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UX Field Research Toolkit - Updated for Big Design 2018

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UX Field Research Toolkit - Updated for Big Design 2018

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Looking for practice with in-depth UXR fieldwork methods? You may have read about these techniques in the past, but methods must be practiced to be understood. projekt202 has been employing the experience research craft with great success since 2003. This workshop is your opportunity to try these tools of the trade in a structured environment without pressing deadlines or looming stakeholders. Our experienced research and design professionals will share industry tips and tricks that will help you put theory to practice.

The workshop will be hands-on and interactive; instructional elements will be reinforced with stories of impact to real projects. We will not only cover methods of gathering user data, but the importance of spending time internalizing and analyzing the data through activities such as affinity diagramming, persona building, and journey mapping. Participants will gain exposure to these important practices in a low-pressure atmosphere and with the guidance of experienced professionals.

Looking for practice with in-depth UXR fieldwork methods? You may have read about these techniques in the past, but methods must be practiced to be understood. projekt202 has been employing the experience research craft with great success since 2003. This workshop is your opportunity to try these tools of the trade in a structured environment without pressing deadlines or looming stakeholders. Our experienced research and design professionals will share industry tips and tricks that will help you put theory to practice.

The workshop will be hands-on and interactive; instructional elements will be reinforced with stories of impact to real projects. We will not only cover methods of gathering user data, but the importance of spending time internalizing and analyzing the data through activities such as affinity diagramming, persona building, and journey mapping. Participants will gain exposure to these important practices in a low-pressure atmosphere and with the guidance of experienced professionals.

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UX Field Research Toolkit - Updated for Big Design 2018

  1. 1. UX Research Tool Kit Methods to start you on your way to user discovery Kelly Moran & Jessie Webster @kel_moran @JessieWebster15 Sept. 20, 2018 10:00-4:30
  2. 2. Kelly Moran | Principal Experience Researcher Anthropology: pursuing unusual questions, finding unexpected answers, and just anthropologating in general. Jessie Webster | Experience Researcher Journalism: Gaining a deep understanding of users needs and motivations by uncovering their story, and sharing that story with those who can make a difference. Your Instructors @kel_moran @JessieWebster15 View this Deck at: www.slideshare.net/KellyMoran 2
  3. 3. TODAY’S SYLLABUS 1 2 3 4 5 6 Intro to UX Field Research Establishing Expectations Contextual Inquiries Affinity Diagramming Delivering Insight Ethical Considerations 7 Avoiding Pitfalls 3
  4. 4. UX FIELD RESEARCH AN INTRODUCTION TO 4
  5. 5. Satisfying the catSATISFYING THE CAT 5
  6. 6. 75-95% of new products fail 6
  7. 7. 75-95% of new products fail 7
  8. 8. “…we are using coordinated research efforts to understand our new readers, and build the best product and editorial experience possible.” -medium.com “How we are Using Design Research to Launch The New York Times in Espanol, Juliette Melton, Feb 2016 8
  9. 9. Using Research in Software User-focused research of some kind should be used when: • Major changes and updates • Replatforming • Underperformance from a sales perspective • New offerings • You, or anyone else with a stake in the product, can’t confidently complete the sentence “My users love this software because ________.” 9
  10. 10. EXPECTATIONS ESTABLISHING 10
  11. 11. Covering your Bases • Establishing Stakeholder expectations and concerns (success and risks, industry factors…) • Secondary research. Due diligence. • Building a protocol • Being prepared • Identifying high-level goals - What are your "big questions?" 11
  12. 12. Guiding Questions • No one is using our new dashboard. Why? • We want to add to our line of offerings but we're not sure what our customers really need, or why they're coming to our service. • Why are so many customers having to call and get help with ________? • Why is our mobile traffic increasing but our conversion rates are going down? • We are advertising like crazy but we cannot seem to increase adoption. Why? 12
