Mining Engineering in Australia establishing and sustaining education and research excellence 
Professor Peter Dowd 
Execu...
Outline 
The Australian economy and the central role of mining. 
Mining Engineering education 
Degree programme and emp...
THE AUSTRALIAN CONTEXT: THE ECONOMY AND THE CENTRAL ROLE OF MINING
The Australian context 
The national economy 
1992 – 2012 economy grew at average annual rate of 3.2% per annum – signific...
The Australian context 
The national economy 
Strong emphasis on exporting commodities – especially mineral and energy res...
0.0% 
10.0% 
20.0% 
30.0% 
40.0% 
50.0% 
60.0% 
70.0% 
$0 
$20,000,000,000 
$40,000,000,000 
$60,000,000,000 
$80,000,000,...
MCA represents Australia’s exploration, mining and minerals processing industry, nationally and internationally, in its co...
MCA Membership 
52 member companies (mining and mining services companies) and 44 associate member companies. 
Member comp...
MINING ENGINEERING EDUCATION 
Programmes, graduates and employability
Tertiary engineering education in Australia 
All accredited professional Engineering programmes are normally of four years...
2011 Graduates 
AGRICULTURE 
ARCHITECTURE 
BUILDING 
URBAN PLANNING 
HUMANITIES 
LANGUAGES 
VISUAL/PERFORM. ARTS 
SOCIAL S...
In full-time employment 
Seeking full-time employment, not working 
Seeking full-time employment, working part-time 
Total...
THE DEMAND AND SUPPLY PROBLEM 
Graduate demand and supply
Cyclical nature of mining engineering graduate numbers: 
•Long-term characteristic since the 1960s. 
•International phenom...
Australia: Terms of trade and GDP growth 
Source: HSBC Economic Report 2012 
Recessions
300 
200 
100 
69 
74 
79 
84 
89 
94 
99 
04 
09 
14 
Number of graduates 
Year 
Lagged supply response to industry booms...
Private mining capital expenditure $M) 
Mining Engineering graduates 
0 
1000 
2000 
3000 
4000 
5000 
6000 
0 
20 
40 
60...
Supply of Mining Engineers 
Source: NRSET; MTEC
University constraints 
Economic viability of degree programmes and courses: 
–four-year Bachelor of Engineering programm...
Difficult to maintain research performance with loss of staff: 
•Disciplines within universities are assessed on their con...
•Large numbers of students enter Mining Engineering degree programmes when jobs are plentiful (boom times). 
•Mining Engin...
In worst case, when economic cycle improves: 
Insufficient schools; or 
For some disciplines (e.g., Mineral Processing),...
THE SOLUTION 
Sustainable delivery of Mining Engineering education and research
1996 
The Minerals Council of Australia established the National Tertiary Education Taskforce to identify specific steps f...
1999 Minerals Council of Australia established Minerals Tertiary Education Council (MTEC) to build a world-class tertiary ...
Through its university partners, MTEC currently supports and runs a range of educational programmes in the Australian mine...
MINING EDUCATION AUSTRALIA
The Australian tertiary Mining Engineering sector 
39 universities of which 32 offer Engineering programmes. Eight univers...
University of Queensland 
University of 
New South Wales 
University of Adelaide 
Curtin University 
Kalgoorlie 
MEA unive...
MEA 
MEA is an unincorporated joint venture, fostered and financially supported by the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA)...
MEA Objectives 
Establish and conduct a national, collaborative mining education programme for Australia; 
Rationalise a...
Attract and develop high-quality students and researchers into the field of mining engineering; 
Produce high-quality gr...
An economically and academically sustainable environment for mining engineering 
High-quality teaching: 
A national curr...
Governing Board 
Executive Director and MEA Executive 
Programme Leaders Committee 
Academic staff from Member Universitie...
MEA Governing Board 
The Governing Board oversees the direction and operation of MEA. In particular, it: 
sets the strate...
The Governing Board is constituted as: 
a person appointed by the University of Adelaide; 
a person appointed by Curtin ...
