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Saudi Arabian Consumer Health Insights - COVID-19 Survey Overview

These insights draw upon findings from McKinsey’s Consumer Surveys from March 15–22, February 8–12, January 4–11, 2021, and in 2020, November 20, December 6, October 22–26, September 5–7, July 11–14, June 4–8, May 15–18, April 25–27, April 11–13, March 27–29, and March 16–17, 2020 on COVID 19.

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Saudi Arabian Consumer Health Insights - COVID-19 Survey Overview

  1. 1. CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY Any use of this material without specific permission of McKinsey & Company is strictly prohibited Updated: March 26, 2021 DOCUMENT INTENDED TO PROVIDE INSIGHT RATHER THAN SPECIFIC CLIENT ADVICE 2021 Consumer Health Insights - COVID-19 Survey Overview
  2. 2. McKinsey & Company 2 Solving the humanitarian challenge is the top priority. Much remains to be done globally to prepare, respond, and recover, from protecting populations at risk, to supporting affected patients/ families/ communities, to deploying the vaccines. To address this crisis, countries including the US will need to respond in an evidence-informed manner, leveraging public health infrastructure and proactive leadership. This document is meant to help with a narrower goal: provide timely insights on consumers’ reported behaviors, concerns, and desired support in response to COVID-19. These insights draw upon findings from McKinsey’s Consumer Surveys from March 15-22, February 8-12, January 4-11, 2021, and in 2020, November 20-December 6, October 22-26, September 5-7, July 11-14, June 4-8, May 15- 18, April 25-27, April 11-13, March 27-29, and March 16-17 2020 on COVID-19. They represent consumers’ stated perspectives and are not meant to indicate or predict actual future consumer behavior. In these surveys, we asked consumers about “Coronavirus / COVID-19” due to the colloquial use of “coronavirus” to refer to COVID-19 among the general public. In addition, we have developed a broader perspective on implications for businesses across sectors that can be found here: https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/risk/our-insights/covid-19-implications-for-business. This supplemental material discusses implications for the wider economy, businesses, and employment; and sets out some of those challenges and how organizations can respond in order to protect their people and navigate through an uncertain situation. For all formal guidance, you can find up-to-date information at CDC’s COVID-19 website, with a section specific to healthcare professionals: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/healthcare-facilities/index.html Overview of this document AS OF MARCH 24, 2021
  3. 3. McKinsey & Company 3 Take-aways from the insights: Actions to consider now AS OF MARCH 24, 2021  Build detailed understanding of consumer segments and sentiment to inform consumer solutions with robust data, survey research, and up-to-date media listening capabilities. Identifying the unique attitudes and barriers for each consumer segment will be critical to effectively communicate and engage consumers to overcome barriers (e.g., to receive deferred care, chose to get a COVID-19 vaccine)  Identify priority journeys and define approach to personalized engagement. For example, cut through message fatigue, complacency, and dis- and mis-information in today’s fragmented news and media environment by identifying trusted messengers, trusted channels and supplying the right messages and actions in formats that will speak to each consumer on a local, personal level for the things that matter most to them  Set-up an agile consumer engagement center to outreach to consumers in a rapid and impact oriented approach, using consumer information to optimize the timing, content, and design of every experience, leveraging advanced analytics and consumer insight. This requires building capabilities to support agile delivery and rapid test and learn, including strong measurement capabilities.  Appropriately engage consumers in the way they want and prefer – as consumers are increasingly engaging across channels, including digital, enhanced capabilities are needed to meet consumer and provider needs to support these preferred engagement approaches
