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Semantic Web Services Meta-Model (SWS-MM)

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Semantic Web Services Meta-Model (SWS-MM)

  1. 1. SEMANTIC WEB SERVICES META-MODEL
  2. 2. Agenda  Classical Web Services  The Vision  Semantic Web Service Interaction  Some Existing Standards  New Approach  Meta-model Definition & Building  Example 2
  3. 3. “Classical” Web Services 3
  4. 4. The Vision Static ◦ 500 million users ◦ more than 3 billion pages WWW URI, HTML, HTTP 4
  5. 5. The Vision WWW URI, HTML, HTTP Serious Problems in ◦ information finding, ◦ information extracting, ◦ information representing, ◦ information interpreting and ◦ and information maintaining. Semantic Web RDF, RDF(S), OWL Static 5
  6. 6. The Vision WWW URI, HTML, HTTP Bringing the computer back as a device for computation Semantic Web RDF, RDF(S), OWL Dynamic Web Services UDDI, WSDL, SOAP Static 6
  7. 7. The Vision WWW URI, HTML, HTTP Bringing the web to its full potential (machine-understandable functionality) Semantic Web RDF, RDF(S), OWL Dynamic Web Services UDDI, WSDL, SOAP Static Semantic Web Services 7
  8. 8. Semantic Web Service Interaction 8
  9. 9. Semantic Web Service Interaction 9
  10. 10. Semantic Web Service Interaction 10
  11. 11. Semantic Web Service Interaction 11
  12. 12. Semantic Web Service Interaction 12
  13. 13. Semantic Web Service Interaction 13
  14. 14. Semantic Web Service Interaction 14
  15. 15. Semantic Web Service Interaction 15
  16. 16. Alternative Interaction 16
  17. 17. Alternative Interaction 17
  18. 18. Alternative Interaction 18
  19. 19. Alternative Interaction 19
  20. 20. Alternative Interaction 20
  21. 21. Alternative Interaction 21
  22. 22. Some Existing Standards  OWL-S  WSMO 22
  23. 23. OWL-S  Semantic markup for web services  Enables discovery of services that: o Meet particular requirements o Adhere to specified constraints  Invocation by: o Agents o Other services  Automated service composition o Provide new services 23
  24. 24. OWL-S  SWS in OWL-S consists of: o Service profile o Description of what the system does o Used to advertise the service o Service model o How it works internally o Service grounding o How to access and interact with it 24
  25. 25. OWL-S: Service Model 25
  26. 26. OWL-S: Service Profile 26
  27. 27. OWL-S: Service Grounding 27
  28. 28. Web Service Modeling Ontology (WSMO)  Formal ontology & language  Consists of 4 main elements: o Ontologies o Goals o Web services o Mediators  Comes with a modeling language called WSML  Most of the elements in WSMO can be described with non-functional properties 28
  29. 29. WSMO Top-Level Elements 29
  30. 30. WSMO: Ontology 30
  31. 31. WSMO: Web Service 31
  32. 32. WSMO: Goals 32
  33. 33. New Approach: SWS Meta-Model 33
  34. 34. SWS Meta-Model for Ontology 34
  35. 35. SWS Meta-Model for Interfaces, Operations & Messages 35
  36. 36. SWS Meta-Model for Service Provider 36
  37. 37. SWS Meta-Model for the Process Model 37
  38. 38. Example: CongoBuy 38  Bookbuying company o www.congo.com
  39. 39. 39
  40. 40. CongoBuy Interfaces 40
  41. 41. Service Provider with Processes 41
  42. 42. Thank you! 42 Hussein AlShkhir

Notas del editor

  • The grounding of a service specifies the details of how to access the service – details having mainly to do with protocol and message formats, serialization, transport and addressing.
    Only the service grounding deals with the concrete level of specification, the service profile and model are only thought of as abstract representations. The main aim of grounding is to concretely realize the inputs and outputs of an atomic process as messages.
    These further carry the inputs and outputs in a specific defined communicable form.
  • Ontologies: They provide the terminology used by other elements to describe the relevant aspects of the domains of discourse. - Goals: They state the intentions that should be solved by web services and are representations of one or more objectives which need to be fulfilled. - Web Services: A Web Service is a computational entity which is able to achieve a part of or the complete goals a user seeks to fulfill. WSMO web service descriptions describe various aspects of a service and consist of functional, non-functional and the behavioral aspects of a web service. - Mediators to resolve interoperability problems. They describe elements to overcome interoperability and incompatibility problems between different elements on data (ooMediator), process (ggMediator, wgMediator) and protocol level (wwMediator).
  • Ontologies: They provide the terminology used by other elements to describe the relevant aspects of the domains of discourse. - Goals: They state the intentions that should be solved by web services and are representations of one or more objectives which need to be fulfilled. - Web Services: A Web Service is a computational entity which is able to achieve a part of or the complete goals a user seeks to fulfill. WSMO web service descriptions describe various aspects of a service and consist of functional, non-functional and the behavioral aspects of a web service. - Mediators to resolve interoperability problems. They describe elements to overcome interoperability and incompatibility problems between different elements on data (ooMediator), process (ggMediator, wgMediator) and protocol level (wwMediator).
  • The ontology in WSMO consists mostly of concepts, attributes and instances. Each of them can be described using non-functional properties. Concepts can build a taxonomy and are linked to other concepts using attributes. There can be functions and relations using these concepts as parameter and axioms which are logical expressions together with their non-functional properties.
  • Each web service in WSMO builds on one or more ontologies and might use mediators to translate between several ontologies or web services. They are described using interfaces and capabilities.
    The interface for a complex web service is characterized using the web service orchestration or choreography which is built using an abstract state machine (on states and transitions).
    The capability describes the functional parameters of the (one-step or multi-step) web service. It specifies the preconditions (the information state of the web service before execution), assumptions (the state of the world before execution), postconditions (the information state of the web service after its execution) and effects (the state of the world after execution).
  • WSMO goals enable the possibility to model the intentions that should be solved by one or more web services. They describe an interface that should be implemented and capabilities that need to be fulfilled. Therefore, ontologies and mediators might be needed to achieve the goal.

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