Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
Evocation, and Relational and 
Collaborative Research. 
Postmodern Psycho-ethnography 
in action: a 
European look to the ...
First of all… (or at the End…) 
What is the Muisca’s Colombian Ancestral Culture? 
I don’t know… 
Do I really want to know...
Background 
In the year 1973… 
Kenneth J. Gergen’s “Social Psychology as History” 
“It is the rare social psychologist who...
Method (for tis panel): Literature review 
Clifford, 1984; Gergen, 2009; 
Marcus, 1998; Tyler, 1987
Brief Inspirations… 
James Clifford 
• “An interest in the discursive aspects of cultural representation draws 
attention ...
Brief Inspirations… 
Stephen A. Tyler 
• “Now the ocular fairy tale is finished, the mirror broken”. P. 5. 
• “The fable o...
Brief Inspirations… 
George E. Marcus 
• Multi-sited spaces for research: Following the People, the Thing 
(through differ...
Brief Inspirations… 
Kenneth J. Gergen 
• “(…) the meaning of te performance is not te possession of the actor 
alone. Its...
Evocation. My (our) own definition 
and reflections 
“Dialogically recreate the situation or process without taking 
anyth...
Rosita Suárez is a Colombian Social Psychologist who has been working with original cultures 
during the last 30 years. I ...
Starting te trip 
“Each day they remind us that we are nature and invite us to 
live the teachings of the Elders, learning...
This is Bogotá, Colombia… 
Economical, comercial and cultural area
… and this is also Bogotá 
Canadá Güira neighborhood and Veinte de Julio church
And this… 
Canadá Güira neighborhood. Near to Entre Nubes park
Here is where theWorld began 
"The ‘Periquera’, ancestral name 
originated from the abundance of 
‘pericos’ (parrots) that...
Eldorado 
"Spanish people, and a little later English, took all the gold, quartz and emeralds. 
But they could not take th...
El Infiernito 
Here the Muiscas raised a genuine 
temple to the fertility of the land. The 
temple was made of giant phall...
A journey at the Marketplace. Villa de 
Leyva 
collaborative 
evocation
And now… It’s time to write!!! 
• When you are doing relational research, 
you are changing with the process 
• More than ...
We want to dialogue about a lot of things. But not only about the “exotic” ones. There are nothing “exotic” in 
the Colomb...
Discussion 
• Is this Social Science, or it is just ‘only’ a way 
of writing, as Literature or Poetry? 
• What consequence...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Poster Evocation, and Relational and Collaborative Research

Poster at the First International Meeting on Relational Research. Prague (Czech Republic). September 2014

  • Inicia sesión para ver los comentarios

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Poster Evocation, and Relational and Collaborative Research

