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Shattering the Glass Screen: Gender inequality in media and entertainment

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New McKinsey research suggests women remain locked out of top roles in media and entertainment. A more diverse cast is required.

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Shattering the Glass Screen: Gender inequality in media and entertainment

  1. 1. Copyright @ 2019 McKinsey & Company. All rights reserved. Women in the Workplace 2019 5TH YEAR
  2. 2. McKinsey & Company 2 Five years of Women in the Workplace Women in the Workplace is a multi-year joint research effort by McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.org and the largest comprehensive study of the state of women in corporate America This year, 329 companies employing +13M people participated and +68,500 employees were surveyed on their workplace experiences Since 2015… Participating companies ~600 Employees in participating companies 22 million Employees surveyed on their workplace experiences +250,000 In-depth 1-on-1 interviews +100
  3. 3. McKinsey & Company 3 Diversity leaders are pulling ahead, and reaping the benefits 1. Likelihood of financial outperformance by executive team gender diversity quartile: calculated as the share of companies in the respective diversity quartile outperforming the industry benchmark by region, based on average EBIT margin across the 3-5 years. 2014 report includes years 2011-2013, and companies from North America, Brazil, Spain and the UK. The 2017 report includes years 2011-2015, and companies from North America, Asia-Pacific, Continental Europe, Latin America, and Sub-Saharan Africa. The 2019 report includes years 2014-2018, and the same regions as 2017 2. McKinsey: Delivering through Diversity. Financial likelihood to outperform based on EBIT margin from 2011-2015 above industry avg.; Ethnicity defined as all non-white ethnicities. In the US, we also include Hispanic/Latino of any race Source: McKinsey 2019 Diversity Wins +24% Gender diverse companies are 24% more likely to outperform less diverse companies1 +33% Ethnically diverse companies are 33% more likely to outperform less diverse companies2 McKinsey & Company 3
  4. 4. McKinsey & Company 44 As the workforce changes, diversity and inclusion is becoming a must have Employees under 30 are particularly focused on diversity and inclusion Younger employees are almost 2x more likely to raise the need for diversity and inclusion than older employees1 Younger employees are more likely to see bias in the workplace than older employees1 McKinsey & Company 4 1. Compares employees in middle-management under the age of 30 to employees in middle-management between the ages 50-60 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research McKinsey & Company 4
  5. 5. McKinsey & Company 5 21 17 26 23 30 27 34 32 38 37 In corporate America, we see encouraging progress at the top, yet women remain underrepresented at all levels % of employees by level1 2019 % of women 2015 48 45 +24%+9%+9%+8%+3%5 year change +6% Bright spot: Women’s representation in the C-suite increased by 24% since 2015 Gains at the top over the last five years have been for both white women and women of color Women remain underrepresented: only 1 in 5 C-suite executives is a woman and only 1 in 25 is a woman of color 1. Due to rounding, representation by race and gender may sum to 101 percent or 99 percent within some levels. 10 18 68 10 21 64 12 24 57 14 26 51 17 27 45 C-suite 4 SVP 5 VP 7 Sr. Manager/ Director 9 Manager 12 Men of color White women Women of color White men Entry level 18 16 30 35 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research
  6. 6. McKinsey & Company 6 In Media and Entertainment, the pipeline of women is better at the entry-level but drops off at the C-suite Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace pipeline data for U.S./Canada Note: Numbers may not add exactly to 100% due to rounding 1. Aggregate results from participating companies in Media & Entertainment (15 companies submitted pipeline data) 2. Aggregate results from Press Forward data (8 companies submitted pipeline data) 3. Aggregate results from 320 companies that reported their pipeline data, weighted by industry to the F500 % of women across all companies3 48% 38% 34% 26% 21%30% Entry level: Compared to corporate America, there are more women entering at entry- level for Media and Entertainment but slightly less women for News Senior levels: Compared to corporate America, both Media and Entertainment and News have a slightly higher representation of women at SVP and C-suite levels Women representation across the pipeline in Media and Entertainment1 Women representation across the pipeline in News2 C-suiteSVPVP Sr. Manager/ DirectorManagerEntry level Men of color White women Women of color White men Men of color White women Women of color White men 8 22 65 4 2 22 71 5 7 33 50 10 5 35 51 9 9 32 53 6 7 30 59 4 11 36 43 11 10 32 47 10 14 35 36 14 14 31 42 14 17 16 33 34 14 14 32 39 Women of color are less represented in News compared to both Media and Entertainment and corporate America, particularly in the VP level Percent of employees by gender within each level
  7. 7. McKinsey & Company 7 Overall in corporate America, companies are adding women in the C-suite The power of 3 or more women executives Companies with 3+ women in the C-suite, % 29 2015 2019 1. Wellesley Centers for Women, Critical Mass on Corporate Boards: Why Three or More Women Enhance Governance 2. Based on McKinsey & Company's "Diversity Wins" research comparing companies with 30% more women on executive boards to companies with 0-10% women, on an average executive board size of 13 3 is the critical mass needed for minorities to influence decision making more substantially1 71% more likely to financially outperform compared to C-suites with less than 3 women2 750 employees roll up on average to a C-suite executive 5 years average tenure of a C-suite executive 29 44 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research
