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WORKING DRAFT
Last Modified 6/1/2015 12:05 PM Eastern Standard Time
Printed 24/05/2013 16:16 GMT Standard Time
Care delive...
2 | McKinsey & Company
Care delivery of the future is being shaped by the non-linear
convergence of disruptive, digital te...
3 | McKinsey & Company
Likely scenarios for digital disruption of healthcare?
Transformation
Evolution
Revolution
Highly i...
4 | McKinsey & Company
Capital investment in digital solutions is continuing to grow
2011
2014 Q1
2013
2012
+86
+16
+136
+...
5 | McKinsey & Company
Several solution archetypes are emerging, targeting specific value
pools…
Cross-cutting
enablers
In...
6 | McKinsey & Company
For providers, digital technologies represent significant
potential for impact
1 250-bed hospital, ...
7 | McKinsey & Company
Guidelines to manage healthcare technology in the digital era
Focus on digital transformation vs. I...
8 | McKinsey & Company
Around the room, we have several examples of technology with
potential to disrupt today’s healthcar...
9 | McKinsey & Company
As you experience the solutions at each station, keep a few critical
questions in mind
What operati...
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Care delivery of the future

Care delivery of the future

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Care delivery of the future

  1. 1. WORKING DRAFT Last Modified 6/1/2015 12:05 PM Eastern Standard Time Printed 24/05/2013 16:16 GMT Standard Time Care delivery of the future Eight Annual McKinsey Healthcare Conference June 3 CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY Any use of this material without specific permission of McKinsey & Company is strictly prohibited
  2. 2. 2 | McKinsey & Company Care delivery of the future is being shaped by the non-linear convergence of disruptive, digital technologies 3D printing Advanced materials Cloud technology The “Internet of Things” Big data and predictive analytics Mobile and social web Next-generation genomics Interactive, gesture- based computing
  3. 3. 3 | McKinsey & Company Likely scenarios for digital disruption of healthcare? Transformation Evolution Revolution Highly inter-connected and transparent ecosystems enabling increased consumer choice and empowerment, smarter utilization, risk socialization and virtual delivery models Significant disruption to linear payor-provider value chains through emergence of new B2C models, growth in multi-market ecosystems (e.g. bundle exchanges), increased benefits/services fragmentation and new entrants (e.g., Apple) Fundamental role changes as consumers become primary owners of data, payors become risk advisors vs. risk selectors, and providers become “patient health concierges” that coordinate complex webs of care
  4. 4. 4 | McKinsey & Company Capital investment in digital solutions is continuing to grow 2011 2014 Q1 2013 2012 +86 +16 +136 +755 +53 +154 +73 +79 CAGR1 % Healthcare technology investments by category, 2011-2014 Q1 $ Millions, N = $4.6B SOURCE: Rock Health 2011-2014Q1 Digital Health Funding Data 178 200Population health management Care coordination 231 Digital medical devices 236 Wearables / biosensing 182 278 Analytics / big data 439 EHR / clinical workflow 449 Remote patient monitoring Telemedicine
  5. 5. 5 | McKinsey & Company Several solution archetypes are emerging, targeting specific value pools… Cross-cutting enablers Innovative platforms Referral management Appointment scheduling Clinical decision support Physician training Operational transparency Workflow efficiency Cheaper diagnostics Personalized health management Alternative channels Automation and efficiency 1 Developing patient loyalty4 Information transparency and performance management 2 Coordinated, personalized care and access 3
  6. 6. 6 | McKinsey & Company For providers, digital technologies represent significant potential for impact 1 250-bed hospital, with ~$1M revenue per bed; 5.5% margin | 2 50% of hospital spend assumed labor, 30% of that in nursing, 46% other caregivers, the rest in non-clinical staff. 4.5% opportunity in nursing spend assumed, 9% in other caregivers, 25% in non-clinical staff | 3 Based on bottom-up assessment of individual technologies | 4 Based on assessment of impact of integrated care on chronic populations (7% cost reduction applied to 75% of spend, attributed to chronic condition spend), with 20% contribution margin, 50% revenue loss assumed reclaimed from payor in gain sharing + 30% reduction in length of remote consultations compared to face to face appts, with 25% follow-ups assumed amenable to remote interaction, one third of appts are assumed follow-up, savings applied to 14% of total labor spend attributable to physicians | 5 60% of revenue considered addressable, 30% leakage assumed, 25-50% potential to reduce, 20% contribution margin 11-13 33-40 3-5 15-17 3-5 $250M costs are assumed for a typical hospital1 13-16% ~5%2 1-2%5 6-7%3 1-2%4 Total Savings as % of cost base, % EBITDA impact, $M Automation and efficiency1 Developing patient loyalty4 Information transparency and performance mgmt. 2 Coordinated, personalized care and access 3 Assuming 50% gain share (from reduced utilization) with payor; under FFS, this becomes $2- 4M loss Reduced to $27-31M under FFS
  7. 7. 7 | McKinsey & Company Guidelines to manage healthcare technology in the digital era Focus on digital transformation vs. IT strategies Reorient IT to manage demand, not supply Systems of engagement > systems of record Architect for multiple speeds and maximum flexibility The answer is likely outside your walls Manage digital innovation as a portfolio
  8. 8. 8 | McKinsey & Company Around the room, we have several examples of technology with potential to disrupt today’s healthcare landscape Brief description  Patient-flow automation and real-time asset-tracking  Electronic health records and population health management tools  iPhone-based otoscopes for at-home and clinician use  Video access to physicians and psychologists via smart-phone or computer  Telehealth-enabled “Care Traffic Control” capability to coordinate care in the Hospital, in the Home and in transitions from Hospital to Home  Solutions for multi-channel patient access and referral management  Tools for real-time clinician communication and patient experience management  Health and wellness personal coaching linked to an app
  9. 9. 9 | McKinsey & Company As you experience the solutions at each station, keep a few critical questions in mind What operational changes will I need to make to integrate this technology into my delivery model and effectively capture its value? Who will reap the rewards of potential value created? Is my current environment ready for it? Could this drive a true revolution in care delivery and a step-change in my cost curve, or a minor improvement to the status quo?

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