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Dr.Martin o’brien & Carol Allen - Evidence Based Practice methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students - IEFE Forum 2014

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Dr.Martin o’brien & Carol Allen - Evidence Based Practice methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students - IEFE Forum 2014

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Presenters:
1- Martin O’Brien
Assistant Director Maryland School for the Deaf / USA
Coordinator of International Education Programs
2- Carol Allen
Advisory Teacher for ICT and SEN, North Tyneside Local Authority (UK)

Topic:
Evidence Based Practice
methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students

IEFE Forum 2014

Presenters:
1- Martin O’Brien
Assistant Director Maryland School for the Deaf / USA
Coordinator of International Education Programs
2- Carol Allen
Advisory Teacher for ICT and SEN, North Tyneside Local Authority (UK)

Topic:
Evidence Based Practice
methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students

IEFE Forum 2014

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Dr.Martin o’brien & Carol Allen - Evidence Based Practice methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students - IEFE Forum 2014

  1. 1. February, 2014 Evidence Based Practice methods and ideas in planning and teaching deaf students Presenter: Martin O’Brien Assistant Director Maryland School for the Deaf / USA Coordinator of International Education Programs martin.obrien@msd.edu www.msd.edu
  2. 2. Group Discussion Reading Audio-Visual Lecture Teaching Others Practice Demonstration
  3. 3. Early Identification Early Intervention EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  4. 4. 2 to 3 children out of 1000 are born deaf in the US each year EARLY INTERVENTION Today 95% of babies are tested before leaving the hospital 90% of those children are born to hearing families In the year 2000 the age for identification was 2 ½ years old EARLY IDENTIFICATION
  5. 5. Early Intervention Program What Does it Include? • Special Note: when you start addressing the needs of the child and the family as immediate as possible helps to prevent your child from falling behind • Home visits by a professional • Provide family support • Helps the family decide which services are the best • Helps families learn how to communicate to the child, with gestures, body language and signs • Encourages play to support the development of communication and language • Teach the family how to include the child in family activities • Helps the child learn how to use hearing aids • Helps the child learn how to be understood by others • Transition: There must be a plan for moving the child out of early intervention services and into an educational program by the time your child reaches 3.
  6. 6. Strong Curriculum EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF 2
  7. 7. Common Core Standards  The Common Core Standards is a series of consistent and clear set of standards to indicate what students should know and what students are expected to learn at each grade level throughout their educational life in Reading, Writing, and in Math.  The Common Core Standards is not a curriculum. States develop their own curriculum to be aligned with the Common Core Standards.  These standards were designed by teachers, parents, and community leaders and were designed to be relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that students need for success in college and careers
  8. 8. Common Core Standards (con’t)  The Common Core standards were developed in 2009 and released in 2010.  Within a matter of months, these standards had been endorsed by 45 states.  As a result publishing companies are aligning their materials with the Common Core Standards  technology companies are creating software and curriculum which are aligned with the Common Core  on line tests are being created to assess student achievement  it will take 12 years before we know if the Common Core Standards are effective What does this have to do with educating the deaf?
  9. 9. High Expectations EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  10. 10. What is High Expectations?  any effort to set the same high educational standards for all students in a class, school, or in an educational setting  a failure to hold all students to high expectations effectively denies them access to a high-quality education  educational achievement of students tends to rise or fall in direct relation to the expectations placed upon them  students who are expected to learn more or perform better generally do so, while those held to lower expectations usually achieve less
  11. 11. Systematic Planning EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  12. 12. Haphazard vs. Systematic • Deaf children do not learn well with a haphazard instructional plan or approach. • Haphazard instruction is when the educational plan is developed disconnected chunks or pieces of information, knowledge, and experiences. • Haphazard instruction leads to educational confusion where little progress is made.
  13. 13. Haphazard vs. Systematic (cont’d) • A systematic approach to education is when the educational plan is not viewed as a collection of independent parts but instead is viewed and developed as a web of relationships. • a web of interconnecting knowledge and experiences tied together to where education, where learning, and where a sense of the world begins to emerge. How do we provide a systematic educational system?
  14. 14. Building Systematic Educational www.watersfoundation.org
  15. 15. Scaffolding EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  16. 16. Scaffolding • Scaffolding is the ability as a teacher to provide students with academic support which guides them through a learning task. • This academic support requires the teacher to provide students with information in small pieces. • This information is built on previous knowledge and skills until competency is acquired.
  17. 17. USE OF A COMPUTER GOAL: TO DEVELOP A POWER POINT PRESENTATION COPY PICTURES THE INTERNET INSERT PICTURES INSERT SHAPES CHANGE THE FONT COLOR HIGHLIGHT COPY AND PASTE TYPE DELETE CHANGE FONT
  18. 18. Scaffolding What does this mean? • Model or demonstrate new skill • Present manageable steps • Teach one task at a time • Make expectations clear • Provide background knowledge (background knowledge is the key to scaffolding).
  19. 19. TASK VISUAL AIDS PRE-TEACH VOCABULARY STRUCTURED DISCUSSION SHARE EXPERIENCES MODELING http://www.edutopia.org/blog/scaffolding-lessons-six-strategies-rebecca-alber
  20. 20. WE DO IT TOGETHER YOU DO IT IN A SMALL GROUP YOU DO IT ALONE I DO IT SCAFFOLDING A LESSON
