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Leading through change workshop flow summary

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Leading through change workshop flow summary

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key slides from interactive workshop on leading through change. Participants create their own video pitch to immediately transfer theory to practice within the workshop.

key slides from interactive workshop on leading through change. Participants create their own video pitch to immediately transfer theory to practice within the workshop.

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Leading through change workshop flow summary

  1. 1. Leading people through Change Irina Burgess “Life comes at us in waves. We can't always predict or control those waves, but we can learn to surf” Dan Millman
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. A definition of Performance 3
  4. 4. The Change Game 5
  5. 5. Reactions and Responses 6
  6. 6. Take outs 1. We always need to put change in context 2. Start with the easiest changes to build trust and momentum 3. Gain group as well as individual responsibility for change 4. There is a limit to how much change people can handle 5. Planning and preparation is key 7
  7. 7. Change and uncertainty can be… 8
  8. 8. Ultimately… 9
  9. 9. What’s your Blueprint?
  10. 10. Change can create a stress response Unhealthy Stress Response Healthy Stress Response • Based upon imagination / • Based on a clearly stories taken to be real perceived and real threat • Tendency to over or • The response is under react measured • Response hinders coping • Response assists coping • Emotions and intelligence • Emotions and intelligence at variance working together 11
  11. 11. Extended negative stress… • Change fatigue from input overload sets in • Black and white thinking escalates • Overall health and well being deteriorates • Low level anxiety is the norm • Sick leave escalates • People act out 12
  12. 12. 5 Quick Tips for handling your Emotions when stressed 1. Take 6 deep breaths 2. Talk to someone 3. Label your emotions 4. Change your physical state 5. Play music to shift your mood 13
  13. 13. Why some change efforts fail and others succeed 14
  14. 14. Key Components of Change Action Vision Skills Reinforcers Resources Plan Effective Change Action Skills Reinforcers Resources Plan Confusion Action Anxiety Vision Reinforcers Resources Plan Vision Skills Resources Action Plan Slow change Vision Skills Reinforcers Action Plan Frustration Vision Skills Reinforcers Resources False Starts
  15. 15. Biggest Obstacles to Successful Change 1. Ineffective change sponsorship from senior leaders 2. Resistance to the change from employees 3. Poor support and alignment with middle management 4. Lack of change management resources and planning Ref: Best Practices in Change Management Benchmarking Report, Prosci Research. 2013 16
  16. 16. The ADKAR Model Developed by Jeff Hiatt, owned by Prosci Research 17
  17. 17. 18
  18. 18. 1: Create Awareness of the need for change 1. Clarify Key Messages as to why this change is necessary 2. Select multiple communications across multiple Channels 3. Share information early and often 19
  19. 19. 2. Build Desire to support and participate in the change 1. Identify your audience 2. Identify organisational and individual contexts for change 3. Stretch ambivalence 4. Address internal motivators where possible 20
  20. 20. We change for a reason 21
  21. 21. 3. Make Knowledge Available • Knowledge represents the information, training and education necessary to know how to change • Creating Knowledge – training and education programs – open and ready access to information – examples and role models 22
  22. 22. 4. Ability – turning knowledge into action When we ask employees to act or work differently, we are really asking them to concurrently: 1. Develop new or different physical capabilities (motor skills). 2. Approach work differently and apply new work methods (analytical or cognitive ability). 3. Interact differently with co-workers, customers and suppliers (changes in behaviour) 23
  23. 23. 5. Reinforcement of the change • Establish a system of controls • Ask for and provide regular positive feedback • Ensure a policy of rewards and recognition combined with punishments • Create a continuous system of monitoring and measuring performance to take corrective actions 24
  24. 24. The Pitch 25
  25. 25. Message management - Framing Creates Meaning 26
  26. 26. Lessons from Advertising 27
  27. 27. Take Aways 28
  28. 28. “Life comes at us in waves. We can't always predict or control those waves, but we can learn to surf” Dan Millman 29