Under the direction of the Governing Board, the MEA Executive: 
develops and is responsible for the implementation of a b...
The MEA Executive is constituted as: 
a senior academic appointed by each University Member who has authority at his or h...
The objective of the MEA Workshops is to bring MEA academic staff together twice yearly in July and November to assess the...
•Build a national MEA research profile for mining engineering. 
•Identify MEA research synergies and build on them. 
•Esta...
Project: Research funding for competitive applications 
Purpose: To build a MEA research profile and increase the quantity...
Criteria for funding 
•Proposal must involve MEA staff from at least two member universities. 
•Proposal must be a real co...
The research context – the MEA strategy 
General: 
•Publish an annual summary of all significant research conducted by MEA...
Number of Mining Engineering graduates by year for MEA universities, non-MEA universities and total 
Students
0 
50 
100 
150 
200 
250 
300 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
Number of commencing MEA Mining Engi...
0 
100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
600 
700 
800 
900 
1000 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
Total MEA students 
Total number...
Internationalisation 
Memorandum of Understanding with Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú 
Australia Latin America F...
http://www.mea.edu.au
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PERUMIN 31: Mining Engineering, establishing and sustaining education and research excellence

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ENCUENTRO DE TECNOLOGÍA E INVESTIGACIÓN

BLOQUE: EDUCACIÓN Y RECURSOS HUMANOS
Conferencia Magistral 2 - Australia

Peter Dowd
Executive Director – Mining Education Australia
University of Adelaide

Martes, 17 de setiembre de 2013

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PERUMIN 31: Mining Engineering, establishing and sustaining education and research excellence

  1. 1. Mining Engineering in Australia establishing and sustaining education and research excellence Professor Peter Dowd Executive Director, Mining Education Australia Professor of Mining Engineering, University of Adelaide
  2. 2. Outline The Australian economy and the central role of mining. Mining Engineering education Degree programme and employability The demand and supply problem Educational problem facing the mining industry and the university sector The solution Sustainable delivery of mining engineering education and research Mining Education Australia (MEA) Sustaining education excellence Promoting collaborative research Building a national and international MEA research profile Internationalisation
  3. 3. THE AUSTRALIAN CONTEXT: THE ECONOMY AND THE CENTRAL ROLE OF MINING
  4. 4. The Australian context The national economy 1992 – 2012 economy grew at average annual rate of 3.2% per annum – significantly higher than the OECD average. 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 GDP real growth rate (%)
  5. 5. The Australian context The national economy Strong emphasis on exporting commodities – especially mineral and energy resources and agricultural produce. Recent economic growth has led to significant skills shortages particularly in Engineering: •60% of engineering sectors report engineering skills shortages •54% report loss of capability •40% do not have right mix of engineering skills to meet needs. 2007 – 2010 Net immigration 775,500 Natural population increase 425,900. Over the period 2000-10 population increased by 16% or 3.1 million
  6. 6. 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% $0 $20,000,000,000 $40,000,000,000 $60,000,000,000 $80,000,000,000 $100,000,000,000 $120,000,000,000 $140,000,000,000 $160,000,000,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Value of exports % of total export value Export value in $US Australian mineral product exports The Australian context
  7. 7. MCA represents Australia’s exploration, mining and minerals processing industry, nationally and internationally, in its contribution to sustainable development and society. MCA member companies produce more than 85 per cent of Australia’s annual mineral output. The MCA strategic objective is to advocate public policy and operational practice for a world-class industry that is safe, profitable, innovative, environmentally and socially responsible, attuned to community needs and expectations. The Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) The Australian context – mining industry
  8. 8. MCA Membership 52 member companies (mining and mining services companies) and 44 associate member companies. Member companies include: Anglo American Metallurgical Coal Ltd, AngloGold Ashanti Ltd, Barrick (Australia Pacific) Ltd, BHP Billiton, Glencore Xstrata, Newcrest Mining Ltd, Newmont Australia Ltd, Rio Tinto. The Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) The Australian context – mining industry
  9. 9. MINING ENGINEERING EDUCATION Programmes, graduates and employability
  10. 10. Tertiary engineering education in Australia All accredited professional Engineering programmes are normally of four years duration. Five-year Engineering degree programmes Melbourne model / Bologna model: University of Melbourne and University of Western Australia. Three-year general undergraduate programme plus two-year specialist Masters programme.
