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  1. 1. ณัฐพล เอี่ยมวงศ์ศานติ์ WWW.CIVICMEDIA.COM
  2. 2. Video interface Digital Video  HDMI  DVI  IEEE 1934  SPDIF (audio)  SDI Analog Video  Composite video  S-video  Component video
  3. 3. Analog Video  Composite video (CVBS)  S-video (Y/C)  Component video Composite video is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. It is usually in a standard format such as NTSC, PAL, or SECAM. It is a composite of three source signals called Y, U and V (together referred to as YUV) with sync pulses.
  4. 4. Separate video, abbreviated S-Video and also known as Y/C (or erroneously, S-VHS and "super video") is an analog video signal that carries the video data as two separate signals (brightness and color), unlike composite video which carries the entire set of signals in one signal line. S-Video, as most commonly implemented, carries high-bandwidth 480i or 576i resolution video, i.e. standard definition video. It does not carry audio on the same cable. Analog Video  Composite video (CVBS)  S-video (Y/C)  Component video S-Video (S for Separate) is another type of component video signal (transferring Y'UV when used for PAL video and Y'IQ when used for NTSC video), because the luma (Y') and chroma (UV or IQ) signals are transmitted on separate wires. This connection type, however, cannot produce high definition pictures with more than 480 interlaced lines of video for NTSC or more than 576 lines of interlaced video for PAL.
  5. 5. Analog Video  Composite video (CVBS)  S-video (Y/C)  Component video Component video is a video signal that has been split into two or more components. In popular use, it refers to a type of analog video information that is transmitted or stored as three separate signals. Component video can be contrasted with composite video (such as NTSC or PAL) in which all the video information is combined into a single line level signal. Increasingly, analog component video connections are being superseded by digital component video connections based on the DVI and HDMI standards. Y'PbPr Analog Component Video RGB Analog Component Video
  6. 6. RGB Analog Component Video The various RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analogue component video standards (e.g. RGBS, RGBHV) typically offer the best analogue video signals available in consumer electronics. RGB uses no compression and offers no real limit in color depth or resolution. Most modern computers offer this signal via the VGA port. Many televisions, especially in Europe and Japan, utilize RGB via the SCART connector. All arcade games, excepting early vector and black and white games, use RGB monitors.  composite sync, where the horizontal and vertical signals are on one wire (RGBS)  separate sync, where the horizontal and vertical are on one wire each (RGBHV)  sync on green, where a composite sync signal is overlayed on the green wire (SoG or RGsB) Analog Video  Composite video (CVBS)  S-video (Y/C)  Component video
  7. 7. Y'PbPr or Y‘CbCr Analog Component Video Further types of component analogue video signals do not use R,G,B components but rather a colorless component, termed luma, combined with one or more color- carrying components, termed chroma, that give only color information. Both the S- Video component video output (two separate signals) and the Y'PbPr component video output (three separate signals) seen on DVD players are examples of this method. Analog Video  Composite video (CVBS)  S-video (Y/C)  Component video
  8. 8. Digital Video  HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface)  DVI (Digital Video Interface)  IEEE 1934 (FireWire)  SPDIF (Sony Philips Digital Interface)  SDI The High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) is an all-digital audio/video interface capable of transmitting uncompressed streams. HDMI is compatible with HDCP Digital Rights Management technology. HDMI provides an interface between any compatible digital audio/video source, such as a set-top box, a DVD player, a PC, a video game system, or an AV receiver and a compatible digital audio and/or video monitor, such as a digital television (DTV).
  9. 9. Digital Visual Interface (DVI) is a video interface standard designed to maximize the visual quality of digital display devices such as flat panel LCD computer displays and digital projectors. It was developed by an industry consortium, the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). It is designed primarily for carrying uncompressed digital video data to a display. It is partially compatible with the HDMI standard. Digital Video  HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface)  DVI (Digital Video Interface)  IEEE 1934 (FireWire)  SPDIF (Sony Philips Digital Interface)  SDI
  10. 10. Digital Video  HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface)  DVI (Digital Video Interface)  IEEE 1934 (FireWire)  SPDIF (Sony Philips Digital Interface)  SDI FireWire is Apple Inc.'s proprietary name for the IEEE 1394 interface (and also in the UK a colloquial industrial term for 'LHDC' (linear heat detecting cable) used in high integrity fire detection systems). It is also known as i.Link (Sony’s name) or IEEE 1394 (although the 1394 standard also defines a backplane interface). It is a personal computer (and digital audio/digital video) serial bus interface standard, offering high- speed communications and isochronous real-time data services. FireWire has replaced Parallel SCSI in many applications due to lower implementation costs and a simplified, more adaptable cabling system. IEEE 1394 has been adopted as the High Definition Audio-Video Network Alliance (HANA) standard connection interface for A/V component communication and control[citation needed]. FireWire is also available in wireless, Fiber optic and coaxial versions using the isochronous protocols.
