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Wikipedia: a model for using the Internet for good

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Wikipedia slide deck used at the first Good Internet conference, UC Berkeley, April 2011. Original content is licensed CC-BY 3.0.

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Wikipedia: a model for using the Internet for good

  1. 1. 2001 news story bit.ly/AP-commercial-net
  2. 2. 2011 site rankings source: comScore Top 25 sites worldwide: GooMicroFaceYippee AmazAOLeBay……
  3. 3. 2011 site rankings source: comScore Top 25 sites worldwide: 1-4: GooMicroFaceYippee #5: Wikimedia sites 6-25: AmazAOLeBay……
  4. 4. Wikipedia Audience Compared With Other Information Sites Measured using unique visitors. Data from comScore MediaMetrix. (Global Unique Visitors, in millions of users) 2007 2008 2009 2010
  5. 5. Wikipedia and wiki collaboration: a model for inclusive media production Collaborative peer production has exploded onto the scene. <ul><li>How does it work? </li><ul><ul><li>Technical core: wiki software
  6. 6. Legal core: free licenses </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Why is it important? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Five features that make Wikipedia work <ul><li>Editing an article
  8. 8. User profile pages
  9. 9. Discussion/talk/project pages
  10. 10. Editing history view
  11. 11. Recent Changes, watch lists, user contributions </li></ul>
  12. 13. Wikipedia markup codes <ul>'''Arthur Herbert Fonzarelli''' (also '''Fonzie''', '''The Fonz''', or '''Fonz''') is a [[fictional character]] played by [[Henry Winkler]] in the [[United States|American]] [[situation comedy|sitcom]] ''[[Happy Days]]'' … </ul>
  13. 14. HTML code <ul><p><b>Arthur Herbert Fonzarelli</b> (also <b>Fonzie</b>, <b>The Fonz</b>, or <b>Fonz</b>) is a <a href=&quot;/wiki/Fictional_character&quot; class=&quot;mw-redirect&quot; title=&quot;Fictional character&quot;>fictional character</a> played by <a href=&quot;/wiki/Henry_Winkler&quot;>Henry Winkler</a> in the <a href=&quot;/wiki/United_States&quot; title=&quot;United States&quot;>American</a> <a href=&quot;/wiki/Situation_comedy&quot; title=&quot;Situation comedy&quot; class=&quot;mw-redirect&quot;>sitcom</a> <i><a href=&quot;/wiki/Happy_Days&quot;>Happy Days</a></i> … </ul>
  14. 17. Recent items from Libya talk page <ul><li>Culture
  15. 18. Feb 2011 unrest in Libya
  16. 19. Foreign Relations
  17. 20. Presently on-going (edit)-war
  18. 21. Flag and coat of arms
  19. 22. Religious / political bias?
  20. 23. History does not mention the Gulf of Sidra incidents.
  21. 24. Augment/integrate Fist Crushing a U.S. Fighter Plane statue? </li></ul>
  22. 26. Five things that make Wikipedia work <ul><li>Editing an article
  23. 27. User profile pages
  24. 28. Discussion/talk/project pages
  25. 29. Editing history view
  26. 30. Recent Changes, watch lists, user contributions </li></ul>
  27. 31. Open Source/free licenses Permission to build on others’ work … if I like a program…I must share it… Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way. — Richard Stallman, GNU Manifesto, 1985
  28. 32. Three things that make Wikipedia work <ul><li>Perceive what your fellow humans have done
  29. 33. Permission to build on that work (free license)
  30. 34. Software that supports collaborative building </li></ul>
  31. 35. How does the rest of media work? What other efforts have been made to hold special or corporate interests at bay?
  32. 36. <ul>The Fairness Doctrine </ul><ul><li>U.S. government policy, 1949–1987
  33. 37. Required holders of broadcast licenses to present controversial issues of public importance
  34. 38. Required honest, equitable and balanced presentation </li></ul>
  35. 39. Corporation for Public Broadcasting <ul><li>non-profit corporation
  36. 40. promotes public broadcasting
  37. 41. created by act of Congress (1967)
  38. 42. funded by the Federal Government </li></ul>
  39. 43. Independent (?) commentator Jon Stewart Image credit: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Adam M. Stump
  40. 44. Innovative (?) entrepreneur Arianna Huffington Image credit: World Economic Forum
  41. 45. Wikipedia puts YOU in charge.
  42. 46. An opportunity A responsibility
  43. 47. Wikipedia is broadly empowering <ul>Values: <li>Written without bias
  44. 48. Verifiable information
  45. 49. Comprehensive
  46. 50. Available free of charge
  47. 51. Open to remixing and republication </li></ul>