  13. 13. Guiding Questions • How are our users using our new dashboard? • How are our users accomplishing their tasks now? • … These are questions that will have a descriptive answer. 13
  14. 14. Qualitative Quantitative Numbers What? / How many? Descriptions How? / Why? Qualitative vs. Quantitative 14
  15. 15. Qualitative Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Satisfaction Scores Contextual Inquiries Personas Journey Maps Workflow Diagrams Affinity Diagramming Validation Testing Usability Testing Qualitative vs. Quantitative 15
  16. 16. Scoping a Project • Length of time to allow for research data collection depends on the complexity of the problem. Will you need to see work happen over time to capture the full spectrum of seasonal activity? • Generally, you should observe a minimum of 3-5 participants per user type (manager, approver, account reviewer, large business user, small business user…) • Typical project 12-20 participants 16
  17. 17. Who is Involved? • Everyone who makes decisions about the product needs an invitation to a kick-off and all major updates. • Anyone who works with the product or its users should receive a courtesy announcement of upcoming research or ongoing progress. • If they don’t know about it, they can’t support it. 17
  18. 18. MEET & GREET YOUR TABLE 18
  19. 19. FIELD RESEARCH CONDUCTING 19
  20. 20. OBSERVATION REPORTED DATA V. 20
  21. 21. “Making the familiar strange and the strange familiar” http://www.gizmocrazed.com/2012/04/top-10-theories-on-how-the-world-will-end/ 21
  22. 22. “We have everything set up for you in a conference room.” 22
  23. 23. What do you see? 23
  24. 24. 5 out of 6 of the client-user groups observed used two monitors Adding machines still in use Typically in either a cube or an open workspace Paper everywhere - post its galore! User observed walking to a locked room (with a broken ankle) to look up reference numbers Contextual Lessons 24
  25. 25. INQUIRIES CONTEXTUAL 25
  26. 26. What’s a Contextual Inquiry? A qualitative form of research • Participants are observed in their actual work or life environments • Surfaces information participants typically have trouble articulating (like air) • Reveals insights beyond what is passively observable • Exposes goals, aspirations and values Provides an understanding of: • Context • Actions, strategies, and issues currently experienced with the product • Specific qualities of the population • Exposes goals, aspirations and values 26
  27. 27. What does a CI involve? Observation Session • Consent form allows for photo, audio, and/or video to be captured • A facilitator guides activity and dialog • An observer thoroughly documents the session (don’t be shy with photos!) • The team’s relationship with the participant is crucial to obtain good data • Summarize what you think you heard and let the participant comment or correct you Debrief with your team after every session — share what you learned! 27
  28. 28. REPORTED V. OBSERVED ACTIVITY 28
  29. 29. • My drive is approximately 18 min one way • 5 minutes to get the highway, on the highway for only 10 minutes, I drive 79mph • I listen to NPR on my drive • I go the same way every day. Neighborhood, Highway, drop off kids, and back. • I make sure I’ve got water to drink My Commute 29
  30. 30. [Switch to Video Deck]ADD the VIDEO!!! (And have backup on a flash drive) 30
  31. 31. What did you notice? 31
  32. 32. • Backs out of a garage, closes door. • Continuously changing the radio station. • Drives over a bunch of potholes • Multitasking at red lights • There were 2 waters. • Checks Fitbit. You may have seen… 32
  33. 33. GUIDE INTERVIEW 33
  34. 34. Building an Interview Guide • The process of building a protocol establishes team consensus on the purpose of the project and the goals of the research • Following the protocol onsite keeps you organized and on track • Familiarizing yourself with the protocol ahead of time means the session can flow naturally while you allow occasional diversions to interesting new lines of inquiry 34
  35. 35. DRAFT AN INTERVIEW GUIDE ACTIVITY 35
  36. 36. 36
  37. 37. 37
  38. 38. DRAFT AN INTERVIEW GUIDE ACTIVITY 38
  39. 39. INTERVIEW CONDUCTING THE 39
  40. 40. INTERVIEW EACH OTHER ACTIVITY 40
  41. 41. What to Note • Important actions that happen repeatedly • Things that change the course or flow of work • Workaround and breakdowns • Interruptions (if not one-offs) • Communication (who, why?) 41
  42. 42. Not so useful note: She saves invoices in Outlook. This note doesn’t tell us anything besides a procedural fact. Useful note: She opens an Outlook folder she previously set-up for saving invoices and drags her file in. She saves invoices here because, "I can find exactly what I'm looking for" when she uses the search feature. This contains “why,” the context of the note, and her motivation for doing what she’s doing Examples 42
