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NCVO Webinar: Board Leadership: Supporting your charity through the next phase of the pandemic

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NCVO Webinar: Board Leadership: Supporting your charity through the next phase of the pandemic

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Slides of the NCVO webinar that took place in June 2020 covering:
1) the role of the chair and the board in supporting organisations in the next phase
2) challenges and opportunities which the easing of lockdown presents for trustees
3) tips and resources to help boards plan in a period of significant change

Watch the webinar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaPktkiCRgo

Slides of the NCVO webinar that took place in June 2020 covering:
1) the role of the chair and the board in supporting organisations in the next phase
2) challenges and opportunities which the easing of lockdown presents for trustees
3) tips and resources to help boards plan in a period of significant change

Watch the webinar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaPktkiCRgo

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NCVO Webinar: Board Leadership: Supporting your charity through the next phase of the pandemic

  1. 1. BOARD LEADERSHIP: SUPPORTING YOUR CHARITY THROUGH THE NEXT PHASE OF THE PANDEMIC JUNE 2020
  2. 2. Ros Oakley Dan Francis Josie Hinton 2
  3. 3. • The role of the chair and the board in supporting organisations in the next phase • Challenges and opportunities which the easing of lockdown presents for trustees • Tips and resources to help boards plan in a period of significant change. WHAT WE WILL COVER
  4. 4. THE ROLE OF THE CHAIR AND BOARD
  5. 5. Poll What best describes your situation? A. In short term financial distress – services reduced or stopped B. In short term financial distress – services continuing or increased C. Short term finances OK – services reduced or stopped D. Short term finances OK – services continuing or increased E. Limited or no change – services remain unaffected
  6. 6. WE ARE NOT ALL IN THE SAME BOAT, BUT WE ARE IN THE SAME STORM
  7. 7. WHAT IS THE BOARD’S PLACE IN THE BOAT? • Bailing? • Rowing/in the engine room? • In the map-room? • In the eagle’s nest? • At the helm? • Adjusting course? • Setting new direction?
  8. 8. Poll What best describes your focus? A. Bailing – all hands on deck to survive B. Rowing/in the engine room – some additional involvement to add more capacity C. At the helm – perhaps CEO furloughed? D. Getting our bearings E. Setting a new direction
  9. 9. CORONAVIRUS CRISIS-IMPACT ON BOARDS AND BOARD BEHAVIOUR 1. Personal impact 2. Disorientation, loss of focus 3. Need for faster decision-making 4. Change in information needs 5. Differing attitudes to risk
  10. 10. CORONAVIRUS CRISIS-IMPACT ON BOARDS AND BOARD BEHAVIOUR 6. Emergence of new priorities 7. Change in board engagement 8. Changing relationship with staff esp. CEO 9. Changes in board dynamics 10. Loss of direction/momentum
  11. 11. MOVING THE BOARD TO THE NEXT STAGE 1. Show emotional intelligence 2. Help the board adjust mode 3. Focus on those you serve- purpose first 4. Be strategic 5. Look for paradigm shifts 6. Decide and adjust 7. Give your CEO and team space and support 8. Attend to good governance essentials
  12. 12. RELEVANT AOC RESOURCES Coronavirus related online events on: Personal resilience; Chair’s role post pandemic; Return to work; staff restructuring and redundancies Written resources: Working with trustees series: Working 1:1, Working as a team; Working through difficult board relationships
  13. 13. IDENTIFYING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  14. 14. ‘Employee directives to work from home. Travel bans. Conferences postponed, cancelled or taken virtual. Self-quarantines. Social distancing. Stockpiling supplies. If ever the phrase ‘VUCA’ felt appropriate to use, it’s now.’ Forbes Magazine 2020
  15. 15. DEFINING THE TERM ‘We now live in a ‘VUCA world.’ Acronym for: Volatile: Events happening outside your control Uncertain: An unclear and unpredictable future Complex: Dynamic environment, interconnected parts, confusing and conflicting information Ambiguous: A lack of certainty of causality and the outcome • Intended to reflect forces of change that affect organisations • Informs leadership skills, approaches and behaviours for different scenarios
  16. 16. ‘VUCA has become a cute, trendy way of saying ‘unpredictable change’.’ Bennett and Lemoine 2014