  11. 11. 2011 Graduates AGRICULTURE ARCHITECTURE BUILDING URBAN PLANNING HUMANITIES LANGUAGES VISUAL/PERFORM. ARTS SOCIAL SCIENCES PSYCHOLOGY SOCIAL WORK BUSINESS ACCOUNTING ECONOMICS EDUCATION – INITIAL EDUCATION – POST AERONAUTICAL ENG CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CIVIL ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECT/COMP ENG MECHANICAL ENG MINING ENGINEERING OTHER ENGINEERING SURVEYING DENTISTRY HEALTH NURSING – INITIAL NURSING – POST PHARMACY MEDICINE REHABILITATION LAW LAW OTHER COMPUTER SCIENCE LIFE SCIENCES MATHEMATICS CHEMISTRY PHYSICAL SCIENCES GEOLOGY VETERINARY SCIENCE TOTAL % 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 % In full-time employment (%) Seeking full-time employment (%) Further study (%)
  12. 12. In full-time employment Seeking full-time employment, not working Seeking full-time employment, working part-time Total seeking full- time employment Aeronautical Engineering 81.4 8.1 10.6 18.6 Chemical Engineering 77.5 11.5 11.1 22.5 Civil Engineering 90.5 5.4 4.1 9.5 Electrical Engineering 88.0 7.4 4.6 12.0 Electronic/Computer Engineering 79.5 10.5 10.0 20.5 Mechanical Engineering 88.4 7.3 4.4 11.6 Mining Engineering 93.9 5.1 1.0 6.1 Other Engineering 85.4 7.9 6.7 14.6 Bachelor of Engineering graduates available for full-time employment 2012 Source: Graduate Careers
  13. 13. THE DEMAND AND SUPPLY PROBLEM Graduate demand and supply
  14. 14. Cyclical nature of mining engineering graduate numbers: •Long-term characteristic since the 1960s. •International phenomenon. •Related to cyclical nature of the mining industry.
  15. 15. Australia: Terms of trade and GDP growth Source: HSBC Economic Report 2012 Recessions
  16. 16. 300 200 100 69 74 79 84 89 94 99 04 09 14 Number of graduates Year Lagged supply response to industry booms and busts Forecast Mining Engineering graduates 1969 to 2015 Beginning of China growth mining boom
  17. 17. Private mining capital expenditure $M) Mining Engineering graduates 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 MIning Engineering graduates Private mining capital/CPI Correlation between mining industry capital investment cycles and numbers of mining engineering graduates
  18. 18. Supply of Mining Engineers Source: NRSET; MTEC
  19. 19. University constraints Economic viability of degree programmes and courses: –four-year Bachelor of Engineering programme requires approximate minimum of 80 students (20 per year) to be economically viable. –cyclical nature of enrolments hinders sustainability. –almost all salary costs are met from teaching income. Mining Engineering has high infrastructure costs – laboratories and equipment. Shortage of good staff in many sub-disciplines (e.g., ventilation). Staff retention difficult when student enrolments decline or when salaries are not competitive with industry. Essential for research performance to be ranked at least world average (ERA – the Australian research assessment exercise).
