on a fast charger. It has a reversing camera, which is useful for avoiding spoodles when silently backing out of the driveway. It fits all your work gear, tows boats and goes up sand dunes. The Outlander PHEV delivers these features while only emitting 44g/km of CO2, a whisper compared to petrol versions of the same class that are around 172g/km. Calculating total driving range is notoriously difficult because regenerative braking and different acceleration profiles means that the ratio of EV and petrol-assisted EV will vary between drivers and terrain. But in summary, chill out, range is not an issue for this vehicle. EV technology will only get better, slicker, cheaper and less impactful on the environment. The Outlander PHEV is a huge step in this direction, and if you take the time to understand the technological and engineering aspects, it is truly amazing. Speaking of which, if you are interested in electric vehicles, check out www.evolocity.co.nz – it’s an event where you can build your own EV and race it on a track against other nutters. Or you can watch a Ferrari get beaten by an EV, and see the world’s fastest EV bike, the Killacycle. Fantastic fun. EVolocity is designed to be a pathway for Kiwis to develop new technologies that will be in high demand in the global shift to EVs – things such as control software, composites, electric engines, charging infrastructure and other high- value kit. The Outlander PHEV is a fine car, and your company should consider buying one, not only because it performs well, has brand opportunities and is economical to run, but because it launches a silent salvo of insight deep into territory occupied by Carpark Guy. And for the record, the planet has not been cooling down, it’s been getting significantly and measurably warmer. This is a problem, so let’s get on with fixing it. [Duncan Stewart is a director of clean-tech investment firm The Greenhouse, a trustee of green growth business group Pure Advantage, and a board member of the New Zealand electric vehicle association, Drive Electric.] The numbers $1.41 The cost to fully charge the batteries on the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV 52 The kilometres the vehicle can travel on a full charge 6.5 The hours needed to charge the car $364 Electricity costs per year (based on 38 kilometres travelled each day) $280 Fuel costs per year (based on EECA tests) 6 Star The Energywise rating from EECA Outlander’s positive experience DUNCAN STEWART TRANSPORT Electric vehicles such as the Mitsubishi Outland PHEV could be seen as a symbol of a more enlightened approach to humanity, says Duncan Stewart. Photo: Ted Baghurst BUSINESS 13element Editorial Promotions Element Editorial Promotions are high quality editorial features written by Element’s expert writers and include marketing and ROI objectives. The content and design is signed off by the client and they are clearly marked as an Element Promotion. Content is also loaded to elementmagazine.co.nz. Opinion Pieces An Opinion Piece is perfect if you have an important story to tell, want to position a staff member as an expert, or increase their personal profile. This is a full page column and includes a headshot of the author and your company contact details. It is also loaded to nzherald.co.nz. Element can also find the perfect ghost writer to write the column on your behalf.
  9. 9. Element Content Marketing is a strategic Public Relations campaign that reinforces the industry your brand is involved in but is not specifically about the brand. CONTENT MARKETING Living in the tranquillity of New Zealand it’s hard to comprehend the problem of exponential population growth and the strain it is having on the fragile ecosystems that sustain our species. Exponential growth simply means that if the population is growing by 1% a year it will double within a 70-year cycle. To put this in perspective, it took 50,000 years to reach one billion people but only 200 years to jump to our existing seven billion. Based on our current annual growth of 1.1% our population could reach 14 billion by the end of this century. Such population growth makes our current design systems redundant due to the pollution it will create. The industrial revolution was the game changer, creating a population boom which also drove vast amounts of rural folk towards ill-equipped cities – which are now home to half the humans on earth. The world has changed CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS GAVIN HEALY OPINION Can landscape architecture help resolve climate change? Element investigates the amalgamation of ecological and landscape architecture projects created by some of the world’s premier architectural designers. so quickly over the last 200 years that our species is struggling to evolve fast enough to respond. The next 100 years will see great change. We have two options, either design a world that works in harmony with nature or create more man-made controlled environments to isolate us from an increasingly hostile biosphere. Most modern-day architects and landscape architects are not addressing the pressing issues of our times: climate collapse, finite resources, food security, energy demands and pollution. The famous architect and ecologist, Richard Bukminster Fuller said: “Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we’ve been ignorant of their value.” The study of ecology holds the key as pollution does not exist in nature; everything is a resource for something else. “The study of ecology holds the key