Mobile Armor and the Internet of Things

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In 2016, it is predicted there will be more than 6.4 billion connected “things” and as our world becomes more connected through the Internet of Things (IoT), the smartphone’s power – and associated privacy and security risks – increases. In an effort to better understand consumers’ level of awareness and concern, Norton surveyed 5,000 consumers around the globe (US, UK, Australia, Japan and Canada) to gauge their perceptions of mobile app risks in the IoT landscape.

One half of respondents feel insecure using app-controlled home entry and a quarter are uncertain.

Despite the overall fear and uncertainty around IoT –on average, over half of respondents still use at least one mobile app to manage or control their connected devices.

Only 6% would be concerned if their home security or alarms were hacked.

Read through the results of the survey for more insights into the Internet of Things.

Publicado en: Móvil, Internet, Tecnología
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Mobile Armor and the Internet of Things

  1. 1. 1 Mobile Armor and the "Internet of Things” Omnibus Survey Results Markets: US, UK, Australia, Japan and Canada
  2. 2. Our smartphones are, in many ways, a command center – providing access to new information and digital experiences, while also managing our digital lives with health and fitness trackers, home security and thermostat systems, and so on. With these capabilities comes great power. Every day, the average smartphone emits 5,500 beacons, that is, radio signals sent via Bluetooth transmitter, trying to communicate with other receptive devices. In 2016, it is predicted there will be more than 6.4 billion connected “things” and as our world becomes more connected through the Internet of Things (IoT), the smartphone’s power – and associated privacy and security risks – increases. In an effort to better understand consumers’ level of awareness and concern, Norton surveyed 5,000 consumers around the globe (US, UK, Australia, Japan and Canada) to gauge their perceptions of mobile app risks in the IoT landscape. 2
  3. 3. Methodology USA UK AUSTRALIA JAPAN CANADA N=1,007 MOE=+/- 3.09% N=1,000 MOE=+/- 3.1% N=1,031 MOE=+/- 3.05% N=1,016 MOE=+/- 3.07% N=1,007 MOE=+/- 3.09% 3 • Methodology: Online, omnibus survey • Markets: US, UK, Australia, Japan and Canada • Target Audience: Gen Pop (Adults, 18+) • Globally, we also looked specifically at people who use personal finance / banking apps; n = 1,985, [MOE = +/- 2.1%] • # of Interviews: ~n=1,000 per market • Fieldwork Dates: February 4th–8th, 2016
  4. 4. 4 Despite major data breaches, there still appears to be a lack of understanding of the risks surrounding the security risks of IoT devices and mobile apps… 91% of respondents say they would be upset if a stranger accessed information / apps they use to control connected devices on their mobile phone… …meaning a surprising 9% of respondents wouldn’t be upset if a stranger accessed their personal information. The stakes are higher among those already engaged with the category; particularly those who use an app to control their personal finances/banking (98% would be upset) Q2: Imagine the possibility of someone hacking into your mobile phone remotely. Which of the following would you be most upset about a stranger accessing on your mobile phone? Please select just one.
  5. 5. Q3: Imagine you had the ability to control your home entry system from your smartphone, so that instead of manually opening a door, you could just tap an app and open the door remotely for friends and family (or even a dog walker) while across the country or in an important work meeting. Would you feel secure activating the app and unlocking your home door remotely? 5 One half of respondents feel insecure using app-controlled home entry and a quarter are uncertain. Of those who feel secure, they tend to be younger, skew male and are more likely to use mobile apps to manage their connected devices. 70% 56% 47% 46% 45% 38% 18% 22% 25% 24% 18% 23% 12% 23% 28% 30% 37% 39% Yes – I would feel secureNo – I would feel insecure Don’t Know Global Average SECURE: 26% Global Average INSECURE: 52% App-Activated Home Entry – Security Perceptions Showing % Selecting Each $ Those who feel secure… • Skew younger • Are slightly more likely to be male • And are more likely to use mobile apps to manage connected devices
  6. 6. Despite the overall fear and uncertainty around IoT – on average, over half of respondents still use at least one mobile app to manage or control their connected devices. 6 Usage of Mobile Apps to Control Connected Devices Showing % that use at least one 63% 60% 60% 53% 42% … use at least one mobile app to control connected devices Q1: Do you currently use a mobile app to manage any of the following? Please select all that apply. 56% on average
