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Privacy in the Digital Age

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Privacy in the Digital Age

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Lee Rainie, Director, Internet, Science and Technology from the Pew Research Center to delivered a keynote address at WAN-IFRA’s first World Media Policy Forum. Rainie is one of the world’s top academic researchers on the internet and the social changes triggered by information and communication technologies (ICT.) He talked about what research is showing us about privacy strategies and statistics.

Lee Rainie, Director, Internet, Science and Technology from the Pew Research Center to delivered a keynote address at WAN-IFRA’s first World Media Policy Forum. Rainie is one of the world’s top academic researchers on the internet and the social changes triggered by information and communication technologies (ICT.) He talked about what research is showing us about privacy strategies and statistics.

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Privacy in the Digital Age

  1. Privacy in the Digital Age Lee Rainie (@lrainie) Director, Internet, Science, and Technology Research Pew Research Center 6.3.15 WAN-IFRA – World Media Policy Forum
  2. Background • Surveys of U.S. adults – post- Snowden • Privacy issues are jumbled together in people’s heads and don’t unpack easily: –Sur-veillance –Sous-veillance –Co-veillance
  3. 1. The balance of forces has shifted in the networked age. People are now “public by default and private by effort.” -- danah boyd
  4. Personal information online % of adult internet users who say this information about them is available online 20% 21% 21% 24% 29% 30% 38% 44% 46% 50% 66% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Your political party / affiliation Video of you Your home phone number Your cell number Which groups / orgs you belong to Your home address Things you’ve written using your name Your employer / company you work for Your email address Your birth date A photo of you
  5. Who users try to avoid % of adult internet users who say they have used the internet in ways to avoid being observed or seen by … 4% 5% 6% 6% 11% 14% 17% 19% 19% 28% 33% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Law enforcement The government Companies / people who run the website you visited Companies / people who might want payment for files you download Employer, supervisor, coworkers Family members or romantic partner People who might criticize / harass you People from your past Certain friends Advertisers Hackers or criminals
  6. 2. Privacy is not binary / context matters
  7. 3. Personal control / agency matters
  8. 4. Most accept that certain trade-offs are part of the bargain
  9. 55% “agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “I am willing to share some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free.”
  10. 5. The young are more focused on networked privacy than their elders
  11. • Those ages 18-29 are more likely than older adults to say: • They take steps to limit the amount of personal information available about them online—44% of young adult internet users say this. • They change privacy settings – 71%of social networking users ages 18-29 have changed privacy settings on their profile to limit what they share with others online. • They delete unwanted comments – 47%social networking users ages 18-29 have deleted comments that others have made on their profile. • They remove their name from photos – 41% of social networking users ages 18-29 say they have removed their name from photos that were tagged to identify them.
  12. Young adults are the most likely to have had major problems with personal information and identity 28% 23% 7% 13% 11% 22% 15% 14% 6% 4% 17% 2% 11% 2% 1% 9% 3% 8% 4% 0% 10% 20% 30% Had email or SNS account compromised or taken over without permission Been stalked or harassed online Had important info stolen such as SSN, credit card, bank info Had reputation damaged because of something that happened online Online events led you into physical danger Ages 18-29 Ages 30-49 Ages 50-64 Ages 65+
  13. 6. Many know they do not know what is going on …. Those who know the most are more worried and wary
  14. 7. Many are resigned – some are even hopeless – and their trust is fading
  15. How confident are you that your records at these places will remain private and secure? 76% 69% 66% 61% 57% 56% 55% 54% 50% 46% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Online advertisers Social media Search engines Retailers Email provider Cell telephone Government agencies Cable TV Landline telephone Credit card Not too confident / Not at all confident
  16. Changes in laws would help 8. Changes in law could make a difference
  17. • 68% of internet users believe current laws are not good enough in protecting people’s privacy online. • 64% believe the government should do more to regulate advertisers, compared with 34% who think the government should not get more involved.
  18. • When asked if they feel as though their own efforts to protect the privacy of their personal information online are sufficient, 61% say they feel as though they “would like to do more,” while 37% say they “already do enough.” • 88% of adults “agree” (49%) or “strongly agree” (39%) that it would be very difficult to remove inaccurate information about them online.
  19. Thank you! Lee Rainie lrainie@pewresearch.org @lrainie @pewinternet @pewresearch

Notas del editor

  • World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers – WAN-IFRA
    http://www.wan-ifra.org/

    Wednesday June 3, 2015
    Washington Hilton, Washington DC
     
    14:00 – 16:30
    World Media Policy Forum: dissecting the big challenges facing publishers, policy makers and civil society
    Focus on internet governance and right to be forgotten
     
     
    The social changes and consequences of the networked society are still being measured. Nonetheless publishers must evaluate and respond now to rapid technology change with policies that will not only protect the ideals that underpin independent and ethical journalism and press freedom but also business sustainability.
     
    As a consequence, it seems that in 2015 publishers, Internet giants and private citizens find themselves engaging more and more passionately in debates around media policy, with alliances changing dramatically depending on the topic.
     
    To help consider appropriate policy responses, we have decided to organize WAN-IFRA’s first World Media Policy Forum, where legal experts, international institutions and practitioners will contribute to clarify where we stand, and where we are headed. 
     
    We have invited Lee Rainie, Director, Internet, Science and Technology from the Pew Research Center to deliver a keynote address. Rainie is one of the world’s top academic researchers on the internet and the social changes triggered by information and communication technologies (ICT.) He will talk about what research is showing us about privacy strategies and statistics.


    Title: Sur-veillance, Sous-veillace and Co-veillance
    Abstract: Personal privacy in the networked age is limited by three dimensions of “veillance.” They shape people’s behavior and their anxieties about the future of privacy. Lee Rainie will present the latest survey findings from the Pew Research Center about how people try to navigate this new environment in their relationship with government, commercial enterprises, and each other. He will also discuss how some technologists are trying to respond.

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