Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

Equipping the researcher - patterns in the UK and US

2.180 visualizaciones

Publicado el

UK and US academic practices – Christine Wolff, Ithaka S+R and David Prosser, RLUK
Digital scholarship centres – Harriet Hemmassi, Brown University and Joan Lippincott, CNI
Software carpentry and software skills and practice – Neil Chue Hong, Software Sustainability Institute

Jisc and CNI conference, 6 July 2016

Publicado en: Educación
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Equipping the researcher - patterns in the UK and US

  1. 1. Equipping the researcher – patterns in the UK and US Chair: Louisa Dale, Jisc 14/07/2016 1
  2. 2. Introduction Chair: Louisa Dale, Jisc 14/07/2016
  3. 3. UK and US academic practices ChristineWolff, Ithaka s+R – David Prosser, RLUK 14/07/2016
  4. 4. EQUIPPING THE RESEARCHER: PATTERNS IN THE UK AND US Christine Wolff | @christinemwolff David Prosser | @RLUK_David 6 July 2016
  5. 5. US & UK FACULTY SURVEYS Examining the attitudes and behaviors of scholars & academic staff on a triennial basis Topics covered in 2015 cycle: • Discovery • Access • Research topics and practices • Research dissemination, including data management • Instruction • The role of the library 5
  6. 6. INVITATIONS AND RESPONSE US Faculty Survey UK Survey of Academics Population Faculty members in all colleges and universities that grant bachelor’s degree and higher Academic staff at UK higher education institutions Administration 12 October – 4 December 2015 13 October – 18 December 2015 Invitations 145,550 64,259 Responses 9,203 6,679 Response rate 6.3% 10.4% 6
  7. 7. KEY FINDINGS 7
  8. 8. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS 8
  9. 9. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS Please use the 10 to 1 scales below to indicate how well each statement below describes your point of view: My undergraduate students have poor skills related to locating and evaluating scholarly information. 9
  10. 10. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS Percent of respondents who strongly agreed that their undergraduate students have poor skills related to locating and evaluating scholarly information. 10 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% UK US 2012 2015
  11. 11. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS How important is it to you that your college or university library provides each of the functions below or serves in the capacity listed below?  Gateway: The library serves as a starting point or “gateway” for locating information for my research  Buyer: The library pays for resources I need, from academic journals to books to electronic databases  Archive: The library serves as a repository of resources; in other words, it archives, preserves, and keeps track of resources  Teaching support: The library supports and facilitates my teaching activities  Research support: The library provides active support that helps to increase the productivity of my research and scholarship  Undergraduate support: The library helps undergraduates develop research, critical analysis, and information literacy skills 11
  12. 12. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS Percent of US respondents who identified each function as highly important. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 20152012200920062003 Gateway Buyer Archive Teaching support Research support Undergraduate support 12
  13. 13. INCREASED INTEREST IN SUPPORTING STUDENTS Percent of UK respondents who identified each function as highly important. 13 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Buyer Undergraduate support Teaching support Archive Gateway Research support 2012 2015
  14. 14. FORMAT TRANSITION FOR MONOGRAPHS? 14
  15. 15. FORMAT TRANSITION FOR MONOGRAPHS? Please think about doing each of these things with a scholarly monograph in print format or in digital format, and use the scales below to indicate how much easier or harder is it to perform each activity in print or digital format.  Reading cover to cover in depth  Reading a section in depth  Comparing treatment of ideas between monographs  Skimming in whole or in part  Exploring references  Searching for a particular topic 15
  16. 16. FORMAT TRANSITION FOR MONOGRAPHS? Change in percentage points of US respondents indicating how much easier or harder is it to perform each activity in print or digital format from 2012 to 2015. Easier in print format than digital About the same in print and digital format Easier in digital format than print Reading cover to cover in depth -2.18 1.89 0.29 Reading a section in depth 5.84 -2.53 -2.91 Comparing treatment of ideas between monographs 8.54 -7.65 -0.89 Skimming in whole or in part 8.82 -1.88 -6.83 Exploring references 10.29 -1.60 -8.70 Searching for a particular topic 1.20 -0.21 -0.99 16