  4. 4. McKinsey & Company 4 Vaccinations are increasing and hesitancy continues to decline Likelihood to receive COVID-19 vaccine % of respondents (ages 18+) 18 19 16 15 45 41 23 17 37 38 43 32 18 36 Feb. 19 Dec. 6 2 Jan. 15 March 21 100% = 2,332 2,467 2,506 2,724 Already vaccinated Cautious Interested Unlikely Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) 1. Percentage point QVAX1b. Under which timeframe of COVID-19 vaccine availability would you be most likely to get vaccinated? QVAXPROC_SAT. How satisfied were you with each element of the vaccination process? 88% Of respondents that were vaccinated were satisfied with their overall vaccination experience 31 pp1 Reduction in cautious and unlikely since December 36% Of unvaccinated Medicaid members are uncertain about their vaccination eligibility CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Survey date
  5. 5. McKinsey & Company 5 Across the ‘Cautious’ and ‘Unlikely’ segments, we see 4 distinct consumer archetypes Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) Concerned and constrained Concerns about both the safety of the vaccine and challenges in getting the vaccine Don’t need and constrained Believe that they don’t need or want the vaccine and that there are too many challenges in getting the vaccine Resistant Limited concerns about getting the vaccine, but are generally less receptive 50% 13% 9% Gaps in information Uninformed or misinformed about the vaccine; may be more open to the vaccine with better information 28% Percent of Cautious and Unlikely to vaccinate segments, % CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021
  6. 6. McKinsey & Company 6 Overall satisfaction with the vaccination experience remains high CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) QVAXPROC_SAT. How satisfied were you with each element of the vaccination process? 10-point scale from extremely dissatisfied to extremely satisfied; “High” is 8-10, “Moderate” is 4-7, and “Low” is 1-3) Satisfaction with different elements of vaccination process % of respondents, n=991 92% Respondents living in large city suburbs or medium-sized city 74% Respondents age 25-34 93% Received at doctor’s office 80% Hispanic respondents 96% Respondents age 65+ 83% Dual Medicare and Medicaid Elements with highest satisfaction Elements with lowest satisfaction 88% Safeguards for preventing COVID-19 at vaccination site (e.g., masks, distancing) 88% Cleanliness of site 87% Ability of healthcare/ vaccination provider to explain the vaccination process 76% Proximity of vaccination site to residence 76% Ease of scheduling 78% Learning where to receive the vaccine More satisfied Less satisfied
  7. 7. McKinsey & Company 7 Anxiety and distress remain high and vary across populations CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) QFEEL1. Over the past week have you felt anxious? QFEEL2a. Please indicate your level of distress related to the Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic. Responses are on a 1-10 scale with 1 being ”least distressed” to 10 being “most distressed.” Distressed is 8-10 38 49 57 39 Scheduled or planning to schedule Fully vaccinated Waiting Unlikely 6 pp Overall decrease in distress since October 1 pp Overall increase in anxiety since October 31% Respondents between the ages of 24-44 reporting distress 31% Respondents with children in household reporting distress 23% Respondents reporting distress 46% Overall percentage of respondents feeling anxious ~50% “Interested’ and ‘Cautious’ respondents feeling anxious compared to 39% of ‘unlikely’ 67% Respondents aged 18-24 feeling anxious Respondents experiencing anxiety % of respondents, n=2,724 % of respondents, n=2,724 overall, varies by category High distress due to COVID-19 by vaccination status High anxiety by vaccination status % of respondents, n=2,724 overall, varies by category Respondents experiencing distress due to the pandemic % of respondents, n=2,724 21 25 30 13 Unlikely Fully vaccinated Scheduled or planning to schedule Waiting
  8. 8. McKinsey & Company 8 Respondent return to activities CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) QRESUME. Please indicate when you would resume each of the following activities 1. If in need of care Going to/on: Expected time to resume activities % of respondents, N=2,724 Transportation Daily activities Healthcare1 10 22 20 8 4 5 4 8 12 6 7 5 9 11 8 8 5 7 8 8 8 8 11 17 16 8 5 4 5 19 15 15 17 22 18 20 18 14 12 14 12 14 15 15 17 11 10 6 15 15 9 9 6 7 5 9 7 8 18 17 15 10 9 20 13 29 21 10 38 39 21 25 39 13 12 17 59 39 22 40 27 52 66 29 26 41 36 18 3 4 2 2 Hotel Transportation service e.g., taxi, rideshare Airline Public transportation Dentist 3 1 Retail store 2 Restaurant Park or beach 4 Gov’t facility Physician’s office 4 3 4 3 2 Drug store 3 3 Urgent care clinic Hospital facility 4 3 Vision provider Surgical center I am already doing this I don’t know Other I am not doing this yet because I don’t need to, but I would if I needed to Never Not until there is a treatment / I’m vaccinated This activity is not applicable to me
