Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

Module 4: Monitoring and documentation

294 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Presented by ILRI, ICARDA and Transition International, at the Gender Capacity Development Training, ILRI Addis, 23-27 October 2017

Publicado en: Ciencias
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Module 4: Monitoring and documentation

  1. 1. Module 4: Monitoring and documentation ILRI, ICARDA and Transition International Gender Capacity Development Training, ILRI Addis, 23-27 October 2017
  2. 2. 1. Objective module 4: Monitoring and documentation To increase partners’ knowledge of gender responsive monitoring and documenting in such a way that they are able to: – design and use gender responsive monitoring systems and, – produce quality knowledge documents and publications on gender
  3. 3. Focus  focus on gender responsive monitoring and documenting and putting gender central to monitoring systems – not at increasing general monitoring and documentation capacities.  Development organizations: monitoring and documenting the gendered outcomes of their development interventions;  Research organizations: monitoring and documenting the gendered outcomes of research interventions, production of knowledge documents and provision of gender inputs to other organizations’ publications
  4. 4. Learning questions • What is a gender responsive monitoring system and what does it consist of? • How to design and use gender responsive monitoring systems? • How to use sex-disaggregated data in monitoring and gender analysis? • What are gender responsive indicators? • How to monitor and document gender responsive approaches? • How to produce knowledge documents and publications on gender?
  5. 5. Levels Core Gender Capacities Environmental Organizational Individual Gender analysis and strategic planning A.I A.II A.III Gender responsive programming, budgeting and implementation B.I B.II B.III Knowledge management and gender responsive M&E C.I C.II C.III Partnerships and advocacy D.I D.II D.III Leadership and transformation E.I E.II E.III Gender at the workplace F.I F.II F.III Module 4 Focus module 4
  6. 6. Capacity Assessment outcomes for development partners (assessment 2015) Knowledge management and gender responsive M&E Averages Doyogena Horro Yabello Org. Ind. Org. Ind. Org. Ind. Org. Ind. The capacity to collect, interpret and report on sex- disaggregated data 2.4 2.0 3.0 2.3 Existence and quality of a gender responsive M&E system and ability to use it 1.8 2.3 2.0 1.0 Capacity to train other actors on gender responsive M&E 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Access to and production of knowledge documents and publications on gender 1.3 1.0 1.0 2.0 Capacity to provide gender inputs, perspectives, insights to other organizations’ reports and publications 1.7 1.0 3.0 1.0 Staff’s ability to collect, interpret and report on sex- disaggregated data 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.9 Staff’s ability to develop/work with gender sensitive systems and tools for monitoring, evaluation and learning and measuring changes from gender interventions 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.0 Staff’s access to and ability to produce quality documents and publications on gender 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.8 Access to gender-sensitive M&E training of female and male staff 2.1 2.2 2.1 1.9 Average 1.6 2.2 1.5 2.2 2.0 2.2 1.5 2.1 Note: maximum score = 5
  7. 7. Capacity Assessment outcomes for research partners (assessment 2015) Knowledge management and gender responsive M&E Averages Areka Bako Yabello Org. Ind. Org. Ind. Org. Ind. Org. Ind . The capacity to collect, interpret and report on sex- disaggregated data in all research 2.1 1.3 3.0 2.0 Existence and quality of a gender responsive M&E system and ability to use it 1.7 2.0 2.0 1.0 The capacity to provide inputs for national policies and legislation on gender responsive knowledge management within VCs 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 The capacity to collect, develop and make accessible quality knowledge documents and publications on gender 1.3 1.0 2.0 1.0 Capacity to provide gender inputs, perspectives, insights to other organizations’ reports and publications 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Scientists’ ability and commitment to collect, interpret and report on sex- disaggregated data 2.2 1.4 2.5 2.6 Scientists’ ability to develop/work with gender sensitive systems and tools for monitoring, evaluation and learning and measuring changes from gender interventions 2.0 1.8 2.4 1.9 Scientists’ access to and ability to produce quality documents and publications on gender 1.7 1.4 1.8 1.9 Average 1.7 2.0 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.2 1.2 2.1 Note: maximum score = 5
  8. 8. Agenda for today 1. Feedback from earlier modules; 2. Definition and scope of gender responsive monitoring; 3. Developing gender responsive indicators; 4. Practicum gender responsive monitoring; 5. The collection and use of sex-disaggregated data in monitoring and gender analysis; 6. Develop learning questions and actions; 7. Workshop evaluation.
  9. 9. 2. Feedback from earlier modules Recap from module 2 and 3
  10. 10. Feedback from earlier modules…
  11. 11. 3. Gender responsive monitoring
  12. 12. • helps to improve project performance: has the project achieved improvements in the lives and well-being of women and men? • Proven impacts can be used to improve decision-making and policies • Know and address unintended negative consequences and gender based constraints • Gender responsive M&E identifies opportunities to empower women Why gender responsive monitoring?
  13. 13. • gender issues have to be measured on purpose and from the start, otherwise they will not be given any attention during the implementation of the project / program • Much M&E focuses on numbers and outputs and not on quality of participation and benefits • Data aggregated by household (and not by sex) obscures gender differences within households Why gender responsive monitoring?
  14. 14. Concepts: monitoring vs evaluation Monitoring Evaluation Continuous Periodical (mid/end term) Analysis and checking of progress Assessment of impact, effectiveness, sustainability Often internal Often external To improve implementation Assess achievement of results