  17. 17. FORMAT TRANSITION FOR MONOGRAPHS? Change in percentage points of UK respondents indicating how much easier or harder is it to perform each activity in print or digital format from 2012 to 2015. Easier in print format than digital About the same in print and digital format Easier in digital format than print Reading cover to cover in depth -3.30 3.03 0.28 Reading a section in depth 3.63 -2.03 -1.60 Comparing treatment of ideas between monographs 10.92 -2.72 -8.20 Skimming in whole or in part 3.07 2.34 -5.41 Exploring references 10.46 -0.98 -9.48 Searching for a particular topic 11.85 -9.87 -1.98 17
  18. 18. DISCOVERY STARTING POINTS IN FLUX 18
  19. 19. DISCOVERY STARTING POINTS IN FLUX Below are four/five possible starting points for research in academic literature. Typically, when you are conducting academic research, which of these four/five starting points do you use to begin locating information for your research?  A specific electronic research resource/computer database  Your online library website or catalog  A general purpose search engine on the internet or world wide web  A national or international catalogue or database  The library building 19
  20. 20. DISCOVERY STARTING POINTS IN FLUX 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 20152012200920062003 A specific electronic research resource/computer database Your online library website or catalog A general purpose search engine on the internet or world wide web The library building Percent of US respondents who indicated that each option is the starting point for their research. 20
  21. 21. DISCOVERY STARTING POINTS IN FLUX Percent of UK respondents who indicated that each option is the starting point for their research. 21 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% A general purpose search engine on the internet or world wide web A specific electronic research resource/computer database Your online library website or catalogue A national or international catalogue or database The library building 2012 2015
  22. 22. DATA MANAGEMENT & PRESERVATION PROCESSES 22
  23. 23. DATA MANAGEMENT & PRESERVATION 23 Which of the following types of research data do you build up or collect for your own research?  Qualitative (such as open-ended survey responses, interview or focus group transcripts, laboratory or field notes, text, documents, images, video, audio, etc.)  Quantitative (such as numeric files, survey responses, geospatial data files, etc.)  Scientific (such as laboratory experimental data, slides, physical artefacts, biological specimens, samples, etc.)  Computational (such as models, algorithms, programs, scripts, etc.)
  24. 24. DATA MANAGEMENT & PRESERVATION Percentage of respondents who indicated that they build up or collect each type of data. 24 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Qualitative (such as open-ended survey responses, interview or focus group transcripts, laboratory or field notes, text, documents, images, video, audio, etc.) Quantitative (such as numeric files, survey responses, geospatial data files, etc.) Scientific (such as laboratory experimental data, slides, physical artefacts, biological specimens, samples, etc.) Computational (such as models, algorithms, programs, scripts, etc.) US UK
  25. 25. DATA MANAGEMENT & PRESERVATION 25 If these collections or sets of research data are preserved following the conclusion of the projects, what methods are used to preserve them?  I preserve these materials myself, using commercially or freely available software or services  I preserve these materials myself in a repository made available by my institution or another type of online repository  These materials are generally not preserved following the conclusion of a project  My campus or university library preserves these materials on my behalf  A publisher preserves these materials on my behalf alongside the final research output
  26. 26. DATA MANAGEMENT & PRESERVATION Percentage of respondents who indicated that each method is used. 26 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% I preserve these materials myself, using commercially or freely available software or services I preserve these materials myself in a repository made available by my institution or another type of online repository These materials are generally not preserved following the conclusion of a project My campus or university library preserves these materials on my behalf A publisher preserves these materials on my behalf alongside the final research output US UK
  27. 27. PUBLICATION PROCESSES 27
  28. 28. PUBLICATION PROCESSES 28 Are any of the following types of your research publications or products available online for free (such as via your personal webpage or an open access repository)?