  7. 7. 39% 26% 23% 20% 36% 21% 17% 14% 48% 26% 21% 19% 28% 15% 7% 12% 45% 28% 18% 18% Personal finance / banking Home entertainment Fitness tracker / smart watch Car* US UK Australia Japan Canada Q1: Do you currently use a mobile app to manage any of the following? Please select all that apply. Usage of Mobile Apps to Control Connected Devices Showing Top 4 Mobile Apps / Ranked by Average Usage 7 With the banking and finance industry embracing online transactions and money management, consumers are capitalizing on using mobile apps to manage and control their personal finances… *Internet access, remote start, music streaming, Bluetooth, GPS, etc. Most Utilized: 39% 23% 17% 17% AVG AVG AVG AVG
  8. 8. Q2: Imagine the possibility of someone hacking into your mobile phone remotely. Which of the following would you be most upset about a stranger accessing on your mobile phone? Please select just one. 8 Information / Connected Device People Would Be Most Upset About If Hacked Among Total / Showing % Selecting Each …even though over half of respondents said they would be upset if their personal financial information had been stolen or comprised. Compared that to only 6% who would be concerned if their home security or alarms were hacked. Information Type: Financial / banking information 54% 52% 61% 56% 59% Contact information, text and voice messages 13% 13% 13% 13% 11% Pictures and videos 10% 15% 10% 10% 10% Home security cameras / alarms controlled by a mobile app 6% 4% 4% 6% 6% Baby monitor/children’s wireless-enabled toys controlled by a mobile app 3% 3% 2% 1% 3% Home appliances / home entertainment controlled by a mobile app 3% 2% 1% 2% 1% Health + location information accessed through fitness tracker/smart watch app 2% 3% 2% 3% 1% I wouldn’t be upset if any of the above were hacked 9% 9% 7% 10% 8% 56% 67% AVG: $
  9. 9. 9 Although the number of connected home solutions coming to market continues to grow, the adoption of these devices is limited. While 23 percent control their home entertainment devices with a mobile phone, only 16 percent have connected home security cameras, alarms or entry systems, baby monitors, light bulbs and switches, or appliances. Usage of Mobile Apps to Control Home Connected Devices Showing % Selecting Each Q1: Do you currently use a mobile app to manage any of the following? Please select all that apply. Usage of mobile apps to control… Home Entertainment Connected Devices NON-Home Entertainment, Connected Devices* GAP 26% 14% 12 28% 19% 9 21% 14% 7 26% 23% 3 15% 13% 2 This includes: • Home security cameras/alarms • Light bulbs / light switches • Smart home appliance • Home entry system • Baby monitor
  10. 10. 48% 48% 44% 40% 38% 52% 52% 56% 60% 62% Q4: Would you feel more comfortable using a mobile app to control your home entry system, or your personal finance / banking? 10 Comfort With Mobile App Control For… Among Total / Showing % Selecting Each Home Entry System Personal Finance / Banking While banking and financial apps have been around for some time, consumers are just as uncertain about the security of these apps (56%) as they are for apps controlling new and emerging IoT home entry systems (44 %). People engaged in the category are more comfortable with personal finance/banking (65%) Average 44% $ 27% Average 56% $ 73%
  11. 11. Unfortunately, our apps are not always trustworthy, creating complications for the IoT ecosystem 11 Norton Mobile Insight, a proprietary app-scanning technology, tracks for intrusive or privacy-infringing* behaviors. By the numbers: • In the last year, Norton scanned over 90 app databases and 25 million apps • Over 60 percent – or 16 million – of the samples we’ve scanned are considered malicious • The highest offending categories for greyware, or apps displaying privacy/intrusive behaviors include: games, followed by entertainment and photos and video apps *Privacy infringing behaviors include sending personally identifiable information like device and account information (account and device information, browser history, location, call logs) off the device without encryption. Intrusive behavior examples would be adding browser favorites, putting up big banner ads, or changing desktop images or ringtones.
  12. 12. Consumers can protect themselves by: • Using a reputable mobile security app that scans apps and identifies potential vulnerabilities before downloading an app. • Being aware of IoT devices rushed to market. They could have unaddressed security vulnerabilities. • Keeping in mind that third-party app stores may not put apps through as much rigor as the official apps stores such as the Google Play Store or Apple’s App Store. • Watching out for apps that ask you to disable settings that protect you from installing unsecure apps • Making sure you install the latest updates on your IoT device, whether automatically or when sent from the manufacturer 12

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