  9. 9. McKinsey & Company 9 Resumption of activities and plan to partake in activities by vaccination status and intent CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) QRESUME. Please indicate when you would resume each of the following activities; responses to “I am already doing this” option shown; selected activities shown QPLAN. Which of the following activities, if any, do you plan to do in the next 4 weeks? (Select all that apply); selected activities shown Those who are unlikely to receive a vaccine are resuming activities at higher levels than other segments... % of respondents, n=2,724 overall; varies by bubble ...and plan to partake in more group activities in the next 4-weeks % of respondents, n-2,724 and varies by bubble 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 10 20 30 40 Already vaccinated Interested Cautious Unlikely Going out to a restaurant (to dine in) or bar 39 37 57 32 Fly on an airline 12 13 18 13 Using a transportation service (e.g., taxi, Uber, Lyft) 16 17 15 21 Hotel stay 19 29 21 21 Attend a get-together with people outside of my immediate family (people that I live with) indoors 20 16 18 29 Attend a get-together with people outside of my immediate family (people that I live with) outdoors 21 16 20 23 Eat at a restaurant indoors 36 31 35 53 Go to a fitness center / gym 16 15 13 16 50
  10. 10. McKinsey & Company 10 Those respondents that have deferred care cited primary concerns with safety and affordability CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) QCARE_DEFER. Are you deferring or postponing getting any healthcare treatment that you currently need? QCARE_DEFER_WHAT. What type(s) of healthcare treatment are you deferring or postponing? Respondents could select more than one answer choice QCARE_DEFER_WHY. Why are you deferring or postponing your care? Respondents deferring care and type of care deferred % of respondents, n value varies by row Overall Percent deferring 35 21 16 16 16 Primary care physician for routine care Specialist Dentist Vision provider Primary care for annual wellness visit 22 Top deferred services Top reasons respondents are deferring care % of respondents, n=1,467 13 27 27 One None Multiple 28 19 18 Urban Suburban Rural 23 17 22 31 Commercial Medicare Medicaid Both Medicare and Medicaid % of respondents, n=593 Chronic conditions Urbanicity Insurance status 37% 24% 15% 14% 14% 13% I am concerned about the safety of getting the treatment now due to COVID-19 Cannot afford the costs of the treatment Would rather live with the medical condition for now than getting the treatment Getting treatment would require missing too much work Concerned about side effects or adverse events from getting treatment I would have to travel too far from my home to get treatment
  11. 11. McKinsey & Company 11 Respondents most recent site of care was primarily in-person, except for visits to a psychologist or psychiatrist CURRENT AS OF MARCH 26, 2021 APPT1. For each of the following types of care below, indicate whether your most recent appointment was either at an in-person appointment, or an online / video visit with a physician (e.g., Doctor on Demand, Skype, FaceTime); also called telemedicine. Modality of most recent appointment, by setting % of respondents who reported receiving care in the specified setting (sample size varies by row) 8% 25% 18% 18% 49% 83% 88% 88% 83% 85% 76% 83% 74% 26% 3% 9% 3% 521 6% 12% Visits to an urgent care center 11% 8% 100% = Visits to a specialist 4% Visits to a health clinic at a pharmacy or retail store 5% 13% Visit with a pediatrician for my child Visit with a gynecologist for non-pregnancy or non-maternity care 6% 715 86 Non-annual/routine visits with a primary care physician (e.g., GP, FP, internist) 194 6% 11% 222 Annual wellness visits with a primary care physician (e.g., GP, FP, internist) Routine visits with a primary care physician (e.g., GP, FP, internist) Visits to a psychologist or psychiatrist 526 238 703 227 N= Source: McKinsey COVID-19 Consumer Survey, 3/21/2021 (n=2,724 ages 18+ in USA) In-person Telephone Telemedicine Change in telemed vs. Feb survey (p.p.) -1% -3% -11% -9% 2% -2% -3% 2% 2% Most Recent Care Received

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