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Week 2
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Week 3

  1. 1. Communicating about Psychology Recognise conventions of academic writing Apply online learning to evaluate and correct writing Structure effective paragraphs
  2. 2. In pairs, assess the example writing and correct it using track changes. Use what you already know about academic writing
  3. 3. So, what does academic writing look like and why is it important?
  4. 4. What does academic writing look like and why is it important? Your writing at university • is one way you communicate your knowledge, understanding and ideas with your tutors • needs to show that you are using good sources of information: all academic work needs evidence So, it needs to be • Clear • Accurate • Formal • Logical • Supported
  5. 5. Avoid slang: This theory is dead hard. = This theory is difficult to understand. No rhetorical questions: How can this problem be addressed without the appropriate support? Avoid overly complicated language: A multipronged tool was utilized to process a starch resource. = A fork was used to eat a potato. Making sure you have the basics Use the third person, unless you are writing about your reflections: In my project I will discuss… = This project will discuss Avoid contractions: wouldn’t = would not Keep some distance and some caution: These results prove that it is absolutely terrible that people do not recycle. = The results suggest that the lack of recycling is a concern. No exclamation marks, unless it is your blog: This was an incredible result! = This was a positive result.
  6. 6. Spelling, grammar and punctuation • Look at any corrections that your tutors make: identify and learn the correct versions of any mistakes you make frequently (for example, there/their). What errors did you not pick up earlier? • If you are unsure about some aspects of spelling, grammar and punctuation, this is a useful website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zr9 d7ty
  7. 7. Once you are using academic language, you can start to think about structure. Good academic language needs a structure to hold it. Structure helps with clarity and communication. The paragraph is the foundation of good academic structure.
  8. 8. Using WEED to plan paragraphs • What is your paragraph about? • Explanation: what do you mean? Offer some explanation, maybe from your reading. • Examples: make sure that you illustrate your point with examples from your evidence. • Do: What do I do with this information? How is it relevant? Keep asking questions’
  9. 9. Everyday memory is a key part of eyewitness testimony (EWT) because it relies on the recollection of events that have been frequently thought about or rehearsed (Eysenck & Keane, 2015). There are three assumptions of everyday memory: it is purposeful, influenced by an individual’s personality/characteristics and influenced by situational demands. Neisser (1996) suggests that our personal goals determine our everyday memory. This includes autobiographical memory, which enables us to remember events of our own life. However, infantile amnesia makes it harder to recall events occurring between the ages 2-8. Lastly, we experience prospective memory, which involves a monitoring process and the retrospective memory to enable us to remember how to carry out tasks. All these elements of everyday memory are used subconsciously during EWT but it suggests that the various influences of purpose, personality and age may particularly contribute to it being an unreliable form of evidence. What Explanation Examples (Notice how the explanation and examples can blend. Explanations depend on examples so make sure you have both.) Do
  10. 10. Paragraph jigsaws • In your groups, you have got a What part of a paragraph • You need to find the E, E and D for that paragraph from the selection around the room. • Explanations are in green • Examples/evidence are in blue • Doing sections are in pink
  11. 11. Online Learning this week: 1. review activities in Quizzes. 2. get up to date on your blog and start adding in some images, media and so on.
  12. 12. Homework • Find another article/podcast on a Psychology related topic and bring a summary with you next week. • Formative assignment (not graded): • Use everything you have learnt about summarising information and writing academically, to write a paragraph summarising either your choice of article from last week’s homework or the one you are using for this week. • Submit on Canvas.

Notas del editor

  • NB – this class is on the basic conventions – there is a later class on writing to build an argument: structure (using but going beyond previous work on effective paragraphs), use of language (transitioning, signposting, reporting verbs and evaluative vocabulary). START OFF WITH ASKING 2-3 OF THEM TO GIVE US THEIR ORAL SUMMARIES OF THEIR HOMEWORK TASK AGAIN – SHOW THEM HOW IT IS BECOMING A REGULAR THING
  • 20 mins –(if you are not in an IT room, this can be adapted to a paper-based exercise) The document will be on Canvas – they open it up and work in pairs on assessing it. Show them how to use track changes first (another useful digital skill!). Once they have worked on it, they can go to the version (also on Canvas) with my comments in track changes. They can then have their comments version on one screen and their partner can have the tutor version on their screen, so that they then compare their comments with the tutor’s and assess how close they were to identifying all the issues and correcting them. They shouldn't worry if they didn’t get many – this is part of the learning process. They are intended to use their learning from the online quiz to do this first of all, and then the idea is that they learn more after comparing their comments with mine. They could note down which problems they missed as that could be where they should focus their own attention in their writing.
  • 10 mins including specific reference to the activity. Just get their ideas based on their assessment of the sample paragraph and their self-evaluation after looking at the tutor version. Their comments could be added to this slide as they speak to reinforce and recognise their contributions while (probably) not having a white board.
  • 5 mins To validate and extend previous discussion. The point about one way they communicate allows you to emphasise that they also communicate their knowledge etc in classes, through conversations and discussions (as well as formal presentations). So, while they can have conversations as part of their learning, their writing isn’t a conversation, which is why there needs to be a more formal tone and style. The point could also be made that when giving formal presentations, they also need to use an academic style and tone when speaking, and on their presentation slides. It could also be worth reminding them that the clarity, formality and accuracy is also important when they are writing outside university for, e.g., job applications. However, you should probably add that their blogs don’t need to be in a formal academic style but more conversational.
  • 5 mins Go through each to explain the basics, which hopefully they will have elucidated anyway. It’s worth having the key points as a reminder for them, and it is a chance to remind them of why these features of academic writing are the most important to get to grips with at this stage – we will be going further in a few weeks! It is really the focus on clarity, formality and avoiding hyperbole.
  • 2 -3 mins
  • 2-3 mins Explain these points as we go through them.
  • Go through this with as a useful model for paragraph writing. They can play around with the order of the EEs and there can be D at various places but they should always start with a W and try to end on a D. To start with though, W E E (EE in any order or blended) D is a good place to start.
  • This is to show them how WEED can look. This is the ‘proper’ version of the paragraphs they were working on at the start, to aid consistency of information/material, but also so that they could go back themselves and see how the same basic ideas and information have been turned in to a clearer, more formal, accurate and supported piece of writing.
  • 20 minutes – Three paragraphs broken up to be provided. They are all rom the same essay so that they can think about structure within an essay – how a piece of evidence has to be relevant to that particular paragraph and not just the essay topic as a whole. In your feedback discussion after they have completed the activity, you can show them the completed paragraphs from the word document you have of them. Keep encouraging them to think about what their ‘What’ section is saying and to try out a few different versions of their paragraph to see what works. In the feedback, push for explanations of why the correct versions are correct. You will have these sections in packs to distribute around the room (get them up and moving) – there are enough of each section from each paragraph that all of the groups could choose the same, but only one would be correct, to make it a bit trickier.
  • This is all they have online this week to give them a chance to develop what they have already – could comment on those you have seen. Also because they do have a formative assignment to do too.
  • Explain what we mean by formative and emphasise how useful this formative work is. Show them how to submit it (there will be a submission box on Canvas by then!).

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