  43. 43. What’s Your Number? 43
  44. 44. Interview 44
  45. 45. INTERVIEW EACH OTHER ACTIVITY 45
  46. 46. HEARD SHARING WHAT WE 46
  47. 47. Knowledge Share A way to bring the new knowledge held in your head outside to share with the full team. • What you learned, what surprised you • Top quotes • Breakdowns • Experiment with ways to visualize flow or order • Call out any potential opportunities 47
  48. 48. USER SHRINES ACTIVITY 48
  49. 49. DATA RE-EXPERIENCE THE 49
  50. 50. Repetition repetition… Re-experiencing your research Best Practice: • Listen to the audio or watch the video. In full. Good Practice: • Review your and your research partner’s notes. 50
  51. 51. Benefits • See it from a fresh perspective (this time you are a pure observer) • Utilize new knowledge from the debrief session • Identify more nuanced observations - like watching a movie the second time when now you know how it turns out • Catch something you missed the first time 51
  52. 52. Lunch 52
  53. 53. DIAGRAMMING AFFINITY 53
  54. 54. “Never theorize before you have data. Invariably you end up twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts.” - Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle) 54
  55. 55. Let’s Practice 55
  56. 56. Let’s Practice Color Seed Arrangement 56
  57. 57. Exclude (there are always exceptions) • Demographics • Workflow details that have already been captured in user workflows or diagrams • Artifact/data inventory • Physical artifact descriptions What Notes to Include Each note should stand alone as a coherent statement Include • Direct quotes • Observed actions • Motivations, goals • Key elements of the work practice • Breakdowns (optional; these may be better aggregated in a separate list) 57
  58. 58. Affinity Diagram in Action He is confused because of the many titles and options on the
 product website.
 -P1 58
  59. 59. Affinity Diagram in Action 59
  60. 60. Affinity Diagram in Action 60
  61. 61. Affinity Diagram in Action 61
  62. 62. Affinity Diagram in Action 62
  63. 63. 63
  64. 64. Example: Affinity Diagram - 2 levels 64
  65. 65. Example: Affinity Diagram - 3 levels 65
  66. 66. Keeping things in context NOTE THEME While he mentioned wanting a bank account for his kids' future, he also had no interest in having one now and expressed distrust of banks. When pressed he didn't have any actionable plan of getting an account and said he'd get one for his kids, "If it's decent enough, where I'm not gonna break my back doing all this extra stuff like $20 fees a month, like some banks." Distrust of Banks "It's live checks [my paychecks]. I'd rather cash my check and keep my money like that, than trust a bank with it. Because anything can happen, with a bank. Something can happen with their number, I don't know, just anything can happen where my money's not gonna be my money." Trust in Cash; Distrust of Banks "I'd rather just cash a check and have my money, that way it's easier for me to manage it, without having a secondary source, other than the people that cash my check." Managing Money 66
  67. 67. AFFINITY DIAGRAM ACTIVITY 67
  68. 68. Exclude (there are always exceptions) • Demographics • Workflow details that have already been captured in user workflows or diagrams • Artifact/data inventory • Physical artifact descriptions What Notes to Include Each note should stand alone as a coherent statement Include • Direct quotes • Observed actions • Motivations, goals • Key elements of the work practice • Breakdowns (optional; these may be better aggregated in a separate list) 68
  69. 69. How do we use our insights? User Needs Opportunities Design Principles 13© 2014 projekt202, LLC. All Rights Reserved Up-to-date, accurate, and relevant information must be available at the salesperson’s fingertips, across connected platforms and tools. Sales people need to create trust and the perception of transparency to build a great relationship with each Mercedes-Benz customer. The high-pressure, interactive, collaborative nature of the dealership environment requires that tools fit seamlessly where, when, and how they are used. When time means money, specific information needs to be accessed quickly in every circumstance. Tools need to be flexible for salespeople as they adapt their selling style to the customer’s needs, communication style, and pacing expectations. Sales people need to be empowered to be THE respected Mercedes-Benz expert in all client interactions. This set of design guidelines — based on real user needs — should be used to direct and evaluate future explorations of tools for sales consultants. 2. Simplify Access 5. Show Integrity 1. Fit to Context 3. Maintain Speed 4. Tailor Communication 6. Embody Expertise User Experience Principles EXPERIENCE RECOMMENDATIONS 69