as pollution does not exist in nature; everything is a resource for something else.” Having ecology as a core focus for all design projects is not green ideology or politically motivated but a response to the demands of our modern problems. Our human environment needs to become an extension of the land in which it sits, not man’s ego forced upon the land. This is what we need to achieve if we are to avoid the devastation of climate collapse. A new breed of ecological architects and landscape architects are rising to this challenge. William McDonogh, winner of the US Presidential Award for Sustainable Development and co-creator of the Cradle to Cradle concept (see interview on page 10) has brought a new vision of design to life. He has been quoted as saying the goal is to frame design as “a beneficial, regenerative force—one that seeks to create ecological footprints to delight in, not lament.” In his design system nutrients and resources are constantly recycled in the biosphere or technosphere. The biosphere (natural nutrients) are never contaminated with the technosphere (man-made products) as this creates waste – chemicals are never mixed with nature. He draws heavily on the biophilia hypothesis – the study of the human desire and physiological need for contact with nature which is something we lose in our modern cities and buildings. This is fundamental for the mental health of many people that have a strong physiological, cultural and spiritual connection with nature. 24 element His Bernheim Arboretum Visitor Centre project is a good example of this as the indoor and outdoor worlds are blurred. McDonough has an impressive portfolio of design projects under his belt including the Google YouTube office, which features a 70,000-square-foot green roof that helps to prevent water runoff, insulates the building from heat, cold and noise and provides a habitat for several species. The ecological retrofit of the 85-year-old Ford complex is home to one of most impressive green roofs in the world. The green roof is part of an $18 million US natural rainwater treatment system, which consists of more than 10 acres of a low-growing ground cover, which retains and cleanses 20 billion gallons of rainwater annually – saving Ford from a $50 million mechanical treatment facility. Jason F. McLennan, CEO of the International Living Future Institute – an NGO that focuses on the transformation to a world that is “socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative”. McLennan is the founder of the Living Building Challenge, considered to be one of the world’s most progressive green building programs. His system creates buildings that function like flowers which sounds hippy but is extremely technical (see interview on page 11). The Tuhoe project is the first certified building in New Zealand nearing completion. Jason explains that: “we need a paradigm shift in our approach to the built environment. If we want societies capable of thriving in a world of limited resources, we have to develop appropriately-scaled, regionally-relevant strategies for water, energy, transportation and agriculture, and we have to integrate these strategies into our architecture and urban planning.” According to The Guardian, Ken Yeang from Malaysia is “one of the 50 people who could save the planet.” He considers himself to be an ecologist first and architect second. His projects seamlessly integrate landscaping and architecture into the one discipline. He is the man who coined the phrase eco-mimicry and recognised over four decades ago that human’s environmental destruction would affect the planet’s natural balance, causing climate collapse. He is famous for his vertical landscaping and bioclimatic skyscrapers. Milestone projects include the National Library in Singapore, a 120m green tower with large landscaped sky courts and the nearly complete, Spire Edge Tower that encapsulates his development of the idea of vertical green eco infrastructure. He is also a world leader in ecological urban design. Christchurch was recently presented with an “Urban Regeneration Award” from the World Green Building CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS “Our environment is the crucial dimension of how we design the future – how we live in it, how we care for it.” Council for its policies and initiatives aimed at rebuilding sustainably after the earthquakes. Mick Abbott, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Environment, Society and Design at Lincoln University told Element that, “in Christchurch we are trying to design in resilience for things we can’t control. For a start it’s about appropriate use of the land – building a sports field on the edge of a waterway, for example, rather than buildings, or making sure the buildings that need to be there are designed to withstand a flood. It’s a $30b rebuild, a massive international experiment and the eyes of the world will be on how we do this. Our environment is the crucial dimension of how we design the future – how we live in it, how we care for it. From a landscape point of view it’s critical. For a long time we have built what we wanted and tried to make the environment fit around it. Now it’s time to turn that around. We also have to take our ecosystem services into account.” At Lincoln University they see their role as educators of the next generation of ecological landscape architects who are also climate change solution seekers. This new generation will be creating multi-disciplined projects in the footsteps of our current trailblazers, which are showing us a glimpse of a futuristic world, inhabited by an ecologically enlightened people. The Climate Change Solutions editorial series is a joint project between Element magazine and Lincoln University which is intended to illuminate a pathway for a sustainable future. To join the debate and see videos from these designers, visit elementmagazine.co.nz Clockwise from top left: Ford’s 10-acre green roof; the Bernheim Arboretum Visitor Centre; Ken Yeang’s radical designs. 