Notas del editor

  • RESPONSES VARY and there are various lenses to understand them through. Lets look at a few…. Change Response as a journey, change response as a stress response, and I’m sure you can add a few of your own superlatives…Ultimately it is about our perception and self talk. COGNITIONS – thoughts and beliefsLets take some time now to just highlight responses to change…
  • We all have strategies for managing our emotions, some more effective than others. After a stressful day at work we might hit the gym or head out for drinks with our buddies. A regular exercise routine to keep our energy levels high or switching off in the evenings with a good book can be how we manage our moods proactively.Broadening our emotion management toolkitWe often resort to less effective and sustainable tactics to manage emotional experiences. These may include blocking out negative emotions with excessive drinking, gaming or TV. Managing uncomfortable feelings and thoughts by persistently pushing them away is also counter-productive and often makes them persist and erupt when we least expect it. Emotion suppression over time is also associated with a raft of health problems. In contrast, dealing with our anger by yelling at our colleagues, even in a closed office, is more likely to inflate negative emotions rather than resolve them.When our familiar coping strategies fail or aren’t accessible, how do we manage our emotions effectively in the moment? How do we give ourselves more opportunities to respond intelligently rather than reactively in challenging, emotionally charged situations?Being able to draw on a wide toolkit to select the right emotion management strategy for the situation is critical in the immediate and long term. This is one of the hallmarks of Emotional Intelligence. Emotion management strategiesBreathe. Take 6 deep diaphragmatic breaths. Our body cannot sustain anger through deep breathing. Let the lower lungs have that oxygen to pass around your body and brain. This will calm you and flood you with oxygen. You may feel tingly. Do it for at least 60 seconds.Listen to music to shift your mood to a more resourceful state – set up your playlists on your phone. Tubba thumping / Jack Johnson / M PeopleChange your physical state – smile, shake out tension, meditate, bouncing and raising your arms / star jumps… /  Smile to make yourself feel good. Find a mirror, make it fun. If it doesn’t feel right to start with, you will soon be laughing at yourself and feel better naturally. The muscles we use to smile will tell our brain we are happy. Do it for at least 30 seconds. Get up and move. Jump around. It is important to move our lymph nodes to get toxins out of our body. Our lymphatic system doesn’t have muscles to get it moving; it works when we move other parts of our body and allow gravity to massage it. Bouncing is the best way. Raising our arms generates the release of hormones under our armpits – often referred to as ‘happy hormones’. Again, this will tell our brain we are happy and make us feel better. Get up from your desk regularly. Check in with your body. Do a body scan. Take note of where you are holding tension and your overall physiology. Relate these tensions and changes to the emotion you are feeling to begin to understand where and how different emotions affect you. Physically remove the tension. If you feel tense in the arms, shake your arms; if you feel tight in your chest, stretch and expand or breathe deeply.  4. Talk to someone. Express your feelings to begin to resolve the situation. Vent to a friend or colleague rather than suppress emotions. Give a time limit to focusing on the problem. Why? Shift into solution mode… Label your emotion. The part of the brain that can label or name an emotion is the same part that ‘feels’ the emotion. Labelling is proven to reduce the intensity. Just by saying “I feel angry” you actually feel less angry.Disengage and re-engage emotions. Park a challenging emotion to deal with later, rather than just avoiding it. Acknowledge and accept the feeling then use your emotional intelligence to help generate a more useful emotion.   Label emotions for others. We can often disarm an emotionally charged situation by acknowledging what people are feeling. “I sense you are angry, can you tell me how you feel?” This encourages others to consider and label their emotions with greater accuracy: “Yes, I feel angry” or “No, I am not angry, I am annoyed”.
  • 1. Ineffective change sponsorship from senior leaders - Harvey Norman IT. We only reward sales not behaviours, withdrew the store vouchers for the values awards. nactive or invisible sponsorsSponsors not at the right level (not high enough in the organization)Poor alignment among key stakeholders resulting in a weak sponsor coalitionWavering sponsor commitment (especially on longer projects)Conflicts of interest between key business leaders (managers’ objectives were not aligned with the change)2. Resistance to the change from employees – gossiping, passive aggressive behaviour, white anting, not cooperating. Proactive and reactive actions needed. IT indiv to networked printers… Lack of understanding of why the change is happening and “What’s in it for me?” or “WIIFM”Long-tenured employees unwilling to support the changeLoss of control and ownership of work processesFear of the future state, including concerns over job security The Procurement and IT functions identified the use of printers as a potential opportunity. In this company, many employees had their own individual printers connected to their computers in their offices. Procurement and IT came up with the idea of setting up networked printers that were to be located in convenient locations. Employees could then connect their computers wirelessly to these networked printers. Savings were estimated at over $2 million annually. The proposal was approved by senior management; networked printers were ordered, and communication to employees explaining the benefits of this new process was issued.Within a few weeks, the IT staffs started to remove the individual printers from employees’ offices. The hue and cry was overwhelming. Even though the networked printers were designed to be located no more than a few yards from each employee who needed to print something, the vast majority of employees said that this was a great inconvenience. Some also objected that confidential documents would be compromised since anyone could go over to the printer and view documents as they were being printed. There was so much resistance that senior management decided to phase in the program over two years rather than implement it quickly, thus losing significant opportunity costs.This example illustrates why many efforts to implement change do not work and how resistance works. We are creatures of habit and when we get into a routine, we don’t necessarily want to change for the sake of change – especially when something is taken away from us that we are used to. So how did they shift perspective? Demonstration sessions were initiated, employees saw physically the benefits of the networked printers (all of which were faster than the printers they currently had), and employee suggestions for ensuring confidentiality of documents were put in place. Actual cost savings were communicated monthly so employees could see the progress of the change.3. Poor support and alignment with middle management – RTA… not signing off. Challenging and stalling implementation.Middle managers were reluctant to support the change when they perceived that the change was not aligned with their operational objectives or when they expected negative impacts to their day-to-day operations. This lack of support was evident by middle managers who were unwilling to communicate consistent and accurate information about the change and who exhibited poor sponsorship of the change with their employees. (inconsistent and incomplete or inaccurate communication). UNITING CARE – regional to central support services for IT and Payroll. SHARED SERVICES MODEL. Complaining, criticising. Answering direct calls and not working across teams. E.g. support desk to network team. Logging and resolution of calls…4. Lack of change management resources and planning Lack of change management resources and planning included insufficient resources available to conduct the necessary planning and implementation, the lack of a formal change management approach and the lack of change management knowledge within the team. Some participants stated that they did not form the change management team early enough. Others reported that they did not have the budget or sufficient time to apply change management properly.
  • Falklands – 8:1 Against, next day “target rich environment” . The Gruen Transfer…. Selling the unsellable. Creating tangible value from the intangible…
  • The elusive goal is translating intentions into actions. Resolutions into results.
  • Enjoy your surfing adventures and all best with implementing ADKAR to achieve better change results.

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