  48. 52. Non-commercial core <ul><li>No advertisements
  49. 53. Personal information collection very limited
  50. 54. Content evaluated purely on its quality </li></ul>
  51. 56. By the numbers <ul><li>Wikipedia and sister projects comprise the world’s 5 th most popular web property
  52. 57. 400 million people view its pages each month
  53. 58. 90,000 active contributors
  54. 59. Sustained by non-profit organization
  55. 60. Over $16 million raised in 2010 from small donations </li></ul>
  56. 61. Over 450 tenth birthday parties
  57. 62. Wikipedia has its own problems <ul><li>Experts are sometimes marginalized
  58. 63. Difficult for reader to discern good/bad content
  59. 64. Clashing values: anonymity, accountability
  60. 65. System can be “gamed”
  61. 66. (but what system can’t?) </li></ul>
  62. 67. From a history of Russian Wikipedia “ The increasing acceptance of Wikipedia’s reliability and legitimacy had attracted many national, political, and religious minorities to the project, who were tempted by the ability to finally tell their side of the story, or, more dangerously, to rewrite history in their favor .” — Victoria Doronina & Maryana Pinchuk, 2011 http://enwp.org/m:RuWiki_History/English
  63. 68. Number of active contributors declining
  64. 69. The next step: going mainstream <ul><li>Editor diversity
  65. 70. Expertise in different subject areas
  66. 71. Global reach (editors and readers)
  67. 72. A welcoming and productive environment </li></ul>
  68. 73. Becoming indispensible “ But in 2009, the Russian Wikipedia was no longer a small, intimate online community; it was a legitimate source of information for the Russian-speaking world.” — Doronina & Pinchuk, 2011
  69. 74. Strategic plan “ Wikimedia projects are among the most-visited sites in the world, however Wikimedia does not yet have a technological, operational and financial infrastructure commensurate with people’s reliance upon it.” — Wikimedia’s five year strategic plan
  70. 75. Wikimedia theory of change (from strategic plan)
  71. 76. Evolving culture “When I left [Wikipedia], it was a big village where everyone knew one another, and when I came back it was already a bustling city with its own central administration, rules, policies, law enforcement, judges, maniacs, not to mention the countless masses of honest workers.” —Dodonov, programmer from St. Petersburg
  72. 77. Engaging established institutions <ul><li>Academia
  73. 78. Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums
  74. 79. Journalism
  75. 80. Government </li></ul>
  76. 81. Wikipedia Public Policy Initiative <ul><li>Wikipedians support professors in using Wikipedia as a teaching tool
  77. 82. More than 30 schools, 40 classes
  78. 83. More than 100 volunteer “ambassadors” </li></ul>
  79. 84. Wikipedians in Residence <ul><li>British Museum
  80. 85. Children’s Museum of Indianapolis
  81. 86. Palace of Versailles </li></ul>
  82. 87. Tools for journalists <ul><li>Watch list
  83. 88. Article history pages
  84. 89. Discussion/talk pages
  85. 90. WikiProjects (look at top of talk pages) </li></ul>
  86. 91. Essential ingredients <ul><li>Flexible software platform for collaboration
  87. 92. A dedicated volunteer community
  88. 93. Free license: clarifies how content may be used </li><ul><li>CC-BY-SA: Any reuse is permissible (even commercial)
  89. 94. Original author(s) must be credited (e.g. with a link)
  90. 95. Derivative works must also be CC-BY-SA </li></ul></ul>
  91. 96. Three things we can do:
  92. 97. Three things we can do: <ul><li>Commit to release some of our work under a free license . </li></ul>
  93. 98. Three things we can do: <ul><li>Commit to release some of our work under a free license .
  94. 99. Commit to “ tinkering ” in public, sharing knowledge, building on others’ work, and seeking input. </li></ul>
  95. 100. Three things we can do: <ul><li>Commit to release some of our work under a free license .
  96. 101. Commit to “ tinkering ” in public, sharing knowledge, building on others’ work, and seeking input.
  97. 102. Commit to helping those around us (people, organizations) understand resources like Wikipedia. </li></ul>
  98. 103. Questions? <ul><li>Pete Forsyth: [email_address] or [[User:Peteforsyth]]
  99. 104. Organization: http://wikimediafoundation.org
  100. 105. Ambassador program: http://enwp.org/WP:AMBASSADOR
  101. 106. Russian Wikipedia study: http://enwp.org/m:RuWiki_History </li></ul>

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