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Title Defance Presentation.pptx

  1. 1. Design and Optimization of Net Zero Energy Building NAME: ALI MUHAMMAD REG#: 3119999051 MAJOR: POWER ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING THERMOPHYSICS SUPERVISOR: HAIHU LIU
  2. 2. Self Introduction: MY SELF IS MUHAMMAD ALI AND I AM FROM LAHORE PAKISTAN FAMOUS FOR ITS HISTORICAL PLACES AND DELICIOUS COSINES. EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: MASTER STUDENT : XIAN JIAOTONG UNIVERSITY (CONT) BACHELORS: UNIVERSITY OF LAHORE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: • 2 YEAR AS MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR IN MANAMA PACKAGING INDUSTRY KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN • 1 YEAR AS HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY AT LAHORE POLY TECHNIQUE INSTITUTE LAHORE HOBBIES: • TRAVELLING AND TOURISM • PARTICIPATING IN SPORT ACTIVITIES
  3. 3. Introduction to topic: ZERO ENERGY BUILDING (ZEB): AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDING WHERE, ON A SOURCE ENERGY BASIS, THE ACTUAL ANNUAL DELIVERED ENERGY IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO THE ON-SITE RENEWABLE EXPORTED ENERGY. ACCORDING TO WORLD GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL: THE DEFINITION OF A NET ZERO CARBON BUILDING IS A BUILDING THAT IS HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT AND FULLY POWERED FROM ON-SITE AND/OR OFF-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES.
  4. 4. Energy Transfer in zero energy Building:
  5. 5. Motivation:  Energy consumption of residential and commercial buildings has increased between 20% and 40% in developed countries (Pérez-Lombard et al. 2008).  Energy use in residential buildings of different countries ranges between 16% and 50%, and the worldwide average energy consumption of the residential sector accounts for about 30% of the total energy usage (Meyers et al. 2003; Morelli 2001; Boardman 2004; Ueno et al. 2006; Araujo et al. 2001; Kamal 1997; Lenzena et al. 2006).  In China, it is estimated that buildings stocks will account for about 35% of total energy consumption in 2020, 65% of this being consumed by the heating, ventilation, and air- conditioning (HVAC) system (Lam et al. 2008).
  6. 6. Motivation:  The cooling consumption of residential buildings is influenced by many factors, including building envelope, building equipment, climate, and so on. Amongst these factors, the type of air-conditioning (AC) system plays an important role in the building consumption and system efficiency (Peng et al. 2012).  Buildings together contribute to over a third of world’s energy consumption and carbon emissions (Pan and Garmston, 2012).  Buildings in Hong Kong account for almost 92% of electricity use and 60% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the city (EMSD, 2014).
  7. 7. Problem Statement: The project is proposed to design and optimize Net Zero Energy Building in Lahore (Pakistan) at severe hot humid environment to reduce its energy demand for heating and cooling by using passive cooling techniques.to optimize building energy performance by reducing is running cost.
  8. 8. Literature Review:  Within an urbanizing environment where 66% of the world’s population is projected to be urban by 2050 [1].  the need to reduce global CO2 emissions is becoming apparent. Currently in the EU nearly 40% of final energy consumption and 36% of greenhouse gas emissions are attributed to buildings [2].  In China, it is estimated that buildings stocks will account for about 35% of total energy consumption in 2020, 65% of this being consumed by the heating, ventilation, and air- conditioning (HVAC) system.  In order to achieve the EU’s 2020 targets in the EPBD Directive, but also to meet the longer term objectives of the climate strategy of the low carbon economy roadmap 2050.[3]  optimized strategies in designing nearly Zero Energy Buildings (nZEBs) and high-rise nZEBs need to be developed. A zero energy building refers to a building that produces as much energy as it consumes in a defined period. [3].
  9. 9. Literature Review:  Aimed to minimize heating and cooling loads of an office space in Seoul using optimization driven by NSGA-II. The following parameters were investigated: floor area, building orientation, ceiling height, aspect ratio, plenum height, window-to-wall ratio, wall insulation, window insulation, and solar heat gain coefficient and air leakage.. [4]  Aim in the study of was to find the optimal solution for a residential building in Chongqing, China, with regards to energy consumption and indoor thermal comfort. The optimization was driven with NSGA-II and EnergyPlus was used for energy simulations. [5]
  10. 10.  Explored the trade-off between cost and carbon emissions, for the design of a modular hotel unit. An optimization was applied for various climate types. Investigated variables were envelope design parameters, different HVAC systems and energy generation from PV and solar thermal panels installed on the roof. [6]  The need of optimization for improving building and HVAC system performance was underlined by In his optimization for a school building in Trondheim, Norway he explored both passive and active design aspects. The later entailed night setback temperatures. [7] Review on optimization studies:
  11. 11. Review on ZEB strategies:  In 1996 Lysen [8] presented a stepped environmental design approach for energy called the Trias Energica. The 1st step aimed to prevent the use of energy. The 2nd step refers to using renewable energy sources as widely as possible. The last step relates to the remaining energy demand and entails using fossil fuels as efficiently and cleanly as possible [9].  Another stepped strategy is The New Stepped Strategy that eliminates the use of fossil fuels in exchange of the exploitation of waste flows [10]. The 1st step includes passive strategies such as shading or improved insulation of the building envelope. The 2nd step includes reusing and recycling waste flows, like exchanging heat between different buildings or functions.  The 3rd step refers to producing energy from active systems like PV panels or solar collectors. With regard to the Climate Responsive Design approach, according to Looman [12], the design should exploit natural energy sources like the sun, earth, wind, sky, water, complemented with energy recovery from waste flows. A combination of techniques will result into a low-energy, comfortable building.