  20. 20. Difficult to maintain research performance with loss of staff: •Disciplines within universities are assessed on their contributions to research. •Research performance will become increasingly important, even critical, to the survival of disciplines: •Regular national research performance assessment; •Increasing amounts of University funding determined by performance; •Within universities performance against national research metrics can and will have significant internal and external funding consequences; •International university rankings. University constraints - research
  21. 21. •Large numbers of students enter Mining Engineering degree programmes when jobs are plentiful (boom times). •Mining Engineering degree takes four years to complete  graduations lag the economic cycle by four years. •Students who graduate during economic downturns (bust times) cannot find employment in the mining industry. •Lack of jobs adversely affects student recruitment – enrolments decline. •Decrease in teaching income adversely affects economic viability of academic provision – pressure to reduce staff or close schools. •Loss of staff and contraction of facilities adversely affects quality. •Insufficient graduates when mining economic cycle improves. •Insufficient academic staff when cycle improves. Cyclical nature of mining engineering graduate numbers:
  22. 22. In worst case, when economic cycle improves: Insufficient schools; or For some disciplines (e.g., Mineral Processing), NO schools Eight minerals programmes closed between 1998 and 2004 – just as the China growth boom began
  23. 23. THE SOLUTION Sustainable delivery of Mining Engineering education and research
  24. 24. 1996 The Minerals Council of Australia established the National Tertiary Education Taskforce to identify specific steps for improving minerals tertiary education in Australia. Objective: To develop world-class education for a world-class minerals industry. 1998 Publication of report: Back from the brink - reshaping minerals tertiary education. Identified the “opportunity for a true partnership between industry, government and academia to reshape minerals education in Australia and secure the supply of the industry’s future specialist professionals.”
  25. 25. 1999 Minerals Council of Australia established Minerals Tertiary Education Council (MTEC) to build a world-class tertiary learning environment for the education of professionals for the Australian minerals industry. 2006 MTEC established Mining Education Australia (MEA) Joint Venture initially of three universities and now four: •University of Adelaide •Curtin University •University of New South Wales •University of Queensland
  26. 26. Through its university partners, MTEC currently supports and runs a range of educational programmes in the Australian minerals tertiary education sector including: Mining Education Australia (MEA); Minerals Geosciences Masters (MGM); Metallurgical Education Partnership (MEP); and Minerals Industry National Associate Degree (MINAD) Project. Minerals Tertiary Education Council (MTEC)
  27. 27. MINING EDUCATION AUSTRALIA
  28. 28. The Australian tertiary Mining Engineering sector 39 universities of which 32 offer Engineering programmes. Eight universities offer Mining Engineering programmes: University of Adelaide Curtin University University of New South Wales University of Queensland University of Ballarat University of Wollongong University of Western Australia Monash University Mining Education Australia members
  29. 29. University of Queensland University of New South Wales University of Adelaide Curtin University Kalgoorlie MEA universities
  30. 30. MEA MEA is an unincorporated joint venture, fostered and financially supported by the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) via its educational arm, the Minerals Tertiary Education Council (MTEC). Funding is at an agreed rate for each graduate. Currently, the agreed rate is $10,000 per graduate. After covering its operating costs, MEA distributes funds to the Member Universities on the basis of: the number of graduates; and the amount of collaboration in teaching. MEA also uses funds to provide incentives for other types of collaboration such as collaborative research.
  31. 31. MEA Objectives Establish and conduct a national, collaborative mining education programme for Australia; Rationalise and improve the teaching of mining engineering in Australia by co-ordinating the resources of the Members to produce a greater number of high-quality mining engineering graduates; Create an economically sustainable environment for the teaching of mining engineering; Increase the interest in, and access to, mining engineering programmes at the Member Universities, resulting in increased graduate numbers;
  32. 32. Attract and develop high-quality students and researchers into the field of mining engineering; Produce high-quality graduates and researchers in the field of mining engineering to the benefit of the mining industry and the Australian economy and society generally; and Offer high-quality programmes in mining engineering within Australia and internationally. MEA Objectives
  33. 33. An economically and academically sustainable environment for mining engineering High-quality teaching: A national curriculum for years 3 and 4 of the degree programme; Collaborative teaching; Four universities contributing to curriculum significantly improves quality. Internationally competitive research: MEA grants to foster collaborative research; Industry collaboration encouraged. Internationalisation. Marketing and promotion – students, governments, industry, community.