  70. 70. INSIGHTS DELIVERING 70
  71. 71. PERSONAS UX 71
  72. 72. Useful marketing tool Identifies groups of customers (or potential customers) in a market Includes demographics and buying tendencies Opinion and preference focused Based on market data and analytics Used for distribution of brand message Useful user experience tool Identifies archetypes within the user population Includes goals, motivations, and frustrations Behavior focused Built on primary research Informs design and development UX Personas Market Segmentation vs. 72
  73. 73. UX Personas Strong UX Personas: • Act as summaries of the user types discovered during research activities. • Describe the goals and observed behavior patterns among users and end users. • Make user types and roles memorable and relatable. Personas provide personality, but they are not license for over-the-top comedic or dramatic flare. They are data- based and grounded in reality. 73
  74. 74. Personas not built on data are a creative writing exercise. UX Personas UX Personas are built after all major research activities are complete: • Stakeholder and expert interviews • Background / external research • Contextual inquiries 74
  75. 75. Role Based Persona 75
  76. 76. Behavior Based Persona 76 Opportunities: …
  77. 77. Building UX Personas (1 of 4) 1. Identify behavioral and demographic attributes (ie. variables) that appear predicative of attitudes and actions • Mental models, motivations, goals, skill levels… • Ex: Experience with technology, time in company, main reason for using the software, openness to learning, time available for the task… 77
  78. 78. 4 Length of commute 50 miles0 miles 4 3 3 Time in Car 90 minutes5 minutes 3 22 Number of stops 4 0 3 4 5 3 Multitasking ConstantNever TBD xy 3 TBD xy Attribute Scales 78
  79. 79. Building UX Personas (2 of 4) 2. Map each participant on a scale for every attribute From: Kim Goodwin, Ge#ng from Research to Personas: Harnessing the Power of Data, May 15, 2008. h8p://www.cooper.com/journal/2008/05/geAng_from_research_to_personas 79
  80. 80. 4 43 21 Length of commute 50 miles0 miles 4 3 3 4 3 21 Time in Car 90 minutes5 minutes 3 224 3 21 Number of stops 4 0 3 4 5 3 432 1 Multitasking ConstantNever 4 32 1 TBD xy 3 43 21 TBD xy Plotted Participants 80
  81. 81. Building UX Personas (3 of 4) 3. Identify patterns among those attributes From: Kim Goodwin, Ge#ng from Research to Personas: Harnessing the Power of Data, May 15, 2008. h8p://www.cooper.com/journal/2008/05/geAng_from_research_to_personas 81
  82. 82. 4 43 21 Length of commute 50 miles0 miles 4 3 3 4 3 21 Time in Car 90 minutes5 minutes 3 224 3 21 Number of stops 4 0 3 4 5 3 432 1 Multitasking ConstantNever 4 32 1 TBD xy 3 43 21 TBD xy Plotted Participants 82
  83. 83. Building UX Personas (4 of 4) 4. Identify and explain the patterns suggested by the attribute profiles. • List out key tasks/responsibilities or motivations and approaches that seem to explain these patterns 5. Develop profiles based on these 6. Clarify the distinctions, add useful detail, and develop the narrative 83
  84. 84. The colored dots represent where the individual participants fell on the spectra. The colored sticky notes indicate groupings of participants that can be built into personas. EXAMPLE SPECTRA 84
  85. 85. UX PERSONAS ACTIVITY 85
  86. 86. maps JOURNEY 86
  87. 87. The User’s Journey • Journey maps show a user-centric viewpoint of your product or service. They are not “process flows” • They highlight breakdowns, workarounds, communication points, hand-offs, and (when applicable) observed delight factors Don’t forget to include “the edges” of your map. Entry and exit points, important boundaries, etc. 87
  88. 88. Jared Spool keynote at Delight 2013 88
  89. 89. Example: Journey Map 89
  90. 90. Example: Journey Map 90
  91. 91. 91 Basic Journey Map Structure
  92. 92. Using Journey Maps Journey maps should: • Align the values of the user and the organization • Encourage empathy • Organize the experience into digestible segments Tip: A current journey map can be built first based on research and then contrasted with an ideal-state future journey map based on opportunities and user scenarios. 92
  93. 93. maps JOURNEY 93
  94. 94. CONSIDERATIONS ETHICAL 94
  95. 95. Ethical Considerations & Responsibilities • Being transparent - with everyone. (Stakeholders, internal team, participants.) • Never be sneaky. That's never a good plan. • Providing anonymity, when needed, and just using good sense in all the other times. Ask yourself, would I want my boss knowing I said this? Would this embarrass me if it went public? 95