  15. 15. Concepts: gender responsive monitoring • Assesses the project’s effects and impacts (intended or unintended) on gender relations and women’s empowerment. • Tracks changes in: – the conditions and positions of women and men participating in the value chain, – women's and men's shares in employment and income across value chain nodes – gender relations such as in the gender division of labor and workload, differences in access and control over resources and information, decision making, and others, – women’s and men’s attitudes and perceptions. • Gender responsive M&E should collect gender data and analyze the reasons for gender differences and develop interventions
  16. 16. 4. Developing gender responsive indicators
  17. 17. Gender responsive indicators: definition an indicator that captures gender-related changes in society, in a value chain, etc. over time • Does the program/project have different benefits and results for men and women? How and why? • Does the program/project affect changes in gender relations? How and why? • Requires sex-disaggregated data collection • Measures changes in positions and not (just) numbers, Compare: – “the number of women who joined the producer association” and – “percentage change in proportion of women’s membership” • involve both women and men in developing, collecting and analyzing indicators
  18. 18. Gender responsive indicators: examples From LAF program’s Gender Strategy – impact level • Change in women’s share of income from livestock and fish enterprises • Participation of women and other vulnerable groups in the livestock and fish markets • Change in assets ownership by men and women • Change in control of livelihood assets by men and women • Change in consumption of Animal Source Foods (ASF) by men, women, and children • Change in women’s control of livestock and fish resources (e.g. decision making power)
  19. 19. Gender responsive indicators: examples From FAO-ILRI workshop on integrating gender in livestock projects • Access to and control over assets • Access to and use of technologies • Production and productivity • Labor use in livestock production • Contribution of livestock to cash/no cash income • Food security
  20. 20. Group exercise • Develop 3-4 gender responsive indicators – for your own gender strategy – Drawing from the Poultry example • Present indicators using a mindmap or similar diagram
  21. 21. Relevant indicators (objectively verifiable indicators) Quality What What do I want to achieve and measure Quantity How much How How much do I want to achieve? And how to measure this? (numbers, %, grades, levels, etc) Target group Who Who do I want to benefit Taking into account variables like sex, age, and ethnicity Time/period When When do I want to have achieved this and for how long Place Where Where do I want to see the result (place, space)
  22. 22. SMART indicators Specific They specify who, what, where, when and how much/often Measurable They give an indication of quantity and quality Achievable They are achievable at an acceptable cost (cost effectiveness relationship) Relevant They are relevant with respect to the objective and ToC of the intervention Time They are achievable in the time of the intervention
  23. 23. 5. Sex-disaggregated data
  24. 24. Sex-disaggregated data: definition Data related to individuals that are collected, analyzed and presented separately for men and women. disaggregate further by: – age – ethnicity – marital status – sexual identity – ability – etc. Not the same as comparing male and female-headed households!
  25. 25. Sex-disaggregated data: collection Sex-disaggregated data can be collected from men and women randomly selected from different households: Household x: 1 man Household y: 1 woman Or from one man and one woman within one household Household x: 1 man and 1 woman (primary members) Not necessarily twice as many people!
  26. 26. Sex-disaggregated data: difficulties • men may not be willing to allow their spouses to be interviewed • Women may not be available at certain times of day, and men may be less likely to be present at other times • inconsistencies in data between men and women (especially when the same questions are asked to men and women) • “joint management” could be a disguised male dominance • Much of women’s work is under-valued or ‘invisible’ to men and outsiders, and thus not reported
  27. 27. Sex-disaggregated data: possible solutions • Use both male and female enumerators; • men and women to be interviewed separately, simultaneously and privately; • multiple visits to households for gaining confidence, follow-up discussions and comparison of data; • Choose a time and place which is convenient for women and men (may be different) • Starting interviews with questions on less sensitive domains • Compare men and women’s responses to similar questions, and gather feedback on differences (FGDs) • Recognize diversities (class, ethnic, religious and other) as well as individual preferences and abilities
  28. 28. 6. Monitoring and Evaluation tools • Women empowerment index • Women empowerment framework • Gender value chain analysis
  29. 29. Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index (practicum)
  30. 30. Group exercise- developing and M&E framework • Objectives • Activities • Indicators • Verification
  31. 31. Discussion • Understanding of the tool • Pros and cons of the tool • Application of the tool for your own monitoring • Data collection aspects
  32. 32. Developing learning questions and action plans • Form group (by organization) and develop action plans
  33. 33. Workshop Evaluation
  34. 34. CGIAR Research Program on Livestock livestock.cgiar.org The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock aims to increase the productivity and profitability of livestock agri-food systems in sustainable ways, making meat, milk and eggs more available and affordable across the developing world. This presentation is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. The program thanks all donors and organizations which globally support its work through their contributions to the CGIAR system

×