  11. 11. S/PDIF is a collection of hardware and low-level protocol specifications for carrying digital audio signals between devices and stereo components. The name stands for Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format, the two companies being the primary designers of the S/PDIF format. It is more recently part of a larger collection of standards IEC-60958 (often referred to as AES/EBU), where it is known as IEC-958 type II. S/PDIF is essentially a minor modification of the original AES/EBU standard for consumer use, providing small differences in the protocol and requiring less expensive hardware. Digital Video  HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface)  DVI (Digital Video Interface)  IEEE 1934 (FireWire)  SPDIF (Sony Philips Digital Interface) (audio only)  SDI
  12. 12. The Serial Digital Interface (SDI), standardized in ITU-R BT.656 and SMPTE 259M, is a digital video interface used for broadcast-grade video. A related standard, known as High Definition Serial Digital Interface (HD-SDI), is standardized in SMPTE 292M; this provides a nominal data rate of 1.485 Gbit/s. Digital Video  HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface)  DVI (Digital Video Interface)  IEEE 1934 (FireWire)  SPDIF (Sony Philips Digital Interface)  SDI Standard Name Bitrates Example Video Formats SMPTE 259M SD-SDI 270 Mbit/s, 360 Mbit/s, 143 Mbit/s, and 177 Mbit/s 480i, 576i SMPTE 344M 540 Mbit/s 480p, 576p SMPTE 292M HD-SDI 1.485 Gbit/s, and 1.485/1.001 Gbit/s 720p, 1080i SMPTE 372M Dual Link HD-SDI 2.970 Gbit/s, and 2.970/1.001 Gbit/s 1080p SMPTE 424M 3G-SDI 2.970 Gbit/s, and 2.970/1.001 Gbit/s 1080p
  13. 13. Video Definition standard Computer Standard QVGA , VGA , SVGA , XGA , XGA+ , SXGA , SXGA+ , UXGA , QXGA , QSXGA , QUXGA , HXGA , HSXGA , HUXGA Television standard NTSC , PAL , SECAM , 576i , 576p , 720p , 1080p , 1080i
  14. 14. Designation Usage examples Definition (lines) Rate (Hz) Interlaced (fields) Progressive (frames) Low; MP@LL LDTV, VCD 240; 288 (SIF) 24, 30; 25 Standard; MP@ML SDTV, SVCD, DVD, DV 480 (NTSC, PAL-M) 60 24, 30 576 (PAL, SECAM) 50 25 Enhanced EDTV 480; 576 60; 50 High; MP@HL HDTV, HD DVD, Blu-ray Disc, HDV 720 24, 30, 60; 25, 50 1080 50, 60 24, 30; 25 Television standard NTSC , PAL , SECAM , 576i , 576p , 720p , 1080p , 1080i
  15. 15. Computer Standard VGA Video Graphics Array 640×480 640×350 320×200 720×400 (text) 4:3 64:35 16:10 9:5 4 bpp 4 bpp 4/8 bpp 4 bpp SVGA Super VGA 800×600 4:3 4 bpp XGA Extended Graphics Array 1024×768 640×480 4:3 4:3 8 bpp 16 bpp QVGA Quarter VGA 320×240 4:3 QQVGA Quarter QVGA 160×120 4:3 WXGA Widescreen Extended Graphics Array 1280×720 or 1280x800 16:9 or 16:10 32 bpp SXGA Super XGA 1280×1024 5:4 32 bpp WSXGA, or WXGA+ Widescreen Extended Graphics Array PLUS 1440×900 16:10 32 bpp UXGA Ultra XGA 1600×1200 4:3 32 bpp WUXGA Widescreen Ultra Extended Graphics Array 1920×1200 16:10 32 bpp
  16. 16. Composite video (CVBS) S-video (Y/C) Y'PbPr Component Video RGB Analog Video Maximum Resolution 576i (768 x 576) 576i (768 x 576) 720p (1280 x 720) 1600 x 1200 +
  17. 17. Maximum Resolution 2560 × 1600 2560 × 1600 HD-SDI 1080i (1920 x 1080) 3G-SDI 1080P (1920 x 1080)

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