  21. 21. Thematic Collaborative Practice EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  22. 22. Thematic Collaborative Practice Thematic Collaborative Practice may explore various broad subjects such as communities, rain forests, rivers, friendship, the use of energy, and so on - Thematic Collaborative Practice is the organization of a lesson around a larger based theme. Thematic Collaborative Practice integrates basic subject areas such as reading, math, writing, and science. Deaf students learn better when education is less fragmented. www.funderstanding.com/educators/thematic-instruction/#sthash
  23. 23. Basic Elements of Thematic and Collaborative Practice  Thematic Collaborative Practice is based on the idea that deaf children acquire knowledge best when learning within a coherent whole rather than in fragmented parts  Thematic Collaborative Practice is also based on the idea that deaf children acquire knowledge best when what they are learning is connected to the real world.  Thematic instruction seeks to put the teaching of cognitive skills such as reading, mathematics, science, and writing in the context of a real-world subject  Teachers collaborate as a team to design instruction methods, and assessment around a preselected theme. http://www.funderstanding.com/educators/thematicinstruction/#sthash.UokFEtJQ.dpuf
  24. 24. Science Math Writing Reading Theme
  25. 25. Elements of Thematic Collaborative Practice Choose Theme Design Instruction Presentation Research and Writing RIVERS Reading Math Calculate river flow Compare length and width of rivers Science Weather and floods Animal habitats Social Studies Rivers around the world River communities
  26. 26. Elements of Thematic Collaborative Practice  Math  Science   Tectonic Plates  Angles   Cones Environmental Changes  Volume  Effects of Pressure   Triangles Measurement  Layers of the Earth  Creation of New Land Language Arts VOLCANOS  Social Studies  Non-fiction reading  Latitude and Longitude  Research  Landforms  Note taking  Mapping  Sequencing events  Ancient Rome  Writing  Current Events
  27. 27. Hands-on Minds-on EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  28. 28. Hands-On / Mind-On • Activity: Students are given a problem-solving activity based on a real-life or authentic situation real-life situation. • Hands-On: Students perform a task as they built, make, design something as they gain meaning and understanding of the concept being taught. • Minds-On: Activities focus on a main concept where students are encouraged to question, to collaborate with others, to dialogue, and to seek answers. Inquiry Based Learning Problem Based Learning
  29. 29. Inquiry Based / Problem Based Learning EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF
  30. 30. Inquiry Based / Project Based • The teacher’s role is to set up challenges that require students to observe, test, record evidence, and reflect on meaning. These are the practices that lead to solving problems and understanding the situation presented. • When students are fully engaged in a task, they are actively doing and actively thinking. While hands are engaged, minds should be questioning and making connections.
  31. 31. Inquiry Based Learning Students explore a question in-depth and ask further questions to gather knowledge. Problem Based Learning Students investigate and solve a realworld problem. Students must identify what they already know and what they need to learn, and then they find and apply knowledge.
  32. 32. Inquiry-Based Problem-Based Learning Burning Question Real World Problem Collaborative a Working Groups Teacher Facilitated Guidance Share Finished Project with an Audience
  33. 33. Plan a Party Raise Money Clean a River Help Homeless People
  34. 34. Response to Intervention EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF R.T.I.
  35. 35. READING SPECIALIST HOMEWORK LAB TUTORING SUPPORT SERVICES SCHOOL COUNSELOR ACADEMIC COACH BEHAVIOR SPECIALIST
  36. 36. Early Identification Response to Intervention Problem Based Learning Hands-on Minds-on Systematic Planning Evidence Based Practice in Teaching the Deaf Scaffolding Thematic and Collaborative
  37. 37. Think-Aloud EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF 7
  38. 38. Think-aloud can be used when reading, writing, solving math problems, or when responding to questions. Effective teachers think out loud on a regular basis to model the thinking process for students. The think-aloud strategy asks students to say out loud what they are thinking
  39. 39. We like the same things nice What Makes a Good Friend We like to talk funny Elyas Good listener We like to travel
  40. 40. What Makes a Good Friend
  41. 41. Teachers reflect on the thinking process Estimate the number of people in a crowd Teachers model how to think Predict the outcome of an experiment THINK-ALOUD Access prior knowledge before reading The thinking process becomes internalized Become independent thinkers and learners Monitor comprehension when reading
  42. 42. Graphic Organizers Concept Maps EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR DEAF 8
  43. 43. GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS CONCEPT MAPS pictorial way of constructing knowledge and organizing information helps the student convert and compress seemingly disjointed information into a structured, simple-to-read, graphic display the resulting visual display conveys complex information in a simple-tounderstand manner
  44. 44. Characteristics American Hero Contribution to Society Achievements Impact on History Biographical Information Famous Quote George Washington
  45. 45. INTERESTING THINK ABOUT • Socrates was a proponent of learning by doing. Socrates modeled how to learn through questioning, inquiry, and critical thinking -- all strategies that remain very relevant in education today. • To succeed in today’s complex, dynamic, and globally connected world, students need to have a depth of understanding and learning that is far more than memorization and recollection of facts and figures. 469 BC – 399 BC
  46. 46. INTERESTING THINK ABOUT • Lev Vygotsky believed that social interaction plays a fundamental role in the process of cognitive development. Every function in the child’s development appears first on the social level, and later, on the individual level; first, between people and then inside the child. • Application: teacher and students collaborate together in the learning and practicing process. The teacher's role in the process is reduced over time as the child becomes a more independent learner. 1896 - 1934 • Application: instructional concepts such as scaffolding in which a teacher or more advanced peer helps to structure or arrange a task so that a novice can work on it successfully.
  47. 47. • http://wveis.k12.wv.us/teach21/public/project/Mai nMenu.cfm?tsele1=4

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