  29. 29. PUBLICATION PROCESSES Percentage of respondents who indicated that each type is available online for free. 29 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Peer-reviewed journal articles or conference proceedings Pre-prints of peer-reviewed journal articles Data, images, media, or other primary source materials Blog or microblog posts Working papers or draft manuscripts Responses or comments to online versions of articles, blog posts, discussion forums, or social media conversations Books or monographs Software or code US UK
  30. 30. 30 Thank You
  31. 31. Digital scholarship centres Harriet Hemmassi, Brown 14/07/2016
  32. 32. Center for Digital Scholarship Harriette Hemmasi Joukowsky Family University Librarian JISC and CNI conference 2016 International Advances in Digital Scholarship
  33. 33. 2006 CDI web page
  34. 34. GARIBALDI PROJECT PARTNERS • Prof. Andy van Dam, Computer Science • Prof. Massimo Riva, Italian Studies • Brown University Library
  35. 35. RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT Multimedia Archive Amplified Display Interactive Multi-user Mapping Annotations Connection to Digital Repository
  36. 36. AUL for Digital Technologies Digital Scholarship Editor Designer for Online Publications Science Data Librarian Web Content Specialist Digital Preservation Librarian Digital Humanities Librarian Digital Repository Manager Data Visualization Coordinator Social Sciences Data Librarian Repurposing Library Positions and Redesigning Services & Programs…
  37. 37. Digital Publication DesignerDigital Scholarly Editor Brown Library: Center for Digital Scholarship Publication
  38. 38. Limited Engagement with Research Discover Retrieve Select Manage DesignAnalyze Document Communicate Revise Draft / Compose Open exchange Collaborate
  39. 39. Expanding Engagement with Research Discover Retrieve Select Manage DesignAnalyze Document Communicate Revise Draft / Compose Open exchange Collaborate
  40. 40. What Counts as Scholarship ”Publication” Re-Thought Method Evidence Discussion Revision Re-useDiscussion PROCESS AFTERMATH
  41. 41. From Shoemaker’s Scraps To Critical Assets
  42. 42. Brown Digital Repository Access and Preservation
  43. 43. Enhancing Scholarly Communication Howison et al. (2014) Genome Assembly by Bayesian Inference (GABI): Sample Report for PhiX174. https://repository.library.brown.edu/viewers/archive/bdr:351764/content/gabi- report/run1.html
  44. 44. (2000) (2014)
  45. 45. • Prof. Lincoln • Librarians • Students • Digitized collections • Brown Digital Repository THE THEATER THAT WAS ROME
  46. 46. IMAGE-LEVEL METADATA Subtitle di Giambatista Piranesi/ Architetto Veneziano/Tomo Secondo/Contenente gli avanzi/ de' monumenti sepolcrali/ Di Roma e dell'Agro Romano Contributors Piranesi, Giovanni Battista, 1720-1778 (artist) Rotilij, Angelo (publisher) Title Le antichità romane Series Theatre That was Rome
  47. 47. REPOSITORY PROVIDES ENABLING STRUCTURE FOR “THEATER THAT WAS ROME”
  48. 48. Develop Publish Evaluate BROWN’S INTERCONNECTED GOALS LIBRARY UNIVERSITY Preserve Credential Change
  49. 49. Tara Nummedal with Donna Bilak Columbia University Project Atalanta
  50. 50. Thank you! Harriette_Hemmasi@brown.edu
  51. 51. Digital scholarship centres Joan Lippincott,CNI 14/07/2016
  52. 52. Equipping the Researcher Digital Scholarship Centers Joan K. Lippincott, Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Jisc/CNI Conference 6 July 2016
  53. 53. What’s going on in digital scholarship? University of Oregon Archaeology and Landscape – Mongolia https://mongolianaltai.uoregon.edu/theproject.php
  54. 54. Creating new forms of content Emory Center for Digital Scholarship http://digitalscholarship.emory.edu/publications/index.html
  55. 55. Using GIS technologies in many disciplines University of Georgia Invasion of America Project http://www.ehistory.org/projects/invasion-of-america.html
  56. 56. Using tools for analysis HathiTrust Research Center https://www.hathitrust.org/htrc_collections_tools
  57. 57. Collaborative nature of research  Within the institution  Among institutions  Among individuals with different roles https://mongolianaltai.uoregon.edu/theproject.php
  58. 58. New forms SC T&L Tech & Tools Expertise Spaces Digital Scholarship Centers Bring Together Elements to Form a Program
  59. 59. What characterizes a digital scholarship center? Center  Library administered  Primary funding from institutional budget  Partners with and offers services to a variety of disciplines and users  Strong interest in lifecycle issues Institute  Faculty/academic department administered  Primary funding from project grants  Work on projects of affiliated faculty, often in defined discipline  Strong interest in answering new research questions
  60. 60. Why is a library a good place for a digital scholarship center?  Mission to support (e-)research and (digital) scholarship  Bring together expensive technologies for use by all campus departments  Bring together expertise to serve all campus departments  Support graduate and undergraduate students independently or through coursework
  61. 61. Data from participants in CNI Workshop 2014: What services are offered? N=21 Service Number Consult on digital technologies 21 Consult on digital preservation/curation 19 Workshops 19 Consult digital project management 18 Consult on intellectual property 13