25element His Bernheim Arboretum Visitor Centre project is a good example of this as the indoor and outdoor worlds are blurred. McDonough has an impressive portfolio of design projects under his belt including the Google YouTube office, which features a 70,000-square-foot green roof that helps to prevent water runoff, insulates the building from heat, cold and noise and provides a habitat for several species. The ecological retrofit of the 85-year-old Ford complex is home to one of most impressive green roofs in the world. The green roof is part of an $18 million US natural rainwater treatment system, which consists of more than 10 acres of a low-growing ground cover, which retains and cleanses 20 billion gallons of rainwater annually – saving Ford from a $50 million mechanical treatment facility. Jason F. McLennan, CEO of the International Living Future Institute – an NGO that focuses on the transformation to a world that is “socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative”. McLennan is the founder of the Living Building Challenge, considered to be one of the world’s most progressive green building programs. His system creates buildings that function like flowers which sounds hippy but is extremely technical (see interview on page 11). The Tuhoe project is the first certified building in New Zealand nearing completion. Jason explains that: “we need a paradigm shift in our approach to the built environment. If we want societies capable of thriving in a world of limited resources, we have to develop appropriately-scaled, regionally-relevant strategies for water, energy, transportation and agriculture, and we have to integrate these strategies into our architecture and urban planning.” According to The Guardian, Ken Yeang from Malaysia is “one of the 50 people who could save the planet.” He considers himself to be an ecologist first and architect second. His projects seamlessly integrate landscaping and architecture into the one discipline. He is the man who coined the phrase eco-mimicry and recognised over four decades ago that human’s environmental destruction would affect the planet’s natural balance, causing climate collapse. He is famous for his vertical landscaping and bioclimatic skyscrapers. Milestone projects include the National Library in Singapore, a 120m green tower with large landscaped sky courts and the nearly complete, Spire Edge Tower that encapsulates his development of the idea of vertical green eco infrastructure. He is also a world leader in ecological urban design. Christchurch was recently presented with an “Urban Regeneration Award” from the World Green Building CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS “Our environment is the crucial dimension of how we design the future – how we live in it, how we care for it.” Council for its policies and initiatives aimed at rebuilding sustainably after the earthquakes. Mick Abbott, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Environment, Society and Design at Lincoln University told Element that, “in Christchurch we are trying to design in resilience for things we can’t control. For a start it’s about appropriate use of the land – building a sports field on the edge of a waterway, for example, rather than buildings, or making sure the buildings that need to be there are designed to withstand a flood. It’s a $30b rebuild, a massive international experiment and the eyes of the world will be on how we do this. Our environment is the crucial dimension of how we design the future – how we live in it, how we care for it. From a landscape point of view it’s critical. For a long time we have built what we wanted and tried to make the environment fit around it. Now it’s time to turn that around. We also have to take our ecosystem services into account.” At Lincoln University they see their role as educators of the next generation of ecological landscape architects who are also climate change solution seekers. This new generation will be creating multi-disciplined projects in the footsteps of our current trailblazers, which are showing us a glimpse of a futuristic world, inhabited by an ecologically enlightened people. The Climate Change Solutions editorial series is a joint project between Element magazine and Lincoln University which is intended to illuminate a pathway for a sustainable future. To join the debate and see videos from these designers, visit elementmagazine.co.nz Clockwise from top left: Ford’s 10-acre green roof; the Bernheim Arboretum Visitor Centre; Ken Yeang’s radical designs. 