  8. 8. McKinsey & Company 8 And the “broken rung” at the first step up to manager is the primary barrier preventing women from reaching the top Women are promoted at lower rates than men – Black women and Latinas are more likely to be held back Representation of women, % Most women are getting left behind at the first step up to manager ManagerEntry-level 38 48 All Men 100 All Women 72 Latinas 68 Black Women 58 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research For every 100 men…
  9. 9. McKinsey & Company 9 However, for women in Media & Entertainment, the primary issue is promotion rate of women to the VP and C-suite levels Promotions at the very top: For women in News, there were no promotions from SVP to C-suite in 2019 for reporting companies Promotion rates by position for Media and Entertainment, % Men Women Entry level Manager Senior manager Vice president Senior vice president C-suite 3 3 4 3 1 6 7 2 11 0 Promotion rates by position for all other industries, % Men Women Entry level Manager Senior manager Vice president Senior vice president C-suite 9 6 4 3 5 6 6 4 4 4 Promotion rates by position for News, % Men Women Entry level Manager Senior manager Vice president Senior vice president C-suite 2 3 3 3 0 3 4 2 6 0 Promotions at the bottom: At the lowest organizational levels, women in Media and Entertainment are promoted at twice the rate of men Promotions at the top: Compared to corporate America, promotion rates for both Media and Entertainment and News slow substantially from SVP to C-Suite
  10. 10. McKinsey & Company 10 And for news organizations specifically, attrition of women is another driver of a tilted pipeline early on Attrition rates by gender in News organizations, % Entry level 13 15 12 13 11 12 7 20 6 3 8 7 Manager Senior Manager Vice President Senior Vice President C-suite Men Women
  11. 11. McKinsey & Company 11McKinsey & Company 11 Culture of work
  12. 12. McKinsey & Company 12 To reach equality, companies need to invest in creating a strong culture 12 Equal opportunity and fairness Changing the numbers is not enough. Companies need to focus on these areas to improve the workplace for everyone: A safe, respectful workplace Work-life flexibility McKinsey & Company 12
  13. 13. McKinsey & Company 13 Equal opportunity and fairness are important - together, they are the biggest predictors of employee satisfaction and retention When employees believe they have equal opportunity and the workplace is fair, they are… 3x more likely to say they are happy with their career 3x more likely to plan to stay at their company longer 3x more likely to recommend their company Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research
  14. 14. McKinsey & Company 14 In Media and Entertainment, women and men in have similar levels of job and career satisfaction overall 78 76 77 75 83 82 Men Women Job satisfaction Career satisfaction Desire for promotion McKinsey & Company 14
  15. 15. McKinsey & Company 15 However, while employees across all industries think they have equal opportunity — they are less convinced the system is fair for all % of employees across all industries who agree Women with disabilities Black women Fairness The best opportunities go to the most deserving employees 3138402839414248 Bisexual womenAll men Lesbian women Asian women Latinas White women Opportunity I have equal opportunity for growth and development 6670566263 5469 69 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research Men Women Specific groups (e.g., Black women and women with disabilities) are far less likely to think that they have equal opportunity and that the system is fair People are more optimistic about their personal opportunities than they are to think that the system is fair for everyone
  16. 16. McKinsey & Company 16 Women in Media and Entertainment say their gender hinders their advancement opportunities Employees who think gender will affect their ability to seize future opportunities, % of respondents Employees who think gender is affecting their ability to seize current opportunities, % of respondents Women being judged by different standards than men is the biggest challenge to achieving gender parity in management, % of respondents who agree 35 15 Women Men 2.3x 27 7 Women Men 3.9x 47 20Men Women 2.3x McKinsey & Company 16
  17. 17. McKinsey & Company 17 Key practices shape how employees view opportunity and fairness 1 6 out of 323 companies do the following practices for all employees: set diversity targets, require diverse slates, establish clear and consistent evaluation criteria before review processes begin, require unconscious bias training for employees Women and men receive similar levels of manager support and sponsorship across Media & Entertainment Men Women 33% 34% % of employees who say their managers help them navigate organizational politics % of employees who say they have 1 or more sponsors Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research 46% 45% There are clear best practices in hiring and promotions, but not enough companies deploy them Only 2% of all companies have all the practices in place for all employees1 Set diversity targets Require diverse slates of candidates Establish clear and consistent evaluation criteria before the process begins Require unconscious bias training for evaluators Manager support Sponsorship1 Media & Entertainment All companies Media & Entertainment All companies 32% 32%29% 28%