  62. 62. What services are offered? N=21 Service Number Makerspace 9 + 2 3-D printers Media production studio 9 Visualization studio 8 Credit course 7 Certificate program 4 Average number of services offered per center = 7
  63. 63. Data from participants: Services offered - other  Grant writing assistance  Repository development/mgt  Project development  Data services  Imaging  Text analysis  Repository management  Internships  Grad student fellowships  Consult pedagogy/instructional technology  Usability lab  Seed grants  Conference  Community building
  64. 64. Providing a variety of work spaces and technologies Duke University The Edge
  65. 65. Offering workshops, courses, and training Arduino Workshop at McMaster
  66. 66. Involving students http://www.oxy.edu/center-digital-liberal-arts
  67. 67. Providing places for consultations Northeastern U. Digital Scholarship Center
  68. 68. Supporting graduate student fellows and post-docs McMaster Centre for Digital Scholarship
  69. 69. Developing a community McMaster Centre for Digital Scholarship
  70. 70. Creating a community of graduate student fellows University of Virginia Scholars’ Lab http://scholarslab.org/graduate-fellowships/
  71. 71. Sharing & displaying products of work UCLA Young Research Library
  72. 72. Sharing & displaying products of work Data Visualization at Hunt Library, NCSU
  73. 73. Making available new technologies & new spaces CURVE at Georgia State University http://sites.gsu.edu/curve/
  74. 74. Developing Makerspaces Makerspace at Hill Library, North Carolina State U.
  75. 75. Data from participants CNI survey 2014: What type of staff is involved in the center? Type of Staff Number of Centers Librarians 21 Information Technology Professionals 21 Graduate Students 15 Undergraduate Students 15 Multimedia Professionals 12 Faculty 11 Typically 4-6 types of staff per institution
  76. 76. Web resource http://www.cni.org/events/cni-workshops/digital-scholarship-centers- cni-workshop/  Workshop agenda and PPTs  Workshop report  Center profiles  Stay tuned for a report from an ECAR/CNI Working Group on Supporting Digital Humanities
  77. 77. Thank you!  Joan K. Lippincott  joan@cni.org  https://www.cni.org/about- cni/staff/joan-k- lippincott/publications  All photos are my own unless otherwise indicated Sign outside McMaster Centre for Digital Scholarship
  78. 78. Software carpentry and software skills and practice Neil Chue Hong, Software Sustainability Institute 14/07/2016
  79. 79. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Doing Science in the Digital Age: skills, tools and practice http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3467786 6th July 2016, Jisc/CNI Conference, Oxford Neil Chue Hong (@npch), Software Sustainability Institute ORCID: 0000-0002-8876-7606 |N.ChueHong@software.ac.uk Slides licensed under CC-BY where indicated: Supported by Project funding from
  80. 80. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Four Paradigms of Research
  81. 81. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Simulation science A water-swap reaction coordinate for the calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energies Woods CJ, Malaisree M, Hannongbua S, MulhollandAJ J. Chem. Phys. (2011) vol. 134, pp. 054114 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519057
  82. 82. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Data analysis for insight Selection at pleiotropic loci underlies disease co-occurrence in human populations. Navarro, Haley, Karosas et al. Submitted to Nature Genetics
  83. 83. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Behind every piece of science… #go through each SNP of interest for(my $x = 0; $x < scalar @pos; $x++) { #and then each downstream SNP of interest for(my $y = $x+1; $y < scalar @pos; $y++) { #if SNPs within our chosen distance (500kb) and both present in the haplotypes file if((!($trait[$x] eq $trait[$y])) && (abs($pos[$x] - $pos[$y]) <= 500000) && (exists($legArr { my $snp1ArrayPos = "”; my $snp2ArrayPos = "”; my $snp1All = "”; my $snp2All = "”; #create output file for this SNP pair my $filename = "ConditionedResults2/$chr[$x].$pos[$x]-$pos[$y].EHH.GBR.2.txt”; print "$filenamen”; unless (-e $filename) { open(OUT, ">$filename"); #####################CHANGE THESE IF NOT FOCUSING ON SECOND SNP#################### my $start = $pos[$y]-500000;
  84. 84. The UK research community relies on software Do you use research software? What would happen to your research without software Survey of researchers from 15 Russell Group universities conducted by SSI between August - October 2014. 406 respondents covering representative range of funders, discipline and seniority. 56% Develop their own software 71% Have no formal software training
  85. 85. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk The modern researcher… • … worries about:  Data management and analysis  Reproducible research  Scalable simulations  Integration of models and workflows  Collaboration Picture of Otto Stern courtesy of Emilio Segre Visual Archives
  86. 86. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Foundations of Digital Research Re- search Careers Recognition / Reward Skills and Capability
  87. 87. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Data Carpentry Software Skills Training Basic Advanced Programming Focussed (Tools) Research Focussed (methods) Software Carpentry Programming 101 Summer Schools Advanced HPC Training HPC Short CoursesMSc in Data Science / scientific computing Programming 201 Who fills this gap?