  1. 1. Evocation, and Relational and Collaborative Research. Postmodern Psycho-ethnography in action: a European look to the Muisca’s Colombian Ancestral Culture Josep Seguí Dolz Escuela de Psicología School of Psychology Spain www.umansenred.com
  2. 2. First of all… (or at the End…) What is the Muisca’s Colombian Ancestral Culture? I don’t know… Do I really want to know it? I’m not sure Do I need to know it? I think no So What I’m doing here? I don’t know I don’t need to know it…
  3. 3. Background In the year 1973… Kenneth J. Gergen’s “Social Psychology as History” “It is the rare social psychologist whose values do not influence the subject of his research, his methods of observation, or terms of description”. Journal of Personality and Social Research. Vol. 26 No. 2. p. 311. Clifford Geertz’s “The Interpretation of Cultures” “Human thinking is, first of all, a public act developed making reference to the objective materials of common culture, and only second is an intimate, private matter”. Tanslated from Spanish edition. Barcelona: Gedisa. P. 82.
  4. 4. Method (for tis panel): Literature review Clifford, 1984; Gergen, 2009; Marcus, 1998; Tyler, 1987
  5. 5. Brief Inspirations… James Clifford • “An interest in the discursive aspects of cultural representation draws attention not to the interpretation of cultural ‘texts’ but to their relations of production”. P. 13. • “Etnographic texts are inescapably allegorical, and a serious acceptance of this fact changes the ways they can be written and read.” P. 99. • “Allegory draws special attention to the narrative character of cultural representations, to the stories built into the representational process itself”. P. 100. • “ Whatever else an etnography does, it translates experience into text. There are various ways of effecting this translation, ways that have significant ethical and political consequences”. P. 115. • “If we are condemned to tell stories we cannot control, may we not, at least, tell stories we believe to be true”. P. 121. Clifford, James and Marcus, George E. (Eds., 1984). Writing Culture. The Poetics and Politics of Ethography. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  6. 6. Brief Inspirations… Stephen A. Tyler • “Now the ocular fairy tale is finished, the mirror broken”. P. 5. • “The fable of participant observation both reveals and obscures the presence of the native, for participants implies a “doing together” which might include speaking together”. P. 98. • “Postmodern ethnography must be another kind of intertextuality whose project is not to reveal the other in univocal descripction (…). It must be instead, a fantasy of identities, a plurivocal evocation of difference making a unity in fantasy that mimics on every page (…)”. P. 102. • Evocation is neither presentation nor representation. It presents no objetcs and represents none, yet it makes available through absence what can be conceived. It is thus beyond truth and immune to the judgement of permormance. It overcomes the separation of the sensible and the conceivable, or form and content, of self and other, of language and the world”. P. 200. • “A postmodern ethnography is a cooperatively evolved text “, P. 202. Tyler, Stephen A. (1987). The Unspeakable. Discourse, Dialogue, and Rhetoric in the Postmodern World. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press.
  7. 7. Brief Inspirations… George E. Marcus • Multi-sited spaces for research: Following the People, the Thing (through different contexts), the Metaphor, the Plot, Story, or Allegory, the Life or Biography, the Conflict. P. 90-94. • “The collaborative ideal entails the notions that knowledge creation in fieldwork always involves negotiating a boundary between cultures and the result is never reducible to a form of knowledge that can be packaged in the monologic voice of the ethnographer alone”. P. 113. • Culture as the object of ethnography is predicated on the notion that the difference of others can be fully consumed, that is, assimilated to theory and description by cracking codes of structure, through better translation, and so forth. The postmodern idea of radical or surplus difference counters the liberal concept with the premise that difference can never be fully consumed, conquered, experienced, and thus that any interpretative framework must remain partly unresolved in a more serious sense than is usually stipulated as a matter of ‘good manners’ in doing interpretative work”. P. 186. Marcus, George E. (1998) Ethnoraphy through Thick & Thin. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  8. 8. Brief Inspirations… Kenneth J. Gergen • “(…) the meaning of te performance is not te possession of the actor alone. Its meaning is born in the coordination”. P. 74. • “We confront additional problems when we take writings from other cultures as evidence of universality”. P. 102. • “For the relational being there is no inside versus outside; there is only embodied action with others”. P. 138. • “We collaborate with others to create who we are”. P. 155. • “To understand each other is to coordinate our actions within the common scenarios of our culture”. P. 165. • “Consider, in contrast, the earlier account of multi-being (…). A more fully relational form of writing could indeed reveal te faces of multi-being.” P. 227. • “Scientific research is (…) a matter (…) of participating in a community of meaning makers to achieve goals valued by this community”. P. 238. Gergen, Kenneth J. (2009). Relational Being. Beyond Self and Community. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  9. 9. Evocation. My (our) own definition and reflections “Dialogically recreate the situation or process without taking anything for granted and taking everything that has been given for granted”. • Ok, but, what can I do with this? More, what I want to do with this? Or, what I’d like to do with this? • Perhaps I only want to come in dialogue with “Others”. Or perhaps I only want to write about exotic places and show beautiful pictures… Is this so? • We can evoke by writing, taking photographs or videos, making music, dancing,… • We can evoke to create a new reality with “Others” • What about credibility? All I can do is to be honest… Nothing else…