  17. 17. Based on: Bennett and Lemoine, Harvard Business Review 2014 Complexity Lots of information, interconnected and dependent parts. Approach: Restructure or bring on specialists, build up resources to address complexity. Volatility Unexpected or unstable. Challenge possibly for unknown duration. Not always hard to understand. Approach: Build capability to be flexible, devote resources to preparedness. Ambiguity Causal relationships are unclear. Very little precedents exist. Unknown, Unknowns! Approach: Experiment to build understanding of cause and effect. Uncertainty Basic cause and effect are known. Change is likely but not certain. Approach: Invest in information and building understanding. Howwellcanyoupredicttheresultofyouractions? How much do you know about the situation?
  18. 18. WHAT DOES VUCA MEAN FOR YOU? 1. Capitalising on opportunity requires understanding the changes and what they mean for your organisation and context. 2. Each VUCA terms means different things and requires different leadership approaches. 3. Lumping them together ‘we live in a VUCA world’ can lead to an absence of planning. Volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity all require their own separate responses.
  19. 19. IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES OF UNCERTAINTY • The components of VUCA often present in combination • Carefully diagnose and label a situation for what it is based on your context and situation Scenario 1 An advice service charity which offers face to face support to vulnerable users is not able to deliver services in person. Assessmen t Volatility: This has happened quickly meaning users are not getting advice, may end up in a position of crisis and it is unclear how long it will last. Ambiguous: There is no evidence to suggest alternative services will be taken up, or that users would have the means to access them. It’s unclear how long the pandemic will last and how long before the office can reopen. Response Build slack and plan for preparedness: Review your reserves policy, protect sustainable income sources and speak with funders about longer term support. Consider investing in the skills or tools you will need to deliver services differently in the long term. Experiment: Trial some different approaches to delivering advice in different ways.
  20. 20. IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES OF UNCERTAINTY Scenario 2 A national charity who cannot run major events which generate all their income wants to change business model to seek grant funding to cover core costs and charge less for remote events. Assessmen t Complexity: The grant funding world is very different from the charity’s current operating model. It involves lots of interconnected relationships with funders which the charity doesn’t understand. Different funders have different priorities and restrictions. Funding bids need to be tailored. Uncertain: Although the charity are clear that if they received grant funding they would be more sustainable (cause and effect). They are not yet clear on if their work is fundable or even which funders would be interested. Response Restructure and invest in specialists: Review your current structure to reflect that of an organisation focused on attracting grant rather than commercial income. Employ grant funding specialists or bring on a new trustee with this experience. Research: Undertake a project to understand the funding environment, join networks and establish relationships.
  21. 21. Source: Bennett and Lemoine, Harvard Business Review 2014 Poll: If you had to choose one, which of VUCA best describes the context and environment for your charity and its services? B AC D
  22. 22. USING VUCA IN BOARD PLANNING Five steps for responding to the VUCA environment: 1. Brainstorm the challenges and changes which Coronavirus has presented. 2. Diagnose if the situation you are in is the result of: Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity or a combination. 3. Consider what kind of leadership and governance responses are required as a result. 4. Overlay your objectives and values to tailor the response. 5. Consider the value in scenario planning in helping to decide a course of action and identify potential opportunities.
  23. 23. Poll: Have you undertaken any scenario planning on multiple potential options for decisions as a result of coronavirus? A. Yes B. No
  24. 24. SCENARIO PLANNING Once you have assessed your environment it can be helpful to plan various responses. Scenario planning is making assumptions on what the future is going to be and how your operating environment will change overtime. It is impossible to be certain but mapping various scenarios can help plan for different outcomes. Scenario planning steps: 1. Mapping the environment 2. Identifying scenarios 3. Developing plans and continually reviewing Important considerations • Use of evidence • Complexity • Who to involve • The human element • Risk management
  25. 25. QUESTIONS 25
  26. 26. THANK YOU Dan.francis@ncvo.org.uk @mynameisdanfran LinkedIn Josie.Hinton@ncvo.org.uk LinkedIn Ros.Oakley@AssociationofChairs.org.uk @RosOakley LinkedIn26

