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Assessment: Putting Learning to Work

Professor Michele Pistone, Villanova University, shares her insights on assessment for legal education, including formative and summative assessment. She explains the difference between formative and summative assessments and the components of effective assessment tools. For more information about online learning, visit, Legaledweb.com and You tube/ LegalED.

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Assessment: Putting Learning to Work

  1. 1. ASSESSMENT Putting Learning to Work Professor Michele Pistone Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law @profpistone
  2. 2. Agenda • Top 5 tips for teaching law online • Student centered design • Student centered design & assessment • Summative assessments • Formative assessments • Performance-based assessments & rubrics • Discussion boards • Questions
  3. 3. Top5Tips forTeaching Law Online 1Shift your mindset Employ student-centered design Assess & measure student learning Use space & time differently Jump in, ask Qs & have fun! 2 3 4 5
  4. 4. Student-centered designcourse-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities assessment
  5. 5. Student-centered design:course-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities feedback & assessment Guiding Questions: What do you want students to: • know; • be able to do; & • value Start with your syllabus & course goals
  6. 6. Student-centered design:course-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities feedback & assessment • Textbook • Readings • Articles • Reports • Lectures • Videos • Podcasts Guiding Questions: How will the students gain knowledge? How will you/expert transfer knowledge to the students?
  7. 7. Student-centered designcourse-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities feedback & assessment • Exercises • Role plays • Discussion boards • Reflections • Small group work • Socratic dialogue Guiding Questions: How will the students engage with the learning content? How will the students put their learning to work?
  8. 8. Student-centered designcourse-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities feedback & assessment Guiding Questions: How will students demonstrate they met the learning goals? How will I assess/measure the student's work? Formative: • Quizzes • Discussion Boards • Exercises • Reflections • Rubrics • Supervision/O ffice hours • Rounds • Role plays Summative: • Hearing/adjudication • Reflections on learning – tied to learning goals • Capstone exercise • Portfolio
  9. 9. course-level learning goals unit-level learning goals learning content learning activities feedback & assessment Student-centered design & assessment • Assessment = Any learning activity that includes measurement of achievement by students of learning goals/knowledge, skills, values • Summative assessment of learning • Formative assessment as learning
  10. 10. When creating any assessment: • Start from course & unit learning goals • Determine evidence to demonstrate students met goals • Determine methods for generating evidence • Determine how to evaluate evidence • Build those insights into set of summative/formative assessments Examples of assessment strategies: • My entire course grade will be based on a single final exam • Half the course grade is based on a final exam, and the rest will be based on quizzes, written assignments, and class participation Student-centered design & assessment
  11. 11. • Assessment of learning • Usually leads to a grade or contribution towards a grade Examples: Summative assessment Final Exam Online Quiz Clinic Performance/Role Play/Student Presentation Other Examples: Papers and writing assignments, skills performance/role play (ex. negotiation), portfolios of work, etc.
  12. 12. • Assessment as learning • Designed to identify & close learning gaps in real time Examples: Formative assessment Socratic Questioning Ungraded Quiz/Poll Check for Understanding Online Discussion Other Examples: Classroom discussion, “Do Now” exercises, observed performance/behavior
  13. 13. • Linear/Closed response: includes machine-scored item types usually built into a learning management system (LMS) • Examples: Multiple-choice, matching, etc. • Linear/Open response: open-ended items with incorrect and correct answers • Examples: Fill-in-the-blank, short answer problems • Performance-based: students perform open-ended task involving integrating knowledge and/or demonstrating complex skills/values • Examples: Written final exam, research paper, student presentation, clinical evaluation Types of assessment content
  14. 14. • Assessment as learning • Strategically designed so students get feedback • Professors know who has and has not mastered a learning goal • Includes a remediation strategy that allows the professor to close gaps between those who have/have not mastered a learning goal in real time Examples: Socratic questioning, quizzes, guided discussions, contributions a discussion board Formative assessment
  15. 15. 1. A question or task that will elicit whether a students has mastered a learning goal 2. A remediation strategy for closing learning gaps in real time 3. Content for executing that remediation strategy “at-the-ready” 4. Integration of “assessment as learning” into the design of a lesson Formative assessment components
  16. 16. 1. A question or task that will elicit whether a students has mastered a learning goal: Multiple-choice question/poll question 2. A remediation strategy for closing learning gaps in real time: Direct instruction 3. Content for executing a remediation strategy “at-the-ready”: Slide providing simple explanations 4. Integration of “assessment as learning” into the design of a lesson: Lesson plan that would dive more deeply into each option, building on questions that arise from responses to the formative item Example
  17. 17. Performance-Based Assessments & Rubrics
  18. 18. 1. Start from learning goals and a list of evidence needed to determine if learning has taken place 2. Evidence becomes the basis for a set of evaluation criteria 3. Create a preliminary rubric that assigns criteria and performance levels based on evidence 4. Create an assignment and a rubric designed to evaluate that assignment in tandem (do not force fit a rubric to an existing assignment, or vice versa) 5. Work rubric criteria into your assignment instructions (or provide students the rubric) Performance-based assessments
  19. 19. Criterion Performance Levels Descriptors Rubric - Components
  20. 20. Rubric - Examples
  21. 21. Demo: Online Discussion Boards
  22. 22. Why use Discussion Boards? • Build community; • Foster in-depth reflection by giving students time to reflect on their thoughts and compose a thoughtful response; • Practice giving and receiving advice from colleagues; • Practice expressing and responding to the viewpoints of others; • Develop writing and critical thinking skills; • Share opinions and ideas with others and to see the world through the perspectives of others; and • Practice providing constructive criticism and sharing differing viewpoints.
  23. 23. https://youtu.be/Ped3m5zEBIU
  24. 24. Questions? Professor Michele Pistone Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law @profpistone

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