  10. 10. Rosita Suárez is a Colombian Social Psychologist who has been working with original cultures during the last 30 years. I was impressed reading her book (with anthropologist Carlos E. Pinzón), “’Lechuza’ women. History, Body and Witchery in Boyacá” (1992). Bogotá: CEREC. Se called me to help her in a research about indigenous mental health in Colombia. Why me? I don’t know anything about this matter!!! She just needed someone wo was not influenced by political and cultural context. Se needed someone “innocent”. I accepted her invitation… And… An example: a trip to the Unspeakable At the Colombian’s National University. Bogotá, December, 2013 Dialogue about the future of Social Constructionism in Latin America. Psychologists College. Bogotá, December, 2013
  11. 11. Starting te trip “Each day they remind us that we are nature and invite us to live the teachings of the Elders, learning from their wisdom; and to walk together the ways of life, hear the wind, the trees, the birds, the outdoors, gather our hearts to ‘thinking bonito’ and ‘thought knitting stitch by stitch’”. Rosita Suárez. • Such concepts as “nature”, “teachings”, “Elders”, “learning”, “wisdom”, … have not the same meaning for the Muiscas and for us. • “Thinking bonito” is not to think in the right way, or with good intentions, or something like this. I can’t translate “bonito” into English. I’m not sure what does it exactly mean. What I’m doing is to co-evoke with Rosita this and a lot of other meanings.
  12. 12. This is Bogotá, Colombia… Economical, comercial and cultural area
  13. 13. … and this is also Bogotá Canadá Güira neighborhood and Veinte de Julio church
  14. 14. And this… Canadá Güira neighborhood. Near to Entre Nubes park
  15. 15. Here is where theWorld began "The ‘Periquera’, ancestral name originated from the abundance of ‘pericos’ (parrots) that existed in this area, the barley river that forms seven waterfalls, were mythological place of worship of the spirits of the Muiscas, was energizated to accompany their gods, Bochica and Bochué, watchers from high in the Iguaque lagoon... ". There in Iguaque is where it all began ... Is this “true”? Why not?
  16. 16. Eldorado "Spanish people, and a little later English, took all the gold, quartz and emeralds. But they could not take the real treasure of Guatavita ..." (It is believed that the legend of Eldorado has its origins exactly in this place)
  17. 17. El Infiernito Here the Muiscas raised a genuine temple to the fertility of the land. The temple was made of giant phalluses. When the invaders arrived they were horrified. His spiritual colonists believed they were in hell, hence the name of this sacred space for original people, and proceeded to the temple's destruction. There are some pieces that help us to evoke ...
  18. 18. A journey at the Marketplace. Villa de Leyva collaborative evocation
  19. 19. And now… It’s time to write!!! • When you are doing relational research, you are changing with the process • More than change, from Collaborative Practices we prefer to talk about transformation • But it is not “Me” or my “Self” who is changing. It’s just the relationships with the “Others” which are transforming the reality • And, with this, the reality is transforming “Me”, whatever it is, I don’t mind… • The only thing I can do is to evoke the unspeakable “Other”. At the same time, and through the same process, the only thing I can say about “Me” is by evoking my relationships… Villa de Leyva square We are constructing a way of understanding between us, and, also, wishing to be understood by ‘Others’…
  20. 20. We want to dialogue about a lot of things. But not only about the “exotic” ones. There are nothing “exotic” in the Colombian’s social reality. Everything is “real”, very real… And present, too much present… I want to know more and more about the Muisca’s culture. But also about the social problem of the displaced people because of the war and violence, for example. People that I have seen and known in the Canadá Güira neighborhood… From our text in process: Josep - “I’m feeling a little as Barley’s ‘Innocent Anthropologist’*. I am a guest (with a tribute to Harlene Anderson!**) in a country and in a culture that I don’t know anything about. I am in a country from which I only receive news that have nothing to do with reality, whatever this is. Yes, Rosita is my ‘informant’, in a classical sense. She explains to me a lot of things. Step by step I’m surprised with everything. Sometimes I’m afraid. Now I think I understand something. Then my understanding is blurred. I am sure of my wisdom illustrated backed by two thousand five hundred years of rational knowledge from classical Greece. But the next minute I think I know nothing; I absolutely can’t understand anything of what I'm seeing in this chaotic, but beautiful and friendly in many ways, city. The Monserrate greets me. As always, wherever you are in Bogotá”. Rosita – “There are many stories, memories that constructs our "identities". Unlike Mexico or Peru we did not have a dominant group with features of state. We had many and various. A few more warriors than others. The Caribbean, as called by conquerors, were the inhabitants of these lands. The interior was Muiscas. Bacatá was the territory of Zipa Sagipa. It means "Country Farm“, and Bogotá "territory minga, or of the Supreme Being." The minga is a collective work in which each person contributes. BOGOTA meaning: BO = Divinity, GO = Collective Work, TA = Farm. This territory is under the custody of two large hills: Monserrate and Guadalupe, names assigned by the Spaniards. They are the guardians, the great "legs", foundations and strengths of ancestral territory. I understand your feeling, when you say Monserrate is "greeting you, wherever you are." True, for the citizens of Bogotá, Monserrate and Guadalupe are our guide and reference. If we feel lost, we seek the hills to guide us”. * Barley, Nigel (1983). The Innocent Anthropologist. Notes from a Mud Hut. Illinois: Waveland Press. ** Anderson, Harlene (1997). Conversation, Language, and Possibilities. A Postmodern Aproach to Therapy. New York: BasicBooks.
  21. 21. Discussion • Is this Social Science, or it is just ‘only’ a way of writing, as Literature or Poetry? • What consequences can evocation have to the work of the social researcher, or psychologist in general? • It could be a new or complementary way of doing collaborative and relational research processes in the field • We need to explore more all the possibilities… THANK YOU!!!

×