  18. 18. McKinsey & Company 18 Microaggressions can have a macro impact % of employees who say they experience microaggressions across all industries Being disrespected Having competence questioned Being overlooked Needing to provide more evidence of your competence Having your judgment questioned in your area of expertise Being interrupted or spoken over Hearing demeaning remarks about you or people like you Hearing other’s surprise at your language skills or other abilities Having others take or get credit for your ideas White women Latinas Black womenAll men Asian women 28 28 4014 30 39 31 4129 30 53 42 4334 43 15 16 1811 12 11 18 268 16 40 33 3527 34 Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research Men Women
  19. 19. McKinsey & Company 19 Women in the Media and Entertainment industry experience microaggressions slightly more than women in other industries Types of microaggressions 57 51 43 41 36 22 17 15 13 12 47 42 38 38 30 18 16 14 13 10 Having others take or get credit for your ideas Being mistaken for someone at a much lower level Being interrupted or spoken over Having others explain things to you that you already know Hearing others surprise at your language skills or other abilities Having your judgment questioned in your area of expertise Needing to provide more evidence of your competence than others do Hearing demeaning remarks about you or people like you Hearing insulting or disrespectful remarks about you Feeling you can't talk about yourself or your life outside work Media and entertainment All industries
  20. 20. McKinsey & Company 20 There are many kinds of “Onlys” and their workplace experiences are worse 2.5x more likely to need to provide more evidence of competence than others do 2x more likely to hear demeaning remarks 1.8x more likely have others take or get credit for their ideas 3.2x more likely to be mistaken for someone at a much lower level Onlys experience more microaggressions Onlys Non-Onlys Black women Women Lesbian women Latinas Asian women Only for sexual orientation Only for gender Only for race % of different groups of women who are often the only or one of only women in the room 18 54 70 37 35
  21. 21. McKinsey & Company 21 Employees and managers need to notice and challenge biased behavior Of the few who notice biased behavior, a minority object to it – unless they are already in a position of power % of employees who objected to bias, when they saw it 46% 53% 29% 32% 31% 34% Managers Senior leaders All employees 1 in 3 women 1 in 10 men notice biased behavior against women in the workplace Men Women Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research
  22. 22. McKinsey & Company 22McKinsey & Company 22 Commitment to diversity
  23. 23. 23 Commitment to gender diversity has increased significantly Companies and employees who say gender diversity is a high priority, % 1.In 2019, % of HR leaders who answered: How much of a priority is gender diversity for your company I A very important priority; In 2015, % of HR leaders who answered: Where does gender diversity rank on the CEO's strategic agenda? Top 3 Priority or Top 10 Priority. 2.Due to changes in data collection, in 2015 manager category combined Senior Manager/Director and Manager, whereas in 2019 managers category includes only Manager-level. Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research WomenCompanies 74 87 20151 20191 Companies overall +18% 44 61 2015 2019 Women overall +39% 2015 2019 33 51 Men overall +55% McKinsey & Company 23 Men
  24. 24. McKinsey & Company 24 Commitment to gender and diversity in Media and Entertainment is 6% higher than broader Corporate America 1.In 2019, % of HR leaders who answered: How much of a priority is gender diversity for your company I A very important priority. Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research All Companies 2019 Media and Entertainment 2019 Companies overall Women overallMen overall 201920191 93 87 61 51 2019 44 71 61 71 Companies and employees who say gender diversity is a high priority, %
  25. 25. McKinsey & Company 25 Across all industries, there is still room to drive commitment into action through all levels of the organization Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research Commitment to gender and racial diversity drops off from senior leaders to managers Gender diversity is a high priority to me Senior leaders Managers -19% Racial diversity is a high priority to me -13% The drop-off steepens when it comes to translating commitment into action Senior leaders Managers % who say they are actively working to improve diversity and inclusion -65% 73 59 68 59 46 16
  26. 26. McKinsey & Company 26 Taking action
  27. 27. McKinsey & Company 27 1. To help women advance to senior positions Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research Establish senior- sponsorship programs Create a commit to a culture of accountability by ensuring people at the top are held accountable for diversity & inclusion Ensure fair evaluations by establishing clear and objective evaluation criteria before the process begins Evaluate all candidates against criteria Sponsors and accountability CriteriaBoard positions Appoint more women to board positions Adding more women to the board can help ensure greater gender party as companies evaluate senior level candidates
  28. 28. McKinsey & Company 28 2. To help address culture issues Source: 2019 Women in the Workplace research Combat biases Establish a systematic training program to combat biases Offer unconscious bias training at important decision making junctures Listen Listen to senior women’s perspective learn from those that have successfully navigated obstacles throughout their career Enlist male allies Enlisting men as allies can help close the awareness gap in regards to noticing biased behaviors in the workplace
  29. 29. McKinsey & Company 29 Thank you Read the full report: www.womenintheworkplace.com Contact: workplace_survey@mckinsey.com
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New McKinsey research suggests women remain locked out of top roles in media and entertainment. A more diverse cast is required.

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