  34. 34. Governing Board Executive Director and MEA Executive Programme Leaders Committee Academic staff from Member Universities MEA Governance
  35. 35. MEA Governing Board The Governing Board oversees the direction and operation of MEA. In particular, it: sets the strategic direction of MEA; is responsible for the financial management of MEA; sets goals and key performance indicators for MEA; approves the annual operating plan and budget; appoints the Executive Director; approves the Curriculum and the programme content and structure; and develops and oversees student recruitment. The Governing Board meets at least twice each year.
  36. 36. The Governing Board is constituted as: a person appointed by the University of Adelaide; a person appointed by Curtin University; a person appointed by the University of New South Wales; a person appointed by the University of Queensland; the Executive Director; a person nominated by the Board of Directors of MCA who shall be the Chair of MTEC or a member of the Board of Directors of MCA; and three persons, nominated by the MCA, who have knowledge of, and are experienced in the mining industry. MEA Governing Board - membership
  37. 37. Under the direction of the Governing Board, the MEA Executive: develops and is responsible for the implementation of a business plan for MEA, which is approved by the Governing Board; implements the marketing plan approved by the Governing Board; implements the strategic directions set by the Governing Board; monitors and reports to the Board on the performance of MEA against the key performance indicators and goals set by the Governing Board; and considers recommendations on academic matters brought forward by the Programme Leaders Committee for approval and implementation as considered appropriate. MEA Executive
  38. 38. The MEA Executive is constituted as: a senior academic appointed by each University Member who has authority at his or her University over the resources within that University with respect to undergraduate mining engineering; the Executive Director; a person nominated by the MCA; and the Chair of the Programme Leaders Committee. The MEA Executive meets at least four times each year and is chaired by the Executive Director. MEA Executive – membership
  39. 39. The objective of the MEA Workshops is to bring MEA academic staff together twice yearly in July and November to assess the Semester’s work and to plan for the new semester. Each workshop runs for two days and has a number of sessions devoted to standard topics such as curriculum. It also usually includes sessions on strategies, e.g., research. Academic staff – MEA workshops
  40. 40. •Build a national MEA research profile for mining engineering. •Identify MEA research synergies and build on them. •Establish a collaborative, supportive MEA research community. •Build research grant applications around the best expertise in each university. •As far as possible, concentrate publications in journals that have high quality and impact. •Ensure members’ profiles are kept up-to-date in research council databases and in MEA records and promotional activities. The research context – the MEA strategy
  41. 41. Project: Research funding for competitive applications Purpose: To build a MEA research profile and increase the quantity and quality of mining research in MEA universities. The research context – the MEA strategy
  42. 42. Criteria for funding •Proposal must involve MEA staff from at least two member universities. •Proposal must be a real collaboration and must bring more than would be delivered by any individual partner. •Expected that project would leverage additional funding from non-MEA sources or be a pilot for a subsequent larger grant application or both. •Subject to satisfying previous criteria, quality of the proposal is the over- riding criterion. Quality includes potential for the project to generate further research and potential for generating papers in archived journals. •A short report summarising outcomes against original objectives is required at the conclusion of the project. The research context – the MEA strategy
  43. 43. The research context – the MEA strategy General: •Publish an annual summary of all significant research conducted by MEA academics (papers, grants, awards, summaries of successfully completed projects). •Provide copies of the annual research report to industry and research funding agencies. •Develop capability statements in collaborative research strengths; circulate to industry. •Promote the MEA research profile on the MEA website. •Consider holding MEA research forums for industry.
  44. 44. Number of Mining Engineering graduates by year for MEA universities, non-MEA universities and total Students
  45. 45. 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of commencing MEA Mining Engineering students Students
  46. 46. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Total MEA students Total number of MEA Mining Engineering students by year Students
  47. 47. Internationalisation Memorandum of Understanding with Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Australia Latin America Foundation (ALAF) grant for seven Australian Leadership Award Fellowships: Title: Collaborative leadership for teaching sustainable mining practices Participants:  Universidad Nacional de Colombia  Universidad de Azuay, Ecuador  Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Five-week visit to MEA universities (July-August 2013) and Australian mining industry: workshops, mine visits, collaboration.
  48. 48. http://www.mea.edu.au

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