Notas del editor

  • Josie to make introductons
  • Josie to outline these key areas and make clear we have plenty of time for Q&A at the end.
  • What you need to do next depends on your situation and what phase you are actually in
    Those of us who are still delivering services – particularly if in a different way or at a much higher level will have been operating at full tilt, with little time to stop and think beyond the short term.
    If you have short term financial difficulties, you have an added level of pressure. An indeed your finances may have prevented you from operating
    For those of you who have reduced or stopped your services partly or wholly, you are more likely to have had time to think but you may have key staff furloughed, shielded, ill or worse. And you are faced with a large amount of uncertainty.
    These different situations will put you in very different places. And of course they’ll be overlaid by differing personal circumstances for trustees and staff.
  • Photo source: https://freesvg.org/boats-in-the-storm
    Not sure who to attribute the quote to. Possibly Bono!

    Make the point that they may be small or large, with lots of crew or very few, basic equipment or advanced. So that will affect how they respond.
  • At the moment many board members are finding themselves in role they do not normally undertake.

    And that may be necessary at the moment, but can’t go on forever. Critically capacity much be found to set direction- and that’s the natural domain of the board.
  • Important to understand where you currently are – and to make sure you readjust to ensure the vital strategic work of the board is carried out. It’s your responsibility and where you can add most value.

    But before you do that it’s worth reflecting not just on the role the Board is playing, but other ways in which board behaviour has been affected. And how you navigate this new environment.
  • This is relevant to all – to staff trying to support their boards, to trustees trying to navigate the new territory and especially for Chairs about how to help their board add most value at this time.
  • This is relevant to all – to staff trying to support their boards, to trustees trying to navigate the new territory and especially for Chairs about how to help their board add most value at this time.
  • Josie to outline these key areas and make clear we have plenty of time for Q&A at the end.
  • Dan:

    Highlight that the commission has published specific guidance on managing at this time, covering a whole range of areas. In general their guidance is supplementary to existing guidance – but there are some specific changes in areas such as: Meeting remotely and insolvency

    We are going to look at 3 key areas:
    Adapting your objects
    SiR
    Finance and financial difficulty


    Objects – a charity is restricted in the work it can do, and the powers it has by its objects. However the charity commission recognise that at this time, there will be lots of trustees who see their objects as restrictive – in helping support the Covid19 crisis. As such they have develop guidance on how to be flexible.

    Objects that might already allow you to offer support include:
    the relief of poverty
    the relief of need hardship or distress
    the relief of the elderly
    the advancement of education or advancement in life of young people
    the advancement of health

    These are where supporting the effort is most obviously in line with your purpose. But trustees still need to be aware of other restrictions such as: who they can help or where they can help

    The commission encourages charities with other objectives – to consider how they can help in less direct ways which are still inline with their purposes. The example of an arts organisation offering free online classes to relive boredom and isolation.
  • Josie to outline these key areas and make clear we have plenty of time for Q&A at the end.
  • If VUCA is seen as general, unavoidable, and unsolvable, leaders will take no action and fail to solve an actual problem.

    Alternatively, if leaders misread the environment and prepare for the wrong challenge, they will misdirect resources and fail to address the actual problem.
  • If VUCA is seen as general, unavoidable, and unsolvable, leaders will take no action and fail to solve an actual problem.

    Alternatively, if leaders misread the environment and prepare for the wrong challenge, they will misdirect resources and fail to address the actual problem.
  • If VUCA is seen as general, unavoidable, and unsolvable, leaders will take no action and fail to solve an actual problem.

    Alternatively, if leaders misread the environment and prepare for the wrong challenge, they will misdirect resources and fail to address the actual problem.
  • .
  • The board must do this in partnership with the executive
  • Josie to field questions
    Send email with useful links and guidance.

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