25element Living in the tranquillity of New Zealand it’s hard to comprehend the problem of exponential population growth and the strain it is having on the fragile ecosystems that sustain our species. Exponential growth simply means that if the population is growing by 1% a year it will double within a 70-year cycle. To put this in perspective, it took 50,000 years to reach one billion people but only 200 years to jump to our existing seven billion. Based on our current annual growth of 1.1% our population could reach 14 billion by the end of this century. Such population growth makes our current design systems redundant due to the pollution it will create. The industrial revolution was the game changer, creating a population boom which also drove vast amounts of rural folk towards ill-equipped cities – which are now home to half the humans on earth. The world has changed CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS GAVIN HEALY OPINION Can landscape architecture help resolve climate change? Element investigates the amalgamation of ecological and landscape architecture projects created by some of the world’s premier architectural designers. so quickly over the last 200 years that our species is struggling to evolve fast enough to respond. The next 100 years will see great change. We have two options, either design a world that works in harmony with nature or create more man-made controlled environments to isolate us from an increasingly hostile biosphere. Most modern-day architects and landscape architects are not addressing the pressing issues of our times: climate collapse, finite resources, food security, energy demands and pollution. The famous architect and ecologist, Richard Bukminster Fuller said: “Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we’ve been ignorant of their value.” The study of ecology holds the key as pollution does not exist in nature; everything is a resource for something else. “The study of ecology holds the key as pollution does not exist in nature; everything is a resource for something else.” Having ecology as a core focus for all design projects is not green ideology or politically motivated but a response to the demands of our modern problems. Our human environment needs to become an extension of the land in which it sits, not man’s ego forced upon the land. This is what we need to achieve if we are to avoid the devastation of climate collapse. A new breed of ecological architects and landscape architects are rising to this challenge. William McDonogh, winner of the US Presidential Award for Sustainable Development and co-creator of the Cradle to Cradle concept (see interview on page 10) has brought a new vision of design to life. He has been quoted as saying the goal is to frame design as “a beneficial, regenerative force—one that seeks to create ecological footprints to delight in, not lament.” In his design system nutrients and resources are constantly recycled in the biosphere or technosphere. The biosphere (natural nutrients) are never contaminated with the technosphere (man-made products) as this creates waste – chemicals are never mixed with nature. He draws heavily on the biophilia hypothesis – the study of the human desire and physiological need for contact with nature which is something we lose in our modern cities and buildings. This is fundamental for the mental health of many people that have a strong physiological, cultural and spiritual connection with nature. 24 element A 12 month content plan is created with the client that is designed to educate and influence Element readers about a certain subject over the duration of the campaign. It includes: • A full page of advertising and a full page of content marketing in each issue in print. • Editorial is also loaded to elementmagazine.co.nz with an SEO headline strategy and backlinks to the client’s website when appropriate. • Exclusive digital advertising is available around content marketing.
  10. 10. *Terms and conditions apply. For full details contact gavin.healy@nzme.co.nz Shopgreen.co.nz is the new destination for New Zealand’s ethical consumers. SHOPGREEN.CO.NZ It combines the power of: • The New Zealand Herald: New Zealand’s largest daily newspaper. • GrabOne: New Zealand’s largest daily e-commerce platform. • Element magazine: New Zealand’s largest and most respected sustainability magazine. It is a permanent e-commerce site hosting client’s ethical and sustainable products and services. Most products will carry accreditations and a guide will explain what the accreditations represent. In addition to the website, these products and services will be featured within the New Zealand Herald via Element magazine, a monthly eDM to over 400,000 subscribers and monthly promotion of products available via the Editor’s Choice within Element magazine and online at elementmagazine.co.nz • A full page in Element. • A 12 month e-commerce promotion. • Products can be changed on a monthly basis. • Product promoted on GrabOne EDM to 400,000 emails. • Product promoted in Element magazine as editor’s choice. Total value $18,000 Total investment for launch special package: $5,500+GST Available until March 31, 2015. Special offer*
  11. 11. Element editorial sections were selected after extensive research from NZ readers and focus groups. ELEMENT CONTENT SECTIONS Business Planet Wellbeing Ethical Finance Clean Technology Infrastructure Sustainable Agriculture Better Cities Transport Architecture Business Leaders Sustainable Business Beauty and Fashion Social Enterprise Global Report Ecology Education Obesity Nutrition Efficient Homes Community Heroes Organic Producers Organic Gardening Organic Recipes Sustainable Wine Charity Spotlight ShopGreen Products & Services
  12. 12. To find out more speak to your NZME. Account Manager or contact: CONTACT US Gavin Healy (09) 373 6096 021 778 015 gavin.healy@nzme.co.nz Alex Greig (09) 373 6097 021 305 205 alex.greig@nzme.co.nz

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