  96. 96. Sharing Photos and Video • The artifacts of your research process - quotes, photographs, video clips - can be a powerful way to build internal knowledge of the users’ struggles, needs, and joys. • Be sure you obtained the necessary consent for the level of sharing you want to do. Remember though that these things came from someone else’s life experiences, and they aren’t “yours.” So share respectfully. 96
  97. 97. Recommended Reading Contextual Design KAREN HOLZBLATT & HUGH BEYER Contextual Design: Design for Life, Second Edition, describes the core techniques needed to deliberately produce a compelling user experience. Contextual design was first invented in 1988 to drive a deep understanding of the user into the design process. It has been used in a wide variety of industries and taught in universities all over the world. Just Enough Research ERIKA HALL Design research is a hard slog that takes years to learn and time away from the real work of design, right? Wrong. Good research is about asking more and better questions, and thinking critically about the answers. It's something every member of your team can and should do, and which everyone can learn, quickly. And done well, it will save you time and money by reducing unknowns and creating a solid foundation to build the right thing, in the most effective way. It’s Our Research TOMER SHARON Design research is a hard slog that takes years to learn and time away from the real work of design, right? Wrong. Good research is about asking more and better questions, and thinking critically about the answers. It's something every member of your team can and should do, and which everyone can learn, quickly. And done well, it will save you time and money by reducing unknowns and creating a solid foundation to build the right thing, in the most effective way. 97
  98. 98. PITFALLS AVOIDING 98
  99. 99. “We already know this. 99
  100. 100. Other Tips • Locate an executive champion - to open doors • Identify gatekeepers - for access to users • Tell the compelling story - to build empathy 100
  101. 101. “The reason design projects that neglect research fail isn’t because of a lack of knowledge. It’s because of a lack of shared knowledge. Creating something of any complexity generally requires several different people with different backgrounds and different priorities to collaborate on a goal.” - https://deardesignstudent.com/the-secret-cost-of-research-fbe95739afdd#.d6wx7nmkz “A design project is simply a series of decisions. When you’re working with competent people, the limiting factor on how quickly you can finish a project is the speed of decision-making.”
  102. 102. Don’t Miss These Great Talks: 102 John Keese: Animation: The Fine Line Between Intuitive and Distracting Friday Sept 21, 4:00 - Bluebonnet Room Stop by the Voter Registration Booth Kelly Moran: The UX of Ethics Friday Sept 21, 4:00 - The Loft Joe Dyer: Scientific Underpinnings of UX Research - Model the Scientific Method Friday Sept 21, 1:30 - The Loft Jeremy Johnson: Businesses Want Results, Not Empathy Maps Saturday Sept 22, 11:00 - South Side Ballroom Chelsea Soprano & Josh Christopher: Crafting a Design Challenge for Evaluating UX Candidates - Friday Sept 21, 11:00 - Bluebonnet Room *Check the conference schedule for potential room or time changes
  103. 103. Ask Questions You are not an expert at others’ work/play - even if you think you are Rephrase and ask if you got it right Avoid leading questions Take note of ideas and ask “What problem does this solve?” 103
  104. 104. Start Small - Start Anywhere! Does not need to cover 7 regions across a continent (seeing a few users makes a difference) Get into the environment (supplement with Skype if needed) Don’t go in with solutions in mind (don’t be too sure you know the problems already either) 104
  105. 105. UX Research Tool Kit Methods to start you on your way to user discovery Kelly Moran & Jessie Webster @kel_moran @JessieWebster15 Presented at Big Design September 20, 2018 10:00-4:30 View this Deck at: www.slideshare.net/KellyMoran
  106. 106. Don’t Miss These Great Talks: 106 John Keese: Animation: The Fine Line Between Intuitive and Distracting Friday Sept 21, 4:00 - Bluebonnet Room Stop by the Voter Registration Booth Kelly Moran: The UX of Ethics Friday Sept 21, 4:00 - The Loft Joe Dyer: Scientific Underpinnings of UX Research - Model the Scientific Method Friday Sept 21, 1:30 - The Loft Jeremy Johnson: Businesses Want Results, Not Empathy Maps Saturday Sept 22, 11:00 - South Side Ballroom Chelsea Soprano & Josh Christopher: Crafting a Design Challenge for Evaluating UX Candidates - Friday Sept 21, 11:00 - Bluebonnet Room *Check the conference schedule for potential room or time changes

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