Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
Improving productivity in Kenyan
Smallholder Dairy systems through selective,
intensive education and supported adoption
J...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Improving productivity in Kenyan smallholder dairy systems through selective, intensive education and supported adoption

239 visualizaciones

Publicado el

Poster prepared by John Goopy and Jesse Gakige for the Tropentag 2016 Conference on Solidarity in a Competing World—Fair Use of Resources, Vienna, Austria, 19–21 September 2016

Publicado en: Ciencias
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Improving productivity in Kenyan smallholder dairy systems through selective, intensive education and supported adoption

  1. 1. Improving productivity in Kenyan Smallholder Dairy systems through selective, intensive education and supported adoption JP Goopy1, JK Gakige1 1 The Mazingira Centre, International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi Introduction • Improving productivity of smallholder dairy has the potential to improve milk supply and quality and rural incomes. • Average milk yield is 1.8-3. 0 l/d in W. Kenya. • Low milk yield is often attributed to poor genetics, BUT we discovered that frequently production is constrained by a lack of knowledge, regarding husbandry and feeding. • Currently existing training, but is short-term, narrow and untargeted in terms of recipients. Methods • Target early adopters. • Identifying innovators in a number of communities in Western Kenya. • Provide an 1mth intensive course covering: • husbandry, • animal nutrition, • forage/crop agronomy • dairy technology • business analysis skills. • Farmers will be supported to implement knowledge and technology in his/her community. • Beneficiaries of training will serve as a focal point and source of knowledge in their communities. Pictures Conclusion • Targeted selection of course participants results in high rates of adoption and dissemination. • In-depth training improves comprehension and allows individuals to select interventions that best apply to their situation. • Uptake and persistence of adoption will be improved by providing ongoing logistical support. Partners logoJohn Goopy .j.goopy@cgiar.org The Mazingira Centre ● ILRI, Nairobi Kenya ● ilri.org This project was funded by GIZ This document is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. Date Year. June 2012 (First) Results • 83 farmers trained (2 schools); follow-up concluded on 1st School (33 farmers). (Table 1) Table1: Practice adoption and training given by course attendees Demonstrating the use of scythes for mowing hay to farmers Small –scale silage making demonstration Technology/ Practice Trainee Adoption Farmers trained by trainees Forage Preservation (Hay making/Silage production) 17 152 Forage/ Fodder Cultivation 21 124 Improved feeding/ Milk yield 10 197 Improved Husbandry 9 75 Improved milk Handling 2 26 Manure handling/ Compost Production 3 0 Farmers using a manual hay baler Tropentag, Wien, Austria. Sept. 18- 21, 2016

×