  88. 88. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Software Carpentry • Teaching basic lab skills for research computing  Open source: materials and community  In person, hands-on workshops (2+ days)  Scientists teaching scientists
  89. 89. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk
  90. 90. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Software Carpentry • Syllabus  bash --> automate tasks  python --> build modular code  git --> track and share work  SQL --> manage data  nose --> program defensively • Data Carpentry, Library Carpentry, HPC Carpentry, …  Extending the syllabus, retaining the methods / ethos
  91. 91. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk “Ancient Ethiopian genome reveals extensive Eurasian admixture throughout the African continent“ – the reputation of the science depends on the ability to trust
  92. 92. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Career Paths in UK Careers outside academic sector Non-university Research (industry, government etc.) ProfessorPermanent Research Staff Early Career Research PhDstudents Source: The Scientific Century, Royal Society, 2010 (revised to reflect first stage clarification from “What Do PhD’s Do?” study) UK STEM graduate career paths
  93. 93. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Lack of recognition and reward • There is an anachronism in the way we conduct and recognise research  REF references software as an output but it is still not easy to get recognition – peer review fails • Software careers  Researchers who use software  Researcher-Developers  Research Software Engineers  Research Software Support  Research Systems Providers
  94. 94. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk
  95. 95. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk RSE Fellows 2016 RSE Conference www.rse.ac.uk/c onf2016.html RSE Champions www.rse.ac.uk/c hampions
  96. 96. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk
  97. 97. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Software Sustainability Institute A national facility for cultivating better, more sustainable, research software to enable world- class research • Software reaches boundaries in its development cycle that prevent improvement, growth and adoption • Providing the expertise and services needed to negotiate to the next stage • Developing the policy and tools to support the community developing and using research software Supported by EPSRC Grant EP/H043160/1 + EPSRC/ESRC/BBSRC grant EP/N006410/1
  98. 98. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Research Culture Needs Change Things I get credit for: • Publishing papers • Getting grants • Societal impact (maybe) Things I don’t get credit for: • Releasing my software • Making my software easy to use • Supporting software for others to use • Investing effort in learning new tools • Being helpful IDEAS versus IMPLEMENTATION? Different forms of credit? Support?
  99. 99. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk T Vandewalle (2012) DOI: 10.1109/MCSE.2012.63
  100. 100. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk Equipping the researcher  Roles • Project Credit http://credit.casrai.org/ • Transitive Credit http://doi.org/10.5334/jors.be  Mechanisms • Software papers http://bit.ly/softwarejournals • Software citation e.g. Software Citation Working Group https://www.force11.org/group/software-citation-working-group  Tools • Researcher Identifiers e.g. ORCID http://orcid.org/ • Alt-Metrics e.g. ImpactStory http://impactstory.org/ • Software Management Plans • Software Assessment Framework
  101. 101. Software Sustainability Institute www.software.ac.uk T Research Culture Needs Changing Our research culture presents barriers but few incentives to equip researchers • There is a fear of being “found out” for poor software practice, but no encouragement or resources to improve computation and data management skills • There is no reward for publishing software in the current system of metrics. Researchers fear being “scooped” or losing ability to publish • Many organisations do not understand how to support researchers developing and publishing software Slides: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3467786
  102. 102. Equipping the researcher – patterns in the UK and US 14/07/2016 122

×