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WINTER 2003
NHDES ANNOUNCES LOCAL SOURCE WATER PROTECTION FUNDING GRANTS
The New Hampshire Department of Environmental S...
®
and systems serving less than 3,300 people were not required to comply. Past Local Source
Water Protection applicants ha...
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New Hampshire ll NHDES Announces Local Source Water Protection Funding Grants [Newsletter]

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http://www.geoinsight.com/files/6813/2198/8618/6._NHDES_Announces_Local_Source_Water_Protection_Funding_Grants.pdf

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New Hampshire ll NHDES Announces Local Source Water Protection Funding Grants [Newsletter]

  1. 1. ® WINTER 2003 NHDES ANNOUNCES LOCAL SOURCE WATER PROTECTION FUNDING GRANTS The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) offers Local Source Water Protection Grants to help municipalities and water companies address issues resulting from the NHDES's review of Drinking Water Source Assessment reports. Eligible entities include water suppliers, municipalities, regional planning commissions, non-profit organizations, county conservation districts, State agencies, and watershed associations. Successful applicants can use grant funding to refine source delineation, inventory and evaluate potential drinking water threats, and implement protective measures or monitoring programs. The deadline for grant applications is generally in the fall of each year. The grant program was especially timely this year because the NHDES completed source area delineations and source area assessment reports that were sent out to water suppliers. As noted in a NHDES Newsletter for the Drinking Water Source Protection Program, The Source, “the next challenge ... is making sure the source assessments spur water suppliers and municipalities to improve local protection programs.” The source assessment reports use 13 criteria to rate a source's vulnerability to contamination, ranging each criterion high, medium, or low. These rankings can be viewed on-line at www.des.state.nh.us/dwspp/partl.htm. High vulnerability marks suggest that protective measures are needed. The NHDES recently issued a fact sheet (WD-WSEB 12-8) describing prudent responses (the fact sheet is also available at the NHDES web site). Armed with the source assessment report and suggested responses described in the fact sheet, water suppliers can begin to frame good grant applications. Grant monies can also be used to address vulnerability assessment issues. Community public water systems were currently faced with compliance deadlines for requirements of the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism and Response Act (H.R. 3448) focusing on system security and ability to respond to emergencies. Vulnerability assessments for systems serving between 50,000 and 99,999 people were due to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) by December 31, 2003 and for systems serving between 3,300 and 49,999 people by June 30, 2004. Systems larger than 99,999 people were required to comply by March 31, 2003,
  2. 2. ® and systems serving less than 3,300 people were not required to comply. Past Local Source Water Protection applicants have used the grants to fund fencing and alarm systems to prevent unauthorized access and limit system vulnerability. There are some key aspects that the applicant should focus on to prepare a winning grant application. First, community support is essential, and letters of support from local planning boards and other stakeholders are important application attachments. Applicants should also provide a matching contribution; the NHDES will not fund 100 percent of the project costs. Contributions can be monetary or through in-kind services (e.g., matching labor). Ground level involvement by the primary stakeholders is a strong plus and is viewed like "sweat equity" in terms of home improvement projects. Furthermore, projects involving technical data collection, such as water quality monitoring projects, will require the preparation of Quality Assurance Project Plans (QAPPs). QAPPs can be difficult for laymen to prepare and applicants may want to seek assistance from an experienced consultant. It has also been our experience that the NHDES staff is very helpful in providing guidance to potential applicants. If you have any questions about this very useful program, please feel free to contact us. David A. Maclean, P.G., L.S.P., L.E.P. damaclean@geoinc.com

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