  12. 12. Review on ZEB strategies:  The passive house strategy is based on the principles of reducing losses and optimizing passive solar gains, without the use of active systems [13]. The strategy refers to optimizing variables like the U value of external walls, roofs, shading surfaces, window area, etc individually, in a stepped approach [14].  This strategy suggests optimizing variables like window size, shading and thermal mass and others for maximizing thermal comfort. Optimizing the energy aspect includes optimizing wall U value, building orientation, infiltration, using natural ventilation and increasing daylight availability [14].
  13. 13. Objectives:  To determine the overall energy efficiency of building  To determine initial cooling and heating load of the building  Analysis of each component contributed in energy consumption  Applying passive cooling methods  Recalculation of energy performance of the building  Recommend an appropriate renewable energy source for the building
  14. 14. Methodology: The project is based upon simulation which consists of the following steps:  Study and analysis of initial energy performance of building by using simulation tools.  Study and analysis of present HVACR system in the building  Evaluate energy demand of the existing building.  Optimization of building performance by using passive cooling methods  Simulation of optimize building and compare results with previous simulation results.  Recommend an appropriate renewable energy source according to the annual energy demand of building.
  15. 15. Project Flow Chart:
  16. 16. Simulation Tools  Design Builder  Autodesk Revit 2019  Autodesk AutoCAD 2018  Energy Plus  Carrier HAP
  17. 17. References: [1]. United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (2014). World Urbanization Prospects the 2014 Revision Highlights.New York: United Nations, pp.7-10. [2]. Berardi, U. (2017). A cross-country comparison of the building energy consumptions and their trends. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 123, pp.230-241. [3].Lam JC, Wan KKW, Tsang CL, Yang L (2008). Building energy efficiency in different climates. Energy Conversion and Management, 49: 2354–2366. [4]. Lysen, E.H. (1996). The Trias Energica: Solar Energy Strategies for Developing Countries. In: Proceedings of the Eurosun Conference. Freiburg. September 16-19. pp. 1-6. [5]. Xu, J., Kim, J., Hong, H. and Koo, J. (2015). A systematic approach for energy efficient building design factors optimization. Energy and Buildings, 89, pp.87-96. [6]. Yu, W., Li, B., Jia, H., Zhang, M. and Wang, D. (2015). Application of multiobjective genetic algorithm to optimize energy efficiency and thermal comfort in building design. Energy and Buildings, 88, pp.135-143.
  18. 18. References: [7]. Evins, R., Pointer, P. and Burgess, S. (2012). Multi-objective optimisation of a modular building for different climate types. In: First Building Simulation and Optimization Conference. UK, pp.173-180. [8]. Holst, J. (2003). Using whole building simulation models and optimizing procedures to optimize building envelope design with respect to energy consumption and indoor environment. In: Eighth International IBPSA Conference. Netherlands, pp.507-514. [9]. Lysen, E.H. (1996). The Trias Energica: Solar Energy Strategies for Developing Countries. In: Proceedings of the Eurosun Conference. Freiburg. September 16-19. pp. 1-6. [10]. Konstantinou, T. (2014).Facade Refurbishment Toolbox, Supporting the design of residential energy upgrades. Ph. D Thesis. Delft University of Technology. [11]. Looman, R. (2017). Climate-responsive design, a framework for an energy concept design- decision support tool for architects using principles of climateresponsive design. Ph. D. Thesis. Delft University of Technology. [12]. Pfluger, R., Feist, W., Ludwig, S. and Otte, J. (2007). Nutzerhandbuch für den Geschoßwohungsbau in PassivhausStandard. [ebook] German Federal Office for Building and Regional Planning, p.11 [13]. Pfluger, R. (2007). Simulation des thermischen Gebäudeverhaltens eines Passivhauses in GeschoßwohnungsbauTypologie und städtischer Bebauung. Darmstadt: PHI Passivhaus-Institut, pp.3- 31. [14]. Active House Alliance (2015). ACTIVE HOUSE - the guidelines. Bruxelles: Active House, pp.8-62.

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