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Group 3 Nursing Education Unit 3.pptx

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Group 3 Nursing Education Unit 3.pptx

  1. 1. Education & Socialization to the Professional Nursing Role (Nursing Education)
  2. 2. Presented to: Mam Naveeda Aslam Presented by: Group 3 Farah Aashiq Nazia Mansha Hina Ashraf Sadaf Sabah Huma Waheed Post RN BSN Semester IV College of Nursing, King Edward Medical University, LHR.
  3. 3. Objectives: At the end of this presentation, we will be able to: Define Professionalism and Socialization to professional nursing. Describe that how the History affect the socialization of nurses. Identify Cognitive stage & discuss Social influences on Professional Socialization and Role Development. Discuss the Stages of Skill & Knowledge as defined by “Benner” and identify Factors that Facilitate Professional Role Development.
  4. 4. Introduction Professional socialization involves a process by which a person acquires the knowledge, skills, and sense of identity that are characteristic of a profession. The professional nurse is responsible for practice that incorporates this specialized body of knowledge and standards of practice with care that demonstrates respect and caring. “Benner” described the development of professional clinical practice of nurses. Benner's model identifies the stages of novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient and expert.
  5. 5. Professionalism “Professionalization is considered as one of the fundamental and basic concepts nursing. This phenomenon is a social process through which any occupation transforms itself into a profession of the highest integrity and competence. Professionalization facilitates the organization of the healthcare teams and resources and promotes the use of cooperative problem solving strategies.” (Keogh, 1997 pg.302)
  6. 6. Key Skills for Nursing Professionals
  7. 7. How to Show Professionalism in Nursing?
  8. 8. Socialization Socialization is the change of behavior and conceptual state of the individual that follows from the environmental condition and leads to a greater ability of the person to participate in that social system (Biddle, 1979).
  9. 9. Professional Socialization According to Cohens; “Professional socialization is the process of acquiring skills and required knowledge to achieve a professional role with valued and professional norms. This occurs through professional educational experience in work environment”.
  10. 10. Professional Socialization Professional socialization has four goals:- • To learn the technology of the professional facts, skills, and theory. • To learn to internalize the professional cultural • To find a personally and professionally acceptable Version of the role. • To integrate this professional role into all the others life roles.
  11. 11. Professional Value • Commitment to public service • Autonomy • Commitment to lifelong learning and education. • A belief in the dignity and worth of each person epitomize the caring professional nurse.
  12. 12. A Historical Review of Socialization of a Nurse 1- Values and beliefs of Florence Nightingale Early nursing education, an apprenticeship model or training as it was called reflected the values and beliefs of Florence nightingale which emphasized character over skills.
  13. 13. Transplanted from Home to Hospital • The finished products transplanted from home to hospital. • To the patients she brought the selfless devotion of mother. • To the doctor she brought the virtue of obedience. • In addition to service and obedience, training in hospital with an emphasis on duty ,obligation. Key values Loyalty to physician and trustworthiness were key values.  To be a “Gentle women” The image of nurses was gentle with all virtues and qualities that defined idealized middle and upper class womanhood.
  14. 14. Isabel Hampton Robb’s Echoed the sentiment, as reflected in the following; • “Above all ,let her remember to do what she is told to do, and no more; the sooner she learns this lesson, the easier her work will be for her, and the less likely will she be to fall under severe criticism’’. • Until the 1950, The shadows of obedience and loyalty to the physicians were dominant throughout a major portion of 1900s. • Until the 1950s, hospital was school, workplace, and home combined. • Separated from her family and community, nurse was supposed to learn craft in the classrooms and on the ward. Socialization of woman in 1900s
  15. 15. In the 1950s Loyalty to physician was presented as the nurse’s first duty. McAllister asserted that “by the virtue of her profession ,as well as her implied contracts , the nurse owes the physician not only efficient care of patients but also such evidence of loyalty as will strengthen the patient’s confidence in him”.
  16. 16. How Nursing Education Affects the Socialization of Nurses? Professional socialization is an educational procedure that takes place in a social atmosphere in which the apprentice is an essential element. Professional socialization is a procedure in which persons perform their desirable roles suitably by obtaining the focused information, skills, attitudes, ethics, norms, and interests. ( Bragg, 1976)
  17. 17. Affects of Nursing Education on Socialization of Nurses Nursing education affects the socialization of nurses by: • Improving sense of belonging • High clinical knowledge • Recovery rate of patients by applying evidence based nursing practices • Honor in society
  18. 18. Cont… • Personality characteristics • Professional practices • Training program • Socialization process • Professional competences and values through increasing motivation.
  19. 19. Socialization Through Education • Students new to the nursing profession begin to learn the role while still in the educational setting. • Cohen used the theories of cognitive development to create a model of professional nursing socialization through education. • The model describes four stages students must experience as they begin to internalize the roles of a profession.
  20. 20. Stage 1; Unilateral Dependence • In stage 1, the individual places complete reliance on external controls and searches for the one right answer. • In essence, the student looks to the instructor for the right answers and is unlikely to question the authority. • As the student gains foundational knowledge and skill, there begins the process of questioning the authority.
  21. 21. Stage 2; Negative/Independence • During this stage, the student begins to pull away from external controls and is characterized by cognitive rebellion. • The student begins to think critically and begins to question the instructor and relies more on his or her own judgments.
  22. 22. Stage 3; Dependence/Mutuality • In this stage, the student begins to apply knowledge to practice and tests information and facts. • The student is actively engaged in the learning, thinking through problems. • For this stage to emerge, the learning environment must support and value risk taking. • The role of the teacher that of coach, mentor, and senior learner to help the student link theory to practice while in the clinical areas.
  23. 23. Stage 4; Interdependence • It occurs when neither mutuality nor autonomy is dominant. • Learning from others and gaining the ability to solve problems independently are evident. • This is the stage when learner demonstrates reflection in practice and is responsible for continued learning. • Professional socialization requires a supportive educational climate that values autonomy, independent thinking, and authenticity. • Students become professionals.
  24. 24. Stages of Skill & Knowledge defined by “Benner” • Banner conceptualized in her writing about nursing skills as experience is a prerequisite for becoming an expert. • She described 5 levels of nursing experience as; 1. Novice 2. Beginner 3. Competent 4. Proficient 5. Expert
  25. 25. Novice • A person new to and inexperienced in a job or situation. • Beginner with no experience • Taught general rules to help perform tasks • Rule-governed behavior is limited and inflexible
  26. 26. Beginner • A person just starting to learn a skill or take part in an activity. • Demonstrates acceptable performance • Has gained prior experience in actual situations to recognize recurring meaningful components • Principles, based on experiences, begin to be formulated to guide actions
  27. 27. Competent • A person who is efficient and capable and having the necessary ability, knowledge, or skill to do something successfully. • Typically a nurse with 2-3 years experience on the job in the same area or in similar day-to-day situations • More aware of long-term goals • Gains perspective from planning own actions based on conscious, abstract, and analytical thinking and helps to achieve greater efficiency and organization.
  28. 28. Proficient • A person having great knowledge and experience in any profession. • Perceives and understands situations as whole parts • More holistic understanding improves decision- making • Learns from experiences what to expect in certain situations and how to modify plans.
  29. 29. Expert • A person who is very knowledgeable about or skillful in a particular area. • No longer relies on principles, rules, or guidelines to connect situations and determine actions • Much more background of experience • Has intuitive grasp of clinical situations • Performance is now fluid, flexible, and highly- proficient
  30. 30. Factors That Facilitate Professional Role Development The factors influence professional role development, such as: • Working conditions, • Staffing structures, • The availability of resources such as curricular materials and instructional tools, • Resources for conducting assessments and supplies, • Policies that affect professional requirements.
  31. 31. Summary Nursing education should be humanistic and caring, with caring experts as role models who contribute to the socialization of future generations of nurses and help them become caring experts in nursing practice. Regarding role development and socialization, it is important to remember that we learn what we live. Healthcare environments have also incorporated Benner’s model to facilitate the nurse's professional practice by assessing the nurse's stage of development. This model is not limited to the student experience or to that of the new graduate nurse. Experienced nurses also benefit from experiences designed to move the nurse toward the stage of expert.
  32. 32. References • Basvanthapa, BT. Nursing Theories (3rd ed). Jaypee Brothers: New Delhi. pp.313-326. • Benner, Patricia, and Benner, R. V. The New Nurse's Work Entry: A Troubled Sponsorship. New York, Tiresias Press, 1979. • Dinmohammadi, M., Peyrovi, H., & Mehrdad, N. (2013, January). Concept analysis of professional socialization in nursing. In nursing forum (Vol. 48, No. 1, pp. 26-34). • Masters, K. (n.d.). Role Development in Professional Nursing Practice (Sixth Edition ed.). • Retrieved from: https://www.currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Patricia_Benner_